My hatelang: Omlűt

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Re: My hatelang: Omlűt

Post by Creyeditor » 03 Jun 2017 21:57

21. Lexical metaphors
Several conceptual metaphors influence the lexicon and the meanings of words and phrases. The most common ones are listed here with some examples.


FRIENDS are RELATIVES
Kinship terms are often used for friends and acquaintance, but also for people that are in a different social relations with EGO. They encode distance as well as hierarchies. Because military and work is very important in Bólsks, such social relations are often coded the same way.
uln (n) can either mean cousin or friend or colleague.
kans (n) means brother as well as best friend or brother-in-arms. Note that the relation is closer than uln.
makt (n) - father, boss, immediate superior

ORDERLINESS is POSITIVE
The general terms for 'good' (adj) often also express a sense orderliness or harmony.
ims (adj) - friendly, harmonous, beloved, orderly
splurn (adj) - regular, orderly, good
khand (v) - to wash, to clean, to tidy up, to repair
szekhand to tidy up for an event, to prepare

INDIVIDUALITY is NEGATIVE
Individual, non-conforming behaviour is often used as a hyperonym for all unwanted or unusual behaviour. It always has a negative connotation.
rhupt (v) - to pursue one's dreams (pejorative)
ugrhupt (n) - someone who follows his dreams (pejorative)
zhabt (n) - lunatic, madman, outcast, inhabitant of a mental home

SOCIAL INTERACTION is VIOLENCE
This part might be NSFW.
Spoiler:
swirk (v) - to stab so., to have sex with s.o. from a male POV
erswirk (v) - to stab so. to death, to rape so.o.
byamf (v) - to strangle s.o.., to have sex with s.o. from a female POV
szib (v) - to flog someone, to torture someone, to interrogate someone
LANGUAGES are CONTAINERS
Languages are thought of as containers, where you can take words out of to use them. Words might also be thought of as smaller containers that can be changed to fit into other containers/sentences.
am (adp) - out of a container, in a language
zhorfstrasp (f) - morphology, lit. word-bending
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Re: My hatelang: Omlűt

Post by Creyeditor » 27 Jun 2017 18:52

The next post will either be about dialects or about diachrony, btw.
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Re: My hatelang: Omlűt

Post by Nachtuil » 27 Jun 2017 22:12

I like the metaphors of your previous post. I think it is awesome you've considered such things for this language. It may be a bit revealing about the mentality of the speakers. The orderliness=good thing is especially interesting and easy to visualise happening. Friends as relatives makes a lot of sense too.

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Re: My hatelang: Omlűt

Post by Vlürch » 29 Jun 2017 00:26

Creyeditor wrote:hands\-F.ACC.DU
I don't know why, but I started laughing when I saw this. Like, obviously it makes sense, but... I don't know, I wasn't thinking about a guy with three hands when I read it, but now I am. Do languages with a dual usually have hands and feet in the dual or plural? What about eyes, nostrils, ears and lips? Why am I even thinking about this?

Anyway, awesome language. Makes me want to try seriously doing something I'd hate, too.

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Re: My hatelang: Omlűt

Post by Iyionaku » 29 Jun 2017 06:33

Vlürch wrote:
Creyeditor wrote:hands\-F.ACC.DU
I don't know why, but I started laughing when I saw this. Like, obviously it makes sense, but... I don't know, I wasn't thinking about a guy with three hands when I read it, but now I am. Do languages with a dual usually have hands and feet in the dual or plural? What about eyes, nostrils, ears and lips? Why am I even thinking about this?

