Bløjhvåtterskyll: conlang with more than 1500 words!

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Bløjhvåtterskyll: conlang with more than 1500 words!

Post by J_from_Holland » 19 Mar 2015 18:02

update: The game 'Minecraft' is being translated into Bløjhvåtterskyll! Have fun!

Héj Minucsz deich heivilje Pljættåren, mi mæskjår Pljæmmeichen, le Nomnje hänne éj "Bløjhvåtterskyll". Mi sipiske uvelto sott soije!

Translation:

Hey people who are interested in languages, I'm making a conlang called "Bløjhvåtterskyll". I hope you like it!

I started this project 2.5 years ago, and currently there are more than 1200 words in Bløjhvåtterskyll. The grammar isn't finished yet, but there are already a lot of tenses (present/past simple/continuous, present/past perfect, gerund, most of them in passive too. There are also a subjunctive and imperative mood and another mood called Hjällytifeimmei, which means something like "mood for auxiliary verbs"). The language has 8 cases.
There are already some lists of words and sentences in this language on the Internet, but they're Dutch-Bløjhvåtterskyll, because I'm Dutch. I'll make some English lists later.

Here is a translated list:
Who are you? = Tær äske il? - I'm Glenn = Mi äske Glenn.
What's your name? = Tå äske le Nomnje iln? - My name is Sam. = Le Nomnje mynn äske Sam.
Where do you live? = Ø lyvabitäske il? - I live in London. = Mi lyvabitäske le Londonått.
Where are you from? = Wær læverje il? - I'm from Belgium. = Mi læverje la Bælgiæått.
Do you speak Bløjhvåtterskyll? = Blånje il Bløjhvåtterskyll? - Yes, a bit. = Jå, Pyttenne. or Not at all = Náj.
Do you speak a different language than Bløhvåtterskyll? = Blånje il Pljætten njærnær Bløjhvåtterskyll? - Yes, I also speak French. = Jå, mi blånje plus Franskyll.

Where's all the grammar and so on? I'll post some next episode, so you can start learning this [;)]

That's enough Bløjhvåtterskyll for now. Of course this thread will be updated!

Next time I'll explain the conjugation of 'äske', to be.

Maybe I accidentally made some mistakes in English. Just say to me what I did wrong. I'm Dutch btw
Last edited by J_from_Holland on 16 May 2015 21:15, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Bløjhvåtterskyll: conlang with more than 1200 words!

Post by Thakowsaizmu » 20 Mar 2015 00:15

J_from_Holland wrote: Maybe I accidentally made some mistakes in English. Just say to tell me what I did wrong. I'm Dutch btw
[:P]

It seems very Germanic, your conlang.

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Re: Bløjhvåtterskyll: conlang with more than 1200 words!

Post by J_from_Holland » 20 Mar 2015 16:22

Thakowsaizmu wrote:
It seems very Germanic, your conlang.
That was actually the goal: making a language that could be spoken in the western of Europe, with major influences of Scandinavian and Celtic languages and minor influences of Roman and some other European languages. Bløjhvåtterskyll has irregular verbs and more irregularness, words derived from other languages, and so on. It has its own touch of grammar though. I'll try to explain more of it later. It's gonna be pretty difficult to explain everything I'm thinking about...
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Re: Bløjhvåtterskyll: conlang with more