Speedlanging

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Xing
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Re: Speedlanging

Post by Xing » 02 Jul 2012 00:01

What does "complex syllable structure" mean? Anything more complicated than CV?

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Click
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Re: Speedlanging

Post by Click » 02 Jul 2012 00:05

Syllable structure larger than (C)(C)N(C) or (C)N(C)(C).

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Re: Speedlanging

Post by nmn » 02 Jul 2012 11:57

/p/ [p] [f] <p>
/b/ [v] <b>
/t/ [t] <t>
/d/ [d] [z] <d>
/k/ [k] [h] <k>
/g/ [g] <g>
/n/ [m] [n] [ŋ] [ɲ] <n>
/r/ [r] <r>
/l/ [l] [ɫ] <l>
/j/ [j] [ʎ] <j>
[ə]
-the nasal vowel assimilates to the POA of the following consonant. In case the word ends in a nasal, there is a sandhi with the first consonant of the next word; in case there is no next word, the nasal is [n];
-there is 'consonant harmony' - there cant be both (bi)labial and velar consonants in a word
-only the nasal sandhi can break the consonant harmony
-p b t d k are stops and the end of the word and before a fricative and fricative otherwise, i.e. they are fricative before g n r l j and a stop
-t is a stop before alveolar n
-all consonants except for the stops can be geminated; the gemination doesnt occur if there is ' between the consonants (' in itself doesnt have any sound)
-syllable nucleus are r l j; in case they are not present, then is the nasal; in case of no nasal, the fricatives are the nucleus
-l is ɫ before velars, at the end of the word and l otherwise
-j is ʎ only if there is l in the word
-a final stop is slightly aspirated
-ə is unmarked in orthography;it appears between consonants with different POA and it cant be a syllable nucleus;
-stress falls on the last syllable
Swadesh:
· I - dnbd
· thou - t'tk
· he/she/it - tnk
· we - dnnpt
· you - dttk
· they - pjjt
· this - tbn
· that - nbn
· here - hktn
· there - kdtn
· who - jkl
· what - k'kkt
· where - kds
· when - kng
· how - tbbp
· not - bdn
· all - bt'tj
· many - trn
· some - dnp
· few - nlk
· other - drrk
· one - dn
· two - drk
· three - plt
· four - jjnp
· five - llnp
· big - grrt't
· long - dlk
· wide - trk
· thick - dblk
· heavy - d'drrk
· small - ntllk
· short - llt
· narrow - jnllk
· thin - tntk
· woman - dn
· man - ntk
· human - tbt
· child - dlt
· wife - bldn
· husband - bllntp
· mother - njjk
· father - tkkt
· animal - dbbtn
· fish - trrp
· bird - kt
· dog - kjjt
· louse - btp
· snake - trrn
· worm - kjtllk
· cat - tkrrn

P - p or k due to consonant harmony; if there are neither velars or labials, p is used
B - b or g due to consonant harmony; if there are neither velars or labials, b is used

Plural is marked with P:
trrnp - snakes bldnp - wives tkrrnk - cats
If the word already ends in a stop, an epenthetic t is added:
kjjt'tk - dogs;kt'tk - birds
Few words have irregular plurals:
man - ntk; men - nt't
worm - kjtllk; worms - kjtllkt't

Possesive is formed with adding -tn: kt'tn of the birds; these words come after the clarified one; adjectives come before nouns
ntllktk kjjt'tk nlk dlt'tp - the small dogs of the few children
Cant bother to finish this

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Re: Speedlanging

Post by Click » 02 Jul 2012 15:14

The Rutān grammar
Phonology
Phonemic inventory
8 consonants, 4 vowels.