Anyway, awesome language. Makes me want to try seriously doing something I'd hate, too.
Yep, most languages with dual number use it for pairs, many wouldn't use the dual for two arbitrary hands, for example (just for the pair).
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Re: My hatelang: Omlűt

Post by Creyeditor » 29 Jun 2017 10:08

Nachtuil wrote:I like the metaphors of your previous post. I think it is awesome you've considered such things for this language. It may be a bit revealing about the mentality of the speakers. The orderliness=good thing is especially interesting and easy to visualise happening. Friends as relatives makes a lot of sense too.
Thank you [:)]
It is of course very telling about Bólks. And of course the order thing is a common trope.
Vlürch wrote:
Creyeditor wrote:hands\-F.ACC.DU
I don't know why, but I started laughing when I saw this. [...]
Anyway, awesome language. Makes me want to try seriously doing something I'd hate, too.
I just noticed it would make people laugh even more probably without the D in DUal. [}:D]
Also thank you a lot [:)]

Iyionaku wrote:[...] Yep, most languages with dual number use it for pairs, many wouldn't use the dual for two arbitrary hands, for example (just for the pair).
I wrote:11. Verbal agreement
[...] Dual is used more frequently in verbal conjugation than it is in nominal declension, which sometimes leads to situations where a plural noun might trigger dual agreement. [...]
So I actually used this idea in the language, I just didn't give an example. So you would say an accidental pair of two hands should use plural morphology on the noun and dual agreement on the verb?
Also, sorry for lying about this post.
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Re: My hatelang: Omlűt

Post by Iyionaku » 29 Jun 2017 11:36

Interestingly, all Arab dialects (except the Maroccan dialect) do it the other way round: The dual is fully productive for nouns, but extinct in verbal morphology.
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Re: My hatelang: Omlűt

Post by Creyeditor » 08 Jul 2017 22:42

22. Proto-Northern

Omlűt is a Northern language which means that it is derived from Proto-Northern. The only other Northern language that I made is Kobardon (no documentation on CBB available). I superimposed the language family later, so they are not very closely related. The languages where already distinct *there* before the Great War. Not much is known about Proto-Northern. The following sounds have definitely existed in Proto-Northern. Keep in mind that if a sound is not listed, this does not imply it did not exist. This simply means that it is not reconstructed yet.

*m *n
*b *t *d *k *q
*s *z
*r
*i *u
*ɛ *ə *o
*a

Syllable structure was probably (C)V(C)

Here is a list with the corresponding sounds in Kobardon and Omlűt.
Spoiler:
PN=Proto-Northern, OO=Old Omlűt, OK=Kobardon
PN: *m > OO: m K: ?
PN: *n > OO: m,n,ə̃ K: n
PN: *b > OO: ∅ K: b
PN: *t > OO: t K: r
PN: *d > OO: ? K: d
PN: *k > OO: h K: k
PN: *q > OO: q K: ∅
PN: *s > OO: s,z K: s
PN: *h > OO: h K: ∅
PN: *r > OO: r,∅ K: r
PN: *i > OO: i K: i, u
PN: *u > OO: u K: u, i
PN: *ɛ > OO: ə, ə̃, ai K: ?
PN: *ə > OO: ə, ə̃ K: ∅
PN: *o > OO: iu, u K: o
PN: *a > OO: a K: a, o
And here is a list of sound changes to Old Omlűt (incomplete, SCA2 format). Note the simplification of the vowel system and the lenition of plosives.
Spoiler:
N=mn
L=ɔɛʊ
R=ɔou
V=aeiouəɔɛ
C=bcdfghjklmnpqrstvwxz

k/x/_
n/m/R_
r//N_V
x/h/_
o/eu/#(C)_(C)#
ɛ/ai/#(C)_(C)#
b/w/V_V
ə//_
L/ə/_
N/̃/ə_#
e/i/_
o/u/_
Grammatically the most intriguing fact about is that it had no agreement on verbs, only clitized pronouns. These developed into different agreement patterns in the daughter languages. The pronoun system was very rich, distinguishing several degrees of distance in the third person pronouns, as well as singular, dual and plural plus clusivity. It seems that second person pronouns also had a politeness distinction:

1.SG *kon
2.SG *am, *ra
3.SG.PROX *qa
3.SG.MED *da
3.SG.DIST *uni
1.DU.INCL *asi
1.DU.EXCL *atki
1.DU *sai
2.DU *tam
3.DU *umitɛ
1.PL.INCL *ani
1.PL.EXCL *ar
1.PL *əbi
2.PL *atə, sit
3.PL *satə

Here is the development of the pronoun system in Omlűt
Spoiler:
1.SG *kon > OO: hium > O: \iu-ëm (1SG.IPFV), um (1SG)
2.SG *am > OO: amə > O: \a-ëmë (2SG.PFV)
2.SG.P *ra > ???
3.SG.PROX *qa > OO: qa (3SG) a-(3SG.PFV) > O: qa (3SG), \a (3SG.PFV)
3.SG.MED *da > ?
3.SG.DIST *uni > ?
1.DU.INCL *asi > azi > \ai-së (1DU.INCL.IPFV), ja (1PL.INCL)
1.DU.EXCL *atki > athi > ati (1DU.EXL)
1.DU *sai > sai > \ai-së (1DU.IPFV)
2.DU *tam > tam > tam (2DU)
3.DU *umitɛ > umit (3DU)
1.PL.INCL *ani > ani (1PL.INCL)
1.PL.EXCL *ar > -ar (1PL.EXCL.IPFV) > \a-ër
1.PL *əbi > -ui > \ui-ë (1PL.INCL.IPFV)
2.PL *atə > -at > \a-ët (2PL.IPFV)
3.PL.P: *sit > \i-st (2PL.PFV)
3.PL *satə > \a-st (3PL.PFV)
There is not much constructed nominal morphology for Proto-Northern. It is clear that the language had number marking on nouns and a possessive case. This gives us the following paradigm.

NOM, POSS
SG: *-ɔən, *-(hi)n
PL: *-isu, *-r(au)

That's it for the moment. Next post will probably about Old Omlűt. As always, feedback and questions are very welcome.
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Re: My hatelang: Omlűt

Post by Creyeditor » 12 Aug 2017 23:48

23. Old Omlűt: Part I: Phonology and Nominal Morphology
Old Omlűt is the first attested form of Omlűt. It was a mostly rather agglutinating language with a small vowel inventory, but the consonant inventory was already very similar to modern Omlűt. The most interesting sound changes between Old Omlűt and Omlűt were the Umlauts, that changed the language from being rather agglutinating to being totally introflectional.

Phonology

Old Omlűt contrasted four series of stops: voiceless, aspirated, voiced and breathy voiced. These came in labial, alveolar and velar flavours. Palatals were allophonic and the uvular stop only existed as a voiceless and aspirated one. Fricatives contrasted voiced vs. voiceless and occured with labiodental, alveolar, retroflex and velar POA. Again palatals were only allophonic. /h/ did not distinguish any phonations. The only phonemic sonorant consonants were /m/, /n/ and /r/. Some voiced fricatives acted like sonorant with regards to syllable structure constraints though. The orthography given below is based on the correspondences to modern phonemes.
Spoiler:
Consonant inventory
/m/ /n/
/p/ /t/ [c] /k/ /q/
/pʰ/ <ᵽ> /tʰ/ <ŧ> [cʰ] /kʰ/ <ꝁ> /qʰ/ <ꝗ>
/b/ /d/ [ɟ] /g/
/bʰ/ <ƀ> /dʰ/ <đ> [ɟʰ] /gʰ/ <ǥ>
/f/ /s/ [ʃ] /ʂ/ <ṣ> /x/ <h> /h/ <'>
/v/ /z/ [ʒ] /ʐ/ <ẓ> /ɣ/ <w>
/r/
Before the Umlauts happened, Old Omlűt only showed four vowel positions /i u ə a/. All of these could occur in a nasalized and non-nasalized version. Nasalized vowels were relatively rare. The exact realization seems to already have been dependent on vowels in neighbouring syllables. The schwa is sometimes written as <e> in reconstructions. This can cause confusion with MO /e/ <e>
Spoiler:
Vowel inventory
/i ĩ u ũ/
/ə ə̃ a ã/
Synchronic phonological processes probably included some kind of relatively local vowel assimilation and palatalization before /i/.

