Germanic Esperanto

A forum for all topics related to constructed languages
Post Reply
wisteriarose
rupestrian
rupestrian
Posts: 19
Joined: 10 Oct 2010 16:02

Germanic Esperanto

Post by wisteriarose » 10 Oct 2010 16:09

Does anyone know if there is a auxlang that in basically equivalent to Esperanto is easiness but has a more Germanic (preferably West) sound to it? This is because I really dislike Esperanto because it sounds like an awkward mix of Spanish and Italian ... Thanks! :)

User avatar
bananabrains
rupestrian
rupestrian
Posts: 12
Joined: 10 Oct 2010 18:09

Re: Germanic Esperanto

Post by bananabrains » 10 Oct 2010 18:31

Basically you're saying that you'd like a language that is a mash of Germanic languages, or one that is a mash of different languages with an emphasis on Germanic? If you Google for "Germanic conglangs" or "Germanic based conlangs" you might be able to find something.

User avatar
CMunk
greek
greek
Posts: 871
Joined: 12 Aug 2010 14:47
Location: Denmark
Contact:

Re: Germanic Esperanto

Post by CMunk » 10 Oct 2010 19:19

Well, we're creating one on this very forum in the thread "Collaborative germanic auxlang". Other than that I think I saw one called 'Folkspraak' on the internet at one point.
Native: :dan: | Fluent: :uk: | Less than fluent: :deu:, :jpn:, :epo: | Beginner: Image, :fao:, :non:
Creating: :con:Jwar Nong, :con:Mhmmz

wisteriarose
rupestrian
rupestrian
Posts: 19
Joined: 10 Oct 2010 16:02

Re: Germanic Esperanto

Post by wisteriarose » 10 Oct 2010 20:03

bananabrains wrote:Basically you're saying that you'd like a language that is a mash of Germanic languages, or one that is a mash of different languages with an emphasis on Germanic? If you Google for "Germanic conglangs" or "Germanic based conlangs" you might be able to find something.
Thanks for the suggestion! I've already tried it, but most are way too complicated and not aux-y (lol). I wanted something easy like an auxlang.

And yes! I've seen the collaborative Germanic Auxlang on the forums, and I'm excited for it, but it's kind of undeveloped. Maybe soon, when they make it more user-friendly, I'll try it?

Thanks!:D

User avatar
bananabrains
rupestrian
rupestrian
Posts: 12
Joined: 10 Oct 2010 18:09

Re: Germanic Esperanto

Post by bananabrains » 10 Oct 2010 20:25

Here's the link to Folkspraak.

I just Googled "Germanic auxlangs", and in addition to Folkspraak (above), I found a few links that might help you. I'm no Germanics expert (Romance is how I roll), but here they are:

This page has a bunch of auxlang links. Folkspraak seems to be only purely Germanic one, though.

Volapük apparently borrows some words from French, but relies heavily on English and German.

And here's the link to the search results, there are some that seem like they could be helpful starting points and might warrant a bit of searching.

wisteriarose
rupestrian
rupestrian
Posts: 19
Joined: 10 Oct 2010 16:02

Re: Germanic Esperanto

Post by wisteriarose » 10 Oct 2010 21:18

bananabrains wrote:Here's the link to Folkspraak.

I just Googled "Germanic auxlangs", and in addition to Folkspraak (above), I found a few links that might help you. I'm no Germanics expert (Romance is how I roll), but here they are:

This page has a bunch of auxlang links. Folkspraak seems to be only purely Germanic one, though.

Volapük apparently borrows some words from French, but relies heavily on English and German.

And here's the link to the search results, there are some that seem like they could be helpful starting points and might warrant a bit of searching.
Thanks so much! hehe that's really helpful!!

roninbodhisattva
moderator
moderator
Posts: 1793
Joined: 15 Aug 2010 19:03
Location: California
Contact:

Re: Germanic Esperanto

Post by roninbodhisattva » 12 Oct 2010 01:44

There's Jameld...though that isn't a auxlang. It's just a Germanic conlang. It's fun, though.

