The Yélian language

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Iyionaku
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The Yélian language

Post by Iyionaku » 27 May 2014 12:14

So here is my conlang, which is the - with some distance - widest-elaborated one. It's called the Yélian language.
I didn't write it for a fictive world (although I created one to let my language take place), I wrote it actually for myself.
It has at the moment about 1,000 morphemes, but I create a few more everyday. If anyone read a thread of mine, the conlang I use is this.

So here you go, I hope it's openable, I've used google drive for that.

Phonetics: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzCvXB ... sp=sharing

An overview about the grammar: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzCvXB ... sp=sharing

If there's something illogical, I would like to hear from you [:)]
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eldin raigmore
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Re: The Yélian language

Post by eldin raigmore » 27 May 2014 12:56

The linguistics here looks pretty good; I congratulate and thank you.

But the English and the spelling aren't perfect.

For instance you say "threatened" when I'm pretty sure what you mean is "treated".
And you use "vocals" when I'm pretty sure what you mean is "vowels".

I'd say essentially the same about https://docs.google.com/file/d/0BzCvXBa ... edit?pli=1

You use "lean" where I'm pretty sure you mean "loan". That makes me suspect you did that in the phonetics document, too.

I have a question; Are non-living body-parts, like hair and nails, in the a'-class or the u'-class?

Also: a "gender" is just a concordial noun-class.
If other words have to concord (or agree) with a noun's class, then that class is a gender.
I think your language's noun-class-system is (just barely) still a gender system, even though only the definite articles have to agree with the nouns' classes.

To sum up; I think it's a much better-than-average first effort.
Is it, indeed, a first effort?

Iyionaku
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Re: The Yélian language

Post by Iyionaku » 27 May 2014 13:36

eldin raigmore wrote:
The linguistics here looks pretty good; I congratulate and thank you.

But the English and the spelling aren't perfect.

For instance you say "threatened" when I'm pretty sure what you mean is "treated".
And you use "vocals" when I'm pretty sure what you mean is "vowels".

I'd say essentially the same about https://docs.google.com/file/d/0BzCvXBa ... edit?pli=1

You use "lean" where I'm pretty sure you mean "loan". That makes me suspect you did that in the phonetics document, too.

I have a question; Are non-living body-parts, like hair and nails, in the a'-class or the u'-class?

Also: a "gender" is just a concordial noun-class.
If other words have to concord (or agree) with a noun's class, then that class is a gender.
I think your language's noun-class-system is (just barely) still a gender system, even though only the definite articles have to agree with the nouns' classes.

To sum up; I think it's a much better-than-average first effort.
Is it, indeed, a first effort?
Thanks a lot! Well, if it's a much better-than-average first effort and an average second effort, I'd say it's a first effort... [:D]
But seriously: I used to have a conlang in 5th grade, which was an exact relex of English, and one year later I had another one which was an exact relex of French...
so propably, I think one can call this my first effort.

I've never thought of nails and hairs as un-living, I suppose. The word for "hair" is a'hilan, so it's in the a'-class. However, some dialects treat body parts of any kind as u', but in the standard language it's "a'".

Thanks for critizising my English. I didn't know the word "vowel", but I knew that there was an English word "vocal", so I erroneously thought it would be the same as German "Vokal". Same for "loan word". Treat-threaten, indeed, is kind of awkward. Maybe I was just disconcentrated, thanks for giving me feedback anyway.
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eldin raigmore
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Re: The Yélian language

Post by eldin raigmore » 27 May 2014 14:52

Iyionaku wrote:I didn't know the word "vowel", but I knew that there was an English word "vocal", so I erroneously thought it would be the same as German "Vokal".
The English words "vowel" and "vocal" are, in fact, related to each other (though this is not transparently obvious to the average L1-English-speaker; for instance I had to be told). For instance the English word "intervocalic" means "between vowels".
So I knew what you meant.
(They're probably also related to German "Vokal".)
Last edited by eldin raigmore on 27 May 2014 19:24, edited 1 time in total.

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Imralu
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Re: The Yélian language

Post by Imralu » 27 May 2014 16:54

Love between lovers is iavæ (presumably you meant to specify 'heterosexual lovers'), but iávoda between homosexual lovers? What would happen if one homosexual turned to another and said "I iavæ you"?

Also, how are the imperative infinitive (eg. reyavar) and the conjunctive II infinitive (eg. reyvam) used? Conjunctive is generally called subjunctive in English. And I'm guessing you called in conjunctive II after the German Konjunktiv II because it has a similar meaning, but if your language only has one type of subjunctive, you don't need to give it a number.
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Iyionaku
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Re: The Yélian language

Post by Iyionaku » 27 May 2014 17:51

Imralu wrote:Love between lovers is iavæ (presumably you meant to specify 'heterosexual lovers'), but iávoda between homosexual lovers? What would happen if one homosexual turned to another and said "I iavæ you"?

Also, how are the imperative infinitive (eg. reyavar) and the conjunctive II infinitive (eg. reyvam) used? Conjunctive is generally called subjunctive in English. And I'm guessing you called in conjunctive II after the German Konjunktiv II because it has a similar meaning, but if your language only has one type of subjunctive, you don't need to give it a number.
iavæ and iávoda are acually nouns, the verbs would be iava and iavodea. But I take your point. I suppose it just won't happen because the words have only those meaning and are only that way useable in the language... In Yélian (because homosexuals have been equal for a very longer time), the words act this way - as you wouldn't say in English, for example, "I see TV", because the verb "to see" doesn't include "to watch". I'm a bit poor in words for such complicated themes, so I hope it was understandable [:)]

The imperative has the use, as it is necessary when you want to say "I want him to work". Then you have to say Re tem ivatei tivelavar. The same with "I force you", "I order you", "I forbid you", etc.

Thanks for asking after the conjunctive, because I've forgotten to write something. There is actually a conjunctive I, but it is build with a prefix di, so you're right, I'll change that.
Actually, the infintive of conjunctive II is the only modern form today. You could say: "I would work" which will be "Re ditivelai", and "I would have worked" would be either "Re ditivelvam" (with the conjunctive infinitive), or "Re tivelvai", not "Re ditivelvai", as I have written. Maybe I was tired... thanks for that.
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