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---------------------------------------------------
| IPA         | Labial    | Coronal   | Dorsal    |
---------------------------------------------------
| Nasal       |     m     |     n     |           |
---------------------------------------------------
| Stop        |     p     |     t     |    k g    |
---------------------------------------------------
| Fricative   |           |     s     |           |
---------------------------------------------------
| Approximant |           |     ɹ     |           |
---------------------------------------------------
| Orthography | Labial    | Coronal   | Dorsal    |
---------------------------------------------------
| Nasal       |     m     |     n     |           |
---------------------------------------------------
| Stop        |     p     |     t     |    c g    |
---------------------------------------------------
| Fricative   |           |     s     |           |
---------------------------------------------------
| Approximant |           |     r     |           |
---------------------------------------------------

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---------------------------------------------
| IPA         | Front   | Central | Back    |
---------------------------------------------
| High        |    i    |         |    u    |
---------------------------------------------
| Low         |         |  a a:   |         |
---------------------------------------------
| Orthography | Front   | Central | Back    |
---------------------------------------------
| High        |    i    |         |    u    |
---------------------------------------------
| Low         |         |   a ā   |         |
---------------------------------------------
Allophony
Nasals assimilate to the POA of the following consonant.
Stops and fricatives intervocalically lenite [->]

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----------------------------------------
| Lenition | V_V[-front] | V_V[+front] |
----------------------------------------
| p        | β           | βʲ          |
----------------------------------------
| t        | d           | ðʲ          |
----------------------------------------
| k        | g           | ʝ           |
----------------------------------------
| g        | ɣ           | ɟ͡ʝ         |
----------------------------------------
| s        | z           | z           |
----------------------------------------
/s/ is affricated to [t͡s] after a nasal.
/p t k/ are aspirated non-intervocalically before a vowel.
/p t k g/ are realised as [b d g ŋ] before a voiced consonant.
/ɹ/ is realised as [w] after /u/ and as [j] before /i/.
A voiceless obstruent is voiced after a voiced obstruent.
A voiceless obstruent is voiced before a voiced obstruent.
/i a a: u/ are reduced to [ɪ ə a ʊ] in unstressed syllables.
/i a a: u/ are realised as [ẽ ã ã: õ] before a nasal in stressed syllables.
Phonotactics
The syllable structure is (C)(C)(C)V(C)(C).
The C onset
Every C onset consists of only one consonant. That consonant can be any consonant.
The CC onset
Every CC onset consists of two consonants. The permitted CC onsets are tabulated below [->]

Code: Select all

---------------------------------------------
|   | m  | n  | p  | t  | k  | g  | s  | ɹ  |
---------------------------------------------
| m |    | nm | pm | tm | km | gm | sm |    |
---------------------------------------------
| n | mn |    | pn | tn | kn | gn | sn |    |
---------------------------------------------
| p | mp | np |    | tp | kp | gp | sp |    |
---------------------------------------------
| t | mt | nt | pt |    | kt | gt | st |    |
---------------------------------------------
| k | mk | nk | pk | tk |    |    | sk |    |
---------------------------------------------
| g | mg | ng | pg | tg |    |    | sg |    |
---------------------------------------------
| s | ms | ns | ps | ts | ks | gs |    |    |
---------------------------------------------
| ɹ | mɹ | nɹ | pɹ | tɹ | kɹ | gɹ | sɹ |    |
---------------------------------------------
The CCC onset
Every CCC onsets consists of 3 consonants.
The permitted CCC onsets are /spm stm skm spn stn skn tp kp gp sp spt skt spk stk spg stg sps sts sks spɹ stɹ skɹ sgɹ/.
The C coda
Every C coda consists of only one consonant. That consonant can be any consonant.
The CC coda
Every CC coda consists of two consonants. The permitted CC codas are tabulated below [->]