Syllable structure included pretty complex consonant clusters. Since there were more obstruents than sonorants a lot of triconsonantal clusters consisted only of obstruents.
Stress was predictabley on the root, but unpredictable in certain disyllabic particles.

Morphology

The most interesting thing about suffixation is that it included full vowels. These correspond to the umlauting suffxies in MO. Some suffixes were only differentiated by the relative position of vowels and consonants in the suffix. These distinctions were neutralized in MO. Another difference from MO is that in OO inflectional prefixes existed. They never included consonants, though, which is why they were lost.
The nominal declensions in OO had similar overall paradigms compared to MO.
Spoiler:

Code: Select all

masculine
   nominative comitative dative accusative
sg  -iste      -te       -ete    -0 
du  -utu       -stua     ua- -t  -sthi
pl  -tu        -su       -hir    -aun 

Code: Select all

feminine
   nominative comitative dative accusative
sg au- -s     -hin       -stua  -0		
du au- -t     -ai        -hĩu   -rau		
pl au- -es    -rau       -stau  -ait		

Code: Select all

neuter
   nominative comitative dative accusative
sg -ẽ         -ste       iu- -t -0
du -ati       -ru        -utu	ai- -t	
pl -su	     -rui       -rau	iu- -s
Here is an example declension:
buzk (f) nation state

Code: Select all

NOM COM DAT ACC
SG  aubuzks  buzk(h)in buzkstua buzk
DU  aubuzkt  buzkai    buzkhĩu  buzkrau
PL  aubuzkes buzkrau   buzkstau buzkait
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Re: My hatelang: Omlűt

Post by Creyeditor » 15 Aug 2017 20:49

24. Old Omlűt: Part II: Verbal Morphology, Particles, Pronouns and Sound changes

The conjugations again already involved similar categories to MO. Note however that prefixes are involved. Also the nasalized a for 1PLI in OO became a placeless nasal in MO. The /h/ in 1SG.IPFV and 2SG.IPFV blocked palatalization.
Spoiler:

Code: Select all

    perfective imperfective
1SG	-eme     -hium	
2SG	-ame     -hit			
3SG	a-       -0		

1DUI  -ese     -shia			
1DUE  -ta      -sai			
2DU   -te      -am		
3DU   -imu     -te	

1PLI  -ã        -ui		
1PLE  ia- -st   -ar		
2PL   i- -st    -at
3PL   a- -st    -sa
The derivational prefixes of MO were originally preverbal/prenominal particles in OO that had an possibly irregular stress pattern on their own. This explains why they have full vowels in MO even though they are prefixes.
Spoiler:
úma - reciprocal activity
íra - verbal intensifier
tʰiu - verbal transitivizer
afí - nominal collectivizer
aʂí - verbal adverb meaning 'before'
ína - transitive verbalizer denominal
atʰí - denominal adjectivizer
usá - deadjectival nominalizer
afú - verbal volitional marker
ug - deverbal agent nominalization
ans - deverbal instrument nominalization
The pronouns in OO also were only phonologically different from MO.
Spoiler:
1.SG um
2.SG it
3.SG qa
1.DUI azi
1.DUE athi
2.DU tam
3.DU umit
1.PLI ani
1.PLE ashitar
2.PL shitat
3.PL sat
But let's also look at the sound changes in some detail. These are traditionally divided into the sound changes before the Umlauts, the sound changes during the Umlauts and the sound changes after the Umlauts. Languages that split of during or after Umlauts are considered dialects of MO, those that split of before the Umlauts are considered separate languages.