User avatar
gyrus
rupestrian
rupestrian
Posts: 11
Joined: 16 Aug 2010 10:42
Location: ŝlime

Re: Germanic Esperanto

Post by gyrus » 14 Oct 2010 17:36

Esperanto does has quite a few Germanic words in it, although it is mainly Romance, and some of them aren't completely obvious.

Some examples: knabo, hundo, ŝtono, ŝerco, ŝlosi, ŝvebi, etc.
:eng: :fra: :deu: :jpn: :epo: :zho: :esp:

User avatar
Lambuzhao
korean
korean
Posts: 7814
Joined: 13 May 2012 01:57

Re: Germanic Esperanto

Post by Lambuzhao » 17 May 2012 03:32

Extremely interesting! Folkspraak a definite font of inspiration for such a venture. Also worth looking into is Elias Molee's "Nu Teutonish" (a.k.a. Tutonish). You can find it as a free E-book in Google Books. Also check out his "Pure Saxon English" which starts off like a version of Anglish, but then he continues on to sow ideas which later become Tutonish. Also in Google Books.

Prinsessa
runic
runic
Posts: 3226
Joined: 07 Nov 2011 14:42

Re: Germanic Esperanto

Post by Prinsessa » 17 May 2012 12:22

I used to contribute to Folkspraak a bit back in the days (it's what got me started in conlanging), but these days I usually only go there once every other month or so, and I only see messages about recent news and that kind of stuff. Nothing on the language. It seems to be a dying project.

Nonetheless, my time spent there eventually lead to my own 'dialect' of the language, and I kind of like it. I could post stuff some day.

Solarius
roman
roman
Posts: 1196
Joined: 30 Aug 2010 00:23

Re: Germanic Esperanto

Post by Solarius » 18 May 2012 15:25

Why do you dislike Esperanto's sound?
Check out Ussaria!

User avatar
Lambuzhao
korean
korean
Posts: 7814
Joined: 13 May 2012 01:57

Re: Germanic Esperanto

Post by Lambuzhao » 23 May 2012 03:10

I disliked the sound of Muzzy speaking Esperanto.
William Shatner speaking Esperanto is passable, though, as long as you like William Shatner.

Prinsessa
runic
runic
Posts: 3226
Joined: 07 Nov 2011 14:42

Re: Germanic Esperanto

Post by Prinsessa » 23 May 2012 06:10

Skógvur wrote:I used to contribute to Folkspraak a bit back in the days (it's what got me started in conlanging), but these days I usually only go there once every other month or so, and I only see messages about recent news and that kind of stuff. Nothing on the language. It seems to be a dying project.

Nonetheless, my time spent there eventually lead to my own 'dialect' of the language, and I kind of like it. I could post stuff some day.
I should add that mine is more like a Germanic lingua franca rather than a Germanic Esperanto; it has the common Germanic irregularities, to feel natural to a Germanic speaker. The grammar is a bit like Dutch, but slightly more simplified, although placement of verbs follows English and Scandinavian rather than Dutch and German.

The phonology is as follows:

/aː a ɛː ɛ iː ɪ uː u ɔː ɔ yː y/
/p t k b d ɡ f s h x r l m n j w ʍ/

Don't even consider realising /r/ as [ɹ].

Et war ein kald dag. De mann hafd niht funden sin hatt ond hes haufd fraus nu inn de wind, doh he hafd ein halskled, dat he nu band rund et.

User avatar
Lambuzhao
korean
korean
Posts: 7814
Joined: 13 May 2012 01:57

Re: Germanic Esperanto

Post by Lambuzhao » 23 May 2012 18:46

Skógvur wrote:
Skógvur wrote:I used to contribute to Folkspraak a bit back in the days (it's what got me started in conlanging), but these days I usually only go there once every other month or so, and I only see messages about recent news and that kind of stuff. Nothing on the language. It seems to be a dying project.

Nonetheless, my time spent there eventually lead to my own 'dialect' of the language, and I kind of like it. I could post stuff some day.
I should add that mine is more like a Germanic lingua franca rather than a Germanic Esperanto; it has the common Germanic irregularities, to feel natural to a Germanic speaker. The grammar is a bit like Dutch, but slightly more simplified, although placement of verbs follows English and Scandinavian rather than Dutch and German.