Code: Select all

---------------------------------------------
|   | m  | n  | p  | t  | k  | g  | s  | ɹ  |
---------------------------------------------
| m |    | nm |    |    |    |    |    | ɹm |
---------------------------------------------
| n | mn |    |    |    |    |    |    | ɹn |
---------------------------------------------
| p | mp | np |    | tp | kp | gp | sp | ɹp |
---------------------------------------------
| t | mt | nt | pt |    | kt | gt | st | ɹt |
---------------------------------------------
| k | mk | nk | pk | tk |    |    | sk | ɹk |
---------------------------------------------
| g | mg | ng | pg | tg |    |    | sg | ɹg |
---------------------------------------------
| s | ms | ns | ps | ts | ks | gs |    | ɹs |
---------------------------------------------
| ɹ |    |    |    |    |    |    |    |    |
---------------------------------------------
Stress
Stress depends on the syllable weight i.e. the syllable that weighs the most is stressed.
If all syllables weigh the same, then the next-to-last syllable is stressed.
The syllable types are ordered by decreasing syllable weight [->] CCCV:CC, CCCVCC/CCV:CC/CCCV:C, CCCV:/CCVCC/CCV:C/CV:CC CVCC/CCVC/CV:C, CVC/V:C/CV:, VC/CV, V.
Syllables with a slash between weigh equally.
Sandhi
C[-continuant] + C[-continuant] -> C[-continuant].
/a/ + /a/ -> /a:/

Nouns
Nouns distinguish case and number.
There are 3 numbers: singular, dual and plural.
There are 2 cases: nominative and oblique.
The oblique case is used without a preposition when it marks the direct object, otherwise it is used together with an appropriate preposition.
The nominative is used when the noun is a subject or in a predicate(Cats are cats.).
The case and number suffixes [->]

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-------------------------
|          | NOM | OBL  |
-------------------------
| Singular | -ø  | -i   |
-------------------------
| Dual     | -u  | -iu  |
-------------------------
| Plural   | -mā | -mai |
-------------------------
-ø means unmarked.

Augmentation and diminution
The diminutive form of noun is made by suffixing -ci on the noun.
The augmentative form of noun is made by suffixing -gu on the noun.
The diminutive and augmentative affixes go before the inflection suffixes.

Adjectives/Adverbs
Adjectives and adverbs are a single word class.
They take the suffixes of a noun or a verb they describe.
They follow the noun or verb they describe.
If they don't describe any verb or noun, they behave as nouns do.

Verbs
Verbs inflect per tense, voice and person of object and subject.
There are 3 voices: active, mediopassive(also used as middle voice) and passive.
There are 2 tenses: past and non-past. The future tense is expressed by particle ptān that goes before the verb.
Voice and tense suffixes [->]

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----------------------------------------------
|          | Active | Mediopassive | Passive |
----------------------------------------------
| Non-past | -mut   | -ist         | -rāt    |
----------------------------------------------
| Past     | -mā    | -isa         | -rāa    |
----------------------------------------------
Subject person prefixes [->]

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---------------------------
|    | 1P   | 2P   | 3P   |
---------------------------
| SG | pi-  | si-  | ni-  |
---------------------------
| DU | pā-  | sā-  | nā-  |
---------------------------
| PL | pru- | sru- | nru- |
---------------------------
Object person suffixes go after the tense and voice suffixes. Object person suffixes [->]

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---------------------------
|    | 1P   | 2P   | 3P   |
---------------------------
| SG | -gi  | -pti | -ri  |
---------------------------
| DU | -gā  | -ptā | -rā  |
---------------------------
| PL | -gru | -pru | -ru  |
---------------------------
The infinitive is formed by prefixing ca- to uninflected verb root. The infinitive is the citation form of a verb.

There is an irregular verb catu (to be).
It has regular tense and voice suffixes, but subject person suffixes.
The verb catu with subject person prefixes [->]

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---------------------------
|    | 1P   | 2P   | 3P   |
---------------------------
| SG | ti   | tun  | tni  |
---------------------------
| DU | tas  | tā   | tān  |
---------------------------
| PL | tur  | sut  | cru  |
---------------------------
Pronouns and correlatives
Nominative personal pronouns [->]

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---------------------------
|    | 1P   | 2P   | 3P   |
---------------------------
| SG | ma   | ti   | us   |
---------------------------
| DU | mi   | tās  | ur   |
---------------------------
| PL | mu   | tsi  | uti  |
---------------------------
Oblique personal pronouns [->]