The changes before the Umlauts included the loss of nasal vowels. They became placeless nasals in affixes after consonants, but became nV sequences in other contexts. Schwas were deleted in this position. Nasals also assimilated to a preceding consonant.
Spoiler:
SCA2 format
N=
L=bpfvβ
K=kgɣxw
N=mnŋ

/*_N
̃/n/_
Vn/\\/_
n/m/L_
n/ŋ/K_
ə//N_
*//_
Umlauts are traditionally subdivided into primary and secondary Umlauts and progressive and regressive Umlauts. All of them affected the stressed vowel, which mostly just was a root vowel. Progressive Umlauts come from pretonic full vowels, regressive Umlauts from posttonic full vowels. Primary umlauts originally just produced a relatively simple vowel system. The secondary Umlauts complicated the system even more. The specific effects of the vowels on the root have already been mentioned in the first section of this thread, IIRC.

After the Umlauts pretonic vowels were deleted and posttonic vowel (sequences) were reduced to Schwa.
Spoiler:
SCA2 format
V//_'(C)(C)(C)
V//_'(C)(C)(C)
V/ə/'(C)(C)(C)V(ː)(C)(C)(C)_
Palatalization and subsequent i-deletion yielded a set of palatal consonants.
Spoiler:
SCA2 format
U=kgxɣ
P=cɟʃʒ
U/P/_(ʰ)i[V#]
i//P_
Lenition affected only some marked voiceless aspirated plosives. Voiced aspirated plosives were affected without exception. This increased the number of fricatives. The original voiced fricatives where pushed to become approximants in this chain shift. This explains the high number of approximants in MO. Notice that /z/ became /l/ instead of the maybe expected /ɹ/.
Spoiler:
A=βlɹjw
B=bdɟg
W=vzʐʒɣ
Z=vzʒɣ

W/A/_
cʰ/tʃ/_
qʰ/χ/_
Bʰ/Z/_
Metathesis changed the order of glides and vowels, which leads to more complex onset clusters in MO.
Spoiler:
Vj/\\/_[C#]
Vw/\\/_[C#]
The last change was the loss of laryngeals. This affected only OO /h/, but as a chain shift also pulled OO /χ/ to MO /h/.
Spoiler:
h//_
χ/h/_

Next post will probably be about some closely related languages.
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Re: My hatelang: Omlűt

Post by Creyeditor » 13 Nov 2017 21:16

25. Addendum 1: The existential construction
I just noticed that there is actually a lot of stuff missing from this language description. So, surprise, I decided to postpone the post on related languages (I have worked on that a lot, but I am not yet satisfied). So I decided to add some sections about how to express certain basic semantical concepts. This post will be about the existential construction.
The existential construction is expressed by the third person form of the verb 'ki' followed by the thing that exists (I call it pivot). The pivot is always in the nominative and usually occurs without a indefinite article. It can plural, dual or singular. The verb can be in the perfective or imperfective formas well as in the singular or plural.

Ke yáuksës.
ki\a yaks\au-s
be\3.SG.PFV boom\-NOM.SG.F
There had been a boom.

Ki yáuksës.
ki yaks\au-s
be\3.SG.IPFV boom\-NOM.SG.F
There is a boom.

Kest yáukst.
ki\a-st yaks\au-t
be\3.PL.PFV boom\-NOM.DU.F
There had been two explosions.

Kesë yáukst.
ki\a-së yaks\au-t
be\3.PL.IPFV boom\-NOM.DU.F
There are two explosions

There is also another version, where the verb has an intensifier. This version is often used for very general statements or for non-referential noun phrases. The pivot is usually in the singular (as is the verb agreement), but the verb can take imperfective or perfective marking.

Erke yáuksës.
er-ki\a yaks\au-s
very-be\3.SG.PFV boom\-NOM.SG.F
There had been sound.