The phonology is as follows:

/aː a ɛː ɛ iː ɪ uː u ɔː ɔ yː y/
/p t k b d ɡ f s h x r l m n j w ʍ/

Don't even consider realising /r/ as [ɹ].

Et war ein kald dag. De mann hafd niht funden sin hatt ond hes haufd fraus nu inn de wind, doh he hafd ein halskled, dat he nu band rund et.
Dear Skógvur:

Be so good as to post more, Folkspraakdrottin! And here's a quick mock-up of what your story would look like in Elias Molee's NiuTeutonish (a Germanic Union Language):

Niuteutonish:
Et var een kold dag. do man had nit findn sin hat en hio hovd friesn nu in du vind, omshon hi had een *halskleed, daad he nu bindn om et.

*halskleed - his glossary has hals and kleed, and they both mean what you would expect.
Molee levelled all (99.4%) past tenses to strong suffix -n. Virtually no strong verb vowel change though.
It's a google-book now, so check it out, at least as a "great-aunt" language to what we are investigating.

A Sadraas version is on the way!

Lambuzhao

User avatar
Lambuzhao
korean
korean
Posts: 7814
Joined: 13 May 2012 01:57

Re: Germanic Esperanto

Post by Lambuzhao » 23 May 2012 23:37

After taking my nose off the page, as it were, and giving a second glance,

Skogvurspraak:
Et war ein kald dag. De mann hafd niht funden sin hatt ond hes haufd fraus nu inn de wind, doh he hafd ein halskled, dat he nu band rund et.


Niuteutonish:
Et var een kold dag. do man had nit findn sin hat en hio hovd friesn nu in du vind, omshon hi had een *halskleed, daad he nu bindn om et.

One really amazing thing to note is how conservative the idea of a Germanic conlang is. Granted, there are some substantial differences in preposition & adverb choice, and how the articles should look, and how far to take analytic change in verbs. Still, Skogvur's version (2012) and Molee's version (1928) are separated by almost a century in time, and yet have some remarkably similar solutions as to what a Germanic altlang should look, sound and feel like.

Glossopoetic convergent evolution!

Prinsessa
runic
runic
Posts: 3226
Joined: 07 Nov 2011 14:42

Re: Germanic Esperanto

Post by Prinsessa » 29 May 2012 13:13

This is beautiful!

User avatar
Lambuzhao
korean
korean
Posts: 7814
Joined: 13 May 2012 01:57

Re: Germanic Esperanto

Post by Lambuzhao » 29 Dec 2012 22:19

Skogvurspraak:
Et war ein kald dag. De mann hafd niht funden sin hatt ond hes haufd fraus nu inn de wind, doh he hafd ein halskled, dat he nu band rund et.


Niuteutonish:
Et var een kold dag. do man had nit findn sin hat en hio hovd friesn nu in du vind, omshon hi had een *halskleed, daad he nu bindn om et.

Sadrås:
Ves hit än calt Tage. fainde nej der Mann hem Sesbë ent frysed hem Kopf ë yë Uindte, hœbeðit haffed he ïne Nöpsekûlöt, mitünj sjbainde he nœ ründt.

NB: In Sadrås, Sesbë "hat", and (Nöp)sekûlöt "scarf, shawl" are loanwords from Rozwi.

I wonder what this would look like in Ƿæſtlagȝarſpracın :?:

Gœde Ötrjole ent Nœgjærn!

User avatar
Lambuzhao
korean
korean
Posts: 7814
Joined: 13 May 2012 01:57

Re: Germanic Esperanto

Post by Lambuzhao » 29 Dec 2012 22:46

And from Roninbodhisattva's suggestion, I tweaked out a version in Jameld (may the Jameld Gods be merciful!)

Jameld:
Et wä an kalt däi. Te monn na fund eü hod und eü chadof früz inte Wint, tügo e aa an tsaal (*heltskléth), tes jüji e bond böyäd et.

*NB: I used the simple preterite forms for verbs above, but I could also have used the perfect findiave , frezave, *avave/avaa, and bindave, respectively.

:mrgreen:

Post Reply