Code: Select all

---------------------------
|    | 1P   | 2P   | 3P   |
---------------------------
| SG | mā   | tes  | ust  |
---------------------------
| DU | mār  | tār  | urs  |
---------------------------
| PL | mui  | tri  | usi  |
---------------------------
The oblique personal pronouns function together with genitive preposition as possessive pronouns in possessive constructions.

mrāiu tut mā
mrāiu tut mā
kitten GEN 1SG.OBL
my kitten

The oblique personal pronouns are also used when a pronoun has an apposition.

mā, cātna
mā cātna
1SG.OBL
I, a human

A table of correlatives [->]

Code: Select all

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|                   | Question | Indication | Indefinite | Universal | Negative  |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Quality           | cui      | tar        | piri       | spi       | nit cui   |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Reason            | cupa     | tapa       | pira cupa  | siapa     | nicapa    |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Time              | cugsi    | tagsi      | pira cugsi | usir      | nit cugsi |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Place             | curu     | tamia      | pira curu  | spimru    | nimia     |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Manner            | cnās     | tanās      | pirnās     | sipanās   | ninās     |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Association       | crii     | tut pa     | tut rapa   | srii      | nirii     |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Thing/Individual  | cun      | tun        | pirun      | siun      | nit un    |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Amount            | custri   | tastri     | pirun      | sistri    | nistri    |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
There is no deixis in demonstratives. The only demonstrative is tun (singular), tunu(duan) and tunmā (plural).

Syntax
The word order is always VSO in transitive clauses and VS in intransitive.

Nirugnimutru cātna mrāiumai.
ni-rugni-mut-ru cātna mrāiu-mai
3SGS-eat-NPST.ACT-3PLO human[NOM.SG] kitten-OBL.PL
A human eats kittens.

Nirugnimutru cātna.
ni-rugni-mut-ru cātna
3SGS-eat-NPST.ACT-3PLO human[NOM.SG]
A human eats.

In ditransitive clauses, the word order is VSRO (R stands for recipient).

Nitrāsmutri cātna rusa mrāiui nasprui.
ni-trās-mut-ri cātna rusa mrāiu-i naspru-i
3SGS-give-3SGO-NPAST.PASS human[NOM.SG] DAT kitten-OBL.SG mouse-OBL.SG
A human gives the kitten a mouse.

The language is pro-drop for both subject and object because both subject and object person are expressed by the affixes on the verb.

Pirugnimutpti.
pi-rugni-mut-pti
1SGS-eat-NPST.ACT-2SGO
I eat thee.

For emphasis, the affixes are reduplicated.

Pipirugnimutpti.
pi~pi-rugni-mut-pti
1SGS~1SGS-eat-NPST.ACT-2SGO
I eat thee.

Pirugnimutptipti.
pi-rugni-mut-pti~pti
1SGS-eat-NPST.ACT-2SGO-2SGO
I eat thee.

Pipirugnimutptipti.
pi~pi-rugni-mut-pti~pti
1SGS~1SGS-eat-NPST.ACT-2SGO-2SGO
I eat thee.

Negation is expressed by putting the particle nam at the beginning of a clause.

Nam pirugnimutru cātnamai.
nam pi-rugni-mut-ru cātna-mai
NEG 1SGS-eat-NPST.ACT-3PLO human-OBL.PL
I don't eat humans.

The yes/no questions are formed by putting the yes/no particle mu at the beginning of a clause.

Mu timut cātna?
mu tim-ut cātna
Q be.1SG-NPST.ACT human[NOM.SG]
Am I a human?

Mu pirugnimutru mrāiumai.
mu pi-rugni-mut-ru mrāiu-mai
Q 1SGS-eat-NPST.ACT-3PLO kitten-OBL.PL
Do I eat kittens?

Rāi.
rāi
yes
Yes.