Erki yáuksës.
er-ki yaks\au-s
very-be\3.SG.IPFV boom\-NOM.SG.F
There is sound.
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Re: My hatelang: Omlűt

Post by Pabappa » 20 Nov 2017 17:21

Wow. I only just now noticed that this thread has been going for 4 years. I'm impressed. I notice early in the thread that you decided you liked some features of Omlűt after all, though, so perhaps that encouraged you to work further on it?
shanoxilt wrote:Does anyone else have a similar project that consists of only features they despise?
Sort of .... when I was young, I went through a phase of hating English, "the language of tricks". I had two concultures, Camia and Wamia, of which Camia was perfect in every way and Wamia was exactly the opposite. Therefore Wamian was a language that embodied all of the characteristics that I hate.

Why I say "sort of", though, is that I kept changing my mind about what I loved, and therefore what I hated. I never made a fully functional language out of Wamian, just a dozen or so completely unrelated sketches. In my late teen years I gave up the Marysuetopia idea and decided that Wamia would still exist, but it would be 100% bad only in the minds of the Camians, and (since they were closely related to each other) the languages would not actually differ that much from an outsider's point of view. I later realized I could just assign Wamia an aboriginal language, totally unrelated to Camian, but that doesnt seem to have the same meaning to me as a language that "was once pure and refined, but turned away and became ugly and debased".

-----

I dislike a lot of my early conlangs, such as Thaoa and Palli, because my tastes have changed over time. But even so it's not that these languages consist entirely of features I dislike, but that the few things I like about them are also present in my newer conlangs, and generally to a much greater extent. I seem to lack the willpower to pursue a language that's "bad on purpose", even if only from my own perspective, based on the many attempts to create a Wamian language, even in my adulthood.
Sorry guys, this one has the worst sting.

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Re: My hatelang: Omlűt

Post by Creyeditor » 20 Nov 2017 20:13

Pabappa wrote:
20 Nov 2017 17:21
Wow. I only just now noticed that this thread has been going for 4 years. I'm impressed. I notice early in the thread that you decided you liked some features of Omlűt after all, though, so perhaps that encouraged you to work further on it?
Actually that was not so much the case. I have some hundred conlang sketches in my conlang folder. Most of them are just very vague sketches. Here is an example of a very vague sketch (NB: I have an implicit non-IPA transcription going on there, therefore IPA was added here in brackets, this was not present in the original file):

Code: Select all

jendzh [jɛndʒ]

í [i]
coj [tʃɔɪ̯]
cí [tʃi]
djí [dʲi]
woj [vɔɪ̯]
cju [tʃʲʊ]

c->tsh
Often I am more interested in working out the details and so I worked most on languages that are not just vague sketches, but already somewhat elaborated. That's why I worked more and more on Omlueuet and it already has a general feel, a general idea, so it is easier to decide on solutions to grammatical problems. Actually I have more information offline than in this thread, but I find it difficult to guess what people are most interested in.
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Re: My hatelang: Omlűt

Post by Creyeditor » 24 Nov 2017 21:05

26. Addendum 2: Possession
So, I worked a bit on possession, because up to now it looked too regular and not elaborated enough. Possession marking is dependent on possessor, possessed and kind of possession

Kinds of possession:
  • ownership
  • part-whole
  • kinship
Kind of possessor/possessed:
  • pronoun
  • def. noun
  • indef. noun
The following schemes are more like guidelines than actual strict rules. The important take home message is that the some combinations are impossible, some are expressed as compounds, some use the comitative construction and some are unmarked.

Ownership

Code: Select all

Possessor\Possessed	pronoun	         def. simple noun	indef. simple noun
pronoun		        COM.pro        	 unmarked NP		COM.pro INDEF NP
def. full noun phrase	impossible 	 COM.NP NP		COM.NP  INDEF NP
indef. full noun phrase	impossible	 INDEF COM.NP NP	INDEF COM.NP INDEF NP
Part-whole

Code: Select all

Possessor\Possessed	pronoun	        def. simple noun        indef. simple noun
pronoun		        COM.pro	        unmarked NP		COM.pro INDEF NP
def. full noun phrase	impossible	DEF compound		INDEF compound
indef. full noun phrase	impossible	DEF compound		INDEF compound
Kinship

Code: Select all

Possessor\Possessed	pronoun	        def. simple noun	indef. simple noun
pronoun		        COM.pro	        unmarked NP		COM.pro INDEF NP
def. full noun phrase	impossible	DEF compound		INDEF compound
indef. full noun phrase	impossible	INDEF COM.NP NP	        INDEF compound
I am too tired right now to produce good examples. I'll post some later in a few days.
So here are the examples for ownership: Note that the possessed is implicit in the first example and the possessor in the second. No compounds yet, the rest is pretty regular.

Umstë
um-stë
1SG-N.SG.COM
'my it'

Smaltn
smalt-N
slave-N.SG.NOM
'(my) slave'

Umstë smaltn un
um-stë smalt-N u-N
1SG-N.SG.COM slave-N.SG.NOM INDEF-N.SG.NOM
'a slave of mine'

Instë smaltn
ins-stë smalt-N
cannbial-N.SG.COM slave-N.SG.NOM
'the slave of the cannibal'

Instë smaltn un
ins-stë smalt-N u-N
cannbial-N.SG.COM slave-N.SG.NOM INDEF-N.SG.NOM
'a slave of the cannibal'

Instë ustë smaltn
ins-stë u-stë smalt-N
cannbial-N.SG.COM INDEF-N.SG.COM slave-N.SG.NOM
'the slave of a cannibal'

Instë ustë smaltn un
ins-stë u-stë smalt-N u-N
cannbial-N.SG.COM INDEF-N.SG.COM slave-N.SG.NOM INDEF-N.SG.NOM
'a slave of a cannibal'

Here is the catch with kinship possession. Anytime you have neither a pronoun possessor nor a pronoun possessed, you get compounding, where only the definitness of the possessed is marked. This leads to some interesting neutralization.

Ensmaktn
ins-makt-N
cannibal-father-N.SG.NOM
'the father of a/the cannibal'

Enskansn un
ins-kans-N u-N
cannibal-brother-N.SG.NOM INDEF-N.SG.NOM
'a brother of a/the cannibal'
Creyeditor
"Thoughts are free."
Produce, Analyze, Manipulate
1 :deu: 2 :eng: 3 :idn: 4 :fra: 4 :esp:
:con: Ook & Omlűt & Nautli languages & Sperenjas
[<3] Papuan languages, Morphophonology, Lexical Semantics [<3]

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Creyeditor
mongolian
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Posts: 4500
Joined: 14 Aug 2012 19:32

Re: My hatelang: Omlűt

Post by Creyeditor » 15 May 2018 23:43

Finally, some information on:
27. Related Languages
I will include here languages that are derived from Proto-O., but did not undergo the defining Umlaut sound change. The ones that did undergo Umlaut are called dialects of Umlueuet and the ones derived from Proto-Northern, but not from Proto-O. are called other Northern languages. Northern languages and Omlueuet dialects will be discusses at some later point. For now, I will just give you a few cognates.

BURN: *qʰuzm: Omlueuet: hulm, De̤tselo: kozm, Pùzīgíne: kúzè, Litsni: ʔirm
COLLECT: *ãʐ: Omlueuet: narh, De̤tselo: õz, Pùzīgíne: àʐè, Litsni: ãz
PEOPLE *buzk: Omlueuet: bulk, De̤tselo: bosk, Pùzīgíne: hūzè, Litsni: bɨrk
SOMETIMES *bʰadʰ: Omlueuet: vaz, De̤tselo: bo̤d, Pùzīgíne: pàt, Litsni: wal
SUN *huzt : Omlueuet: ult, De̤tselo: host, Pùzīgíne: pùzè, Litsni: hirt
Creyeditor
"Thoughts are free."
Produce, Analyze, Manipulate
1 :deu: 2 :eng: 3 :idn: 4 :fra: 4 :esp:
:con: Ook & Omlűt & Nautli languages & Sperenjas
[<3] Papuan languages, Morphophonology, Lexical Semantics [<3]

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