Nam.
nam
no
No.

Other questions are formed by placing the appropriate question correlative on the beginning of the clause.

Subordinate clauses
Disclaimer: This section may make no sense because I learned it in school.

Predicate subordinate clause
If a predicate consists of a verb and a non-verb(such as "This language is bad.) them the non-verb can become a clause of its own introduced by conjunction tas. The predicate clause follows the verb part of a predicate.

Timut cātna.
tim-ut cātna
be.1SG-NPST.ACT human[NOM.SG]
I am a human.

Timut tas tnimut cātna.
ti-mut tas tni-mut cātna
be.1SGS-NPST.ACT CONJ be.3SGS-NPST.ACT human[NOM.SG]
I am what is a human.(my best try at translating this)

Subject subordinate clause
A subject subordinate clause is, as its name tells, a subject of the main clause. This type of clause can be before the main clause and after the predicate of the main clause.It is introduced by conjunction.

Cup tnimut cātna, tnimut cātna.
cup tni-mut cātna | tni-mut cātna
CONJ be.3SGS-NPST.ACT human | be.3SGS-NPST.ACT human[NOM.SG]
Who is a human, he/she is a human.

Tnimut cātna cup tnimut cātna.
tni-mut cātna cup tni-mut cātna
be.3SGS-NPST.ACT human[NOM.SG] CONJ be.3SGS-NPST.ACT human
Who is a human, he/she is a human.

Object subordinate clause
An object subordinate clause is, as its name tells, an object of the main clause. This type of clause can be before the main clause and after the predicate of the main clause.It is introduced by conjunction cua.

Pituasg cua ptān tāmut rirs.
pi-tuasg cua ptān tā-mut rirs
1SGS-hope | CONJ FUT be.2DUS-NPST.ACT DEM
I hope that you two won't be there.

Relative subordinate clause
A relative subordinate clause describes its head noun as an adjective. It's introduced by a conjunction cipu. It follows the head noun.

mrāiu pimu
mrāiu pimu
kitten brown
a brown kitten

mrāiu cipu tnimut pimu
mrāiu cipu tnimut pimu
kitten CONJ be.3SGS-NPST.ACT brown[NOM.SG]
a kitten which is brown

Appositional subordinate clause
An appositional subordinate clause functions, as its name tells, as the apposition of the head noun. It follows the head noun. It is introduced by same conjunction as relative clause and is basically the same.

Runtun, ciarpa.
runtun ciarpa
London city
London, a city.

Runtun, cipu tnimut ciarpa.
runtun | cipu tni-mut ciarpa
London | CONJ be.3SGS-NPST.ACT city[NOM.SG]
London, which is a city.

Adverbial clauses
Adverbial clause of place
An adverbial clause of place describes a place of an event described by a verb. It follows the verb and it is introduced by conjunction tamia.

Pipipamut tamia nrupipamut cātnamā rip.
pi-pipa-mut | tamia nru-pipa-mut cātna-mā rip
1SGS-live-NPST.ACT | CONJ 3PLS-live-NPST.ACT human-NOM.PL other
I live where other people live.

Adverbial clause of time
An adverbial clause of time describes a time of an event described by a verb. It follows the verb and it is introduced by conjunction tagsi.

Pisaiutganrāa tagsi nitiumā sai.
pi-saiutgan-rāa | tagsi ni-tiu-mā sai
1SGS-sun.expose-PAST.PASS | CONJ 3SGS-shine-PAST.ACT sun[NOM.SG]
I sunbathed when the sun was shining. (lit. "I was exposed to sun when the sun shined.")

Adverbial clause of manner
An adverbial clause of manner describes a manner of an event described by a verb. It follows the verb and it is introduced by conjunction tanās.

Nam pipamutrāaru carati stratmai tanās pitimanrāaru carati.
nam pi-pamut-rāa-ru ca-rati strat-mai | tanās pi-timan-rāa-ru ca-rati
NEG 1SGS-allow-PAST.PASS-3PLO INF-do thing-OBL.PL | CONJ 1SGS-want-PAST.PASS-3PLO INF-do
I was never allowed to do things as I wanted to do them.

The result and purpose clauses work the same.

Adverbial conditional clauses
An adverbial clause of manner is used to talk about a possible or counterfactual situation and its consequences. It follows the verb and it is introduced by conjunction acu. They can be before the main clause or be after the predicate of the main clause.

Acu sāpipamut, nam tāmut mutu.
acu sā-pipa-mut | nam tā-mut mut-u
CONJ 3DUS-live-NPST.ACT | NEG be.2DUS-NPST.ACT dead-NOM.DU
If you two live, you two are not dead.

Nam tāmut mutu acu sāpipamut.
nam tā-mut mut-u | acu sā-pipa-mut
NEG be.2DUS-NPST.ACT dead-NOM.DU | CONJ 3DUS-live-NPST.ACT
You two are not dead if you two live.

Adverbial clauses of reason
An adverbial clause of reason describes a reason of an event described by a verb. It follows the verb and it is introduced by conjunction tapa.

Timā ringa tapa pitimāsrāa.
ti-mā ringa | tapa pi-timās-rāa
be.1SGS-PAST.ACT happy[NOM.SG] | CONJ 1SGS-award-PAST.PASS
I was happy because I was awarded.

Words
1. sir - time
2. mrias - place
3. ringa - happy
4. catimās - to award
5. mut - dead
6. capipa - to live
7. capamut - to allow
8. carati - to do
9. strat - thing
10. catiman - to want
11. casaiutgan - to sunbathe (lit. to be exposed to sun)
12. catiu - to shine
13. capipa - to live
14. cātna - human
15. Runtun - London
16. ciarpa - town, city
17. catu - to be
18. mrāiu - kitten
19. pimu - brown
20. catuasg - to hope
21. rip - other
22. curugni - to eat
23. sapār - evil
24. mama - mother
25. stun - father
26. mamac - grandma
27. stuntun - grandpa
28. titasra - aunt
29. sptan - niece
30. sptana - nephew
31. prānsuna - brother
32. prānsun - sister
33. sina - son
34. crit - daughter
35. ruprup - dog
36. cascar - to find
37. siip - bird
38. stast - sand
39. trapis - grass
40. stapru - tree
41. catiāntri -to grow
42. tiān - harmony
43. cippa - cloud
44. caissirt - to cut
45. caustcu - to dream
46. pātrā - red
47. gase - house
48. capilgu - to walk
49. nuga - leg
50. catristi - to sit
51. rutān - language

I've finished!
Last edited by Click on 04 Jul 2012 11:17, edited 10 times in total.

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Batrachus
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Re: Speedlanging

Post by Batrachus » 02 Jul 2012 20:40

This is a rare opportunity for me to make a complete conlang because it's hard to lose interest in few hours...
EDIT: And one day.

Phonology

[t c k θ ç x n ŋ l a i u] <t c k th ch kh n ŋ l a i u>

Allophony:
Every oral stop has its fricative counterpart, which is used at the end of word, and before stop of another place of articulation.

Pairs:
t - th
c - ch
k - kh

No diphtongs.

n becomes ŋ before k.

Allophony is shown in orthography.

Stress is ...01010102 on every word.

Syllable structure:
Must start with at least one consonant. If a non-oral-stop consonant is between other two non-same consonants, it become syllabic. Consonants are statistically more frequent.

Grammar

There are three kinds od affixes:
  • postfix
  • infix, which is inserted before last phoneme of root.
  • interfix
Word order is always SVOD, those four are merged to one word by interfix . Adjectives, adverbs and genitive are after this construction.

Negative is made by -th at end of the construction, question by -kh.

Language is agglutinative.

Nouns a adjectives

Numbers:
SG Ø
DU -t
PL -k

Cases:
NOM -n-
ACC -t-
DAT -c-
GEN -l-

Defniteness (right to case infix)
DEF -a-
INDEF Ø
CON -u-

-ŋ- is used to mark it has an adjective or adverb.
If third and moreth level is just right previous level.

Verbs

Time:
PAST -n-
PRES Ø
FUT -ch-
EXTREME (very past or very future) -th-

Imperative is made by future time and second person on the subject.

Mood (right to time):
IND Ø
ENER -i-
POT -a-

Voice:
ACT Ø
PAS -ŋ

Gerund is made by -a.

Vocabulary
I: naku
thou: laŋu
he: tinti
(Plural personal pronouns are made by plural affix.)

Nonpersonal pronouns
no- -ath
some- -an
any- -ach
every- -al
demonstrative -au
(asking)- -
(relative)- -a

-thing/one k-
-where tun-
-why ch-
-when t-
-how ŋ-

Preposition infixes are left to case ones.
at -tun-
in -ku-
from-at -ttun-
from-in -thku-
to-at -khtun-
into -kku-
on -ta-
onto -khta-
under -imu-

human: khan
man: thu
woman: naka
child: tuch
elder, old: khulu
water: thŋl
ground: khu
sky: tana
air: tii
sun: kan
moon: ŋalu
black: tul
red: kiki
yellow: khŋ
blue: nuth
white: kalka
tree: tuthl
grass instance: thmil
pig: tuthu
puma: kamach
lizard: chulla
frog: klakh
wolf: thuthu
bird: liŋli
hummingbird: thiiŋ
eagle: lamul
fish: tith
insect instance: kith
house: nakhtal
wood: tulkhu
leaf: theni
head: nakha
arm: tkhalu
hand: nith
leg: taka
foot: thuŋ
torso: nakhi
eye: laŋku
mouth: tui
ear: khlth
hair instance: palla
tongue: thul
big: nakha
small: nthi
god, holy: naata

to be: nai
to walk: kikal
to stay: nath
to lie: kiti
to talk: latlu
to eat: thka
to drink: ŋiŋi
to urinate: kikli
to create: katlath
to hunt: taul
to sleep: naakh
to accomplish: lanu

today: natu

1: tkh
2: nunu
3: khal
4: kŋka
5: kna
6: knla
7: tatu
8: thaŋ
9: naku
10: nau
11: nalu
12: naununu
13: naukhal
14: naukŋka
15: naukna
16: nauknla
17: nautatu
18: nauthaŋ
19: nunuchnaukch
20: nunuchnau
30: khalchnau
40: kŋkachnau
50: knachnau
60: knlachnau
70: tatuchnau
80: thaŋchnau
90: nakuchnau
100: nauchnau

Serial numbers are like adjectives.

Examples

I'm home today.
Naknuaŋnachi nakhtakual natu.
Nak(n)u-aŋ-na(ch)i nakhta(ku)(a)l natu.
[naˌknuaŋˌnaçi ˌnaxtakuˌal naˈtu]
I.NOM-be.FUT in.house.DEF today

His eyes are blue.
Laŋkŋnutaŋnaiaŋnuth tinti.
Laŋk(ŋ)(n)u-t-aŋ-nai-aŋ-nu(t)th tinti
[laŋkˌŋ̩nuˌtaŋnaˌiaŋˌnutθ tinˈti]
eye.has_adj.NOM.DU-be-blue.ADJ his

White Eagle will be father of five children.
Lamuŋnlaŋnachiaŋthŋtuu Kalka khulu knŋlua tulchkh.
Lamu(ŋ)(n)l-aŋ-na(ch)i-aŋ-th(ŋ)(t)(u)u Kalka khulu knŋ(l)(u)a tu(l)ch-kh.
[laˌmuŋn̩ˌlaŋnaˌçiaŋˌθŋ̩tuː ˌkalka ˌxulu kˌn̩ŋluˌa tulˈç̩x]
Eagle.has_adj.NOM-be.FUT-man.has_adj.ACC.CON White old five.GEN.CON child.PL

Why did you pee on the holy tree?!
Chaŋ laŋnuaŋkiklni tuthŋkhtaul naata?!
Ch-aŋ laŋ(n)u-aŋ-kikl(n)i tuth(ŋ)(kh-ta)(u)l naata?!
[ˌçaŋ laŋˌnuaŋˌkikl̩ˌni tuθˌŋ̩xtaˌul naːˈta]
why.QUEST thou.NOM-urinate.PAST tree.has_adj.to.on.DEF holy

Go sleep.
Laŋnuaŋkikachl naakkukha
Laŋ(n)u-aŋ-kika(ch)l naa(k-ku)kh-a
[ˌlaŋnuˌaŋkiˌkaçl̩ ˌnaːkːuˈxa]
thou.NOM-walk.FUT sleep.to.in.GER

He will do that!
Tintniaŋlachinuaŋkatu!
Tint(n)i-aŋ-la(ch)(i)nu-aŋ-k-a(t)u!
[ˌtintniˌaŋlaˌçinuˌaŋkaˈtu]
he.NOM-accomplish.FUT.ENER-DEM.THING.ACC
Last edited by Batrachus on 03 Jul 2012 19:12, edited 4 times in total.
:ces: Native
:slk: Mutually intelligibile with native language
:eng: Almost fluent
:esp: Little
:deu: Little more
:epo: Everybody can speak it!
:con: Speedlang

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Batrachus
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Re: Speedlanging

Post by Batrachus » 02 Jul 2012 20:43

I hope it's not too late.
:ces: Native
:slk: Mutually intelligibile with native language
:eng: Almost fluent
:esp: Little
:deu: Little more
:epo: Everybody can speak it!
:con: Speedlang

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Re: Speedlanging

Post by Click » 02 Jul 2012 20:59

No, it isn't too late. This thread is still younger than a day.

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Batrachus
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Re: Speedlanging

Post by Batrachus » 02 Jul 2012 21:06

Oh god. It seems my brain is too tired today.
:ces: Native
:slk: Mutually intelligibile with native language
:eng: Almost fluent
:esp: Little
:deu: Little more
:epo: Everybody can speak it!
:con: Speedlang

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Re: Speedlanging

Post by Click » 02 Jul 2012 21:16

My brain is cooked. It's really hot here. :mrred:
Last edited by Click on 30 Oct 2015 22:29, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Speedlanging

Post by nmn » 03 Jul 2012 09:17

ok, we have entries. so now what?

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Re: Speedlanging

Post by Click » 03 Jul 2012 10:41

Nothing. If you want, develop your speedlang further on your computer or in a separate thread. [;)]

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Re: Speedlanging

Post by Batrachus » 03 Jul 2012 13:24

We could make a next round as a competition.
:ces: Native
:slk: Mutually intelligibile with native language
:eng: Almost fluent
:esp: Little
:deu: Little more
:epo: Everybody can speak it!
:con: Speedlang

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Re: Speedlanging

Post by Click » 03 Jul 2012 13:41

Yes, of course. Can someone other than me organise it?

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Re: Speedlanging

Post by nmn » 03 Jul 2012 14:48

Im willing to, if others agree. Just say when you'll have free time. Also, for how long - 1, 2, 3 days?

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Re: Speedlanging

Post by Click » 03 Jul 2012 18:12

I suggest two days.

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Re: Speedlanging

Post by nmn » 03 Jul 2012 18:30

Waiting for some more input; as for now, the start is scheduled for 5th of July.

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Re: Speedlanging

Post by Batrachus » 03 Jul 2012 18:44

Two are ideal.
:ces: Native
:slk: Mutually intelligibile with native language
:eng: Almost fluent
:esp: Little
:deu: Little more
:epo: Everybody can speak it!
:con: Speedlang

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Re: Speedlanging

Post by Click » 04 Jul 2012 10:24

I'll do another speedlang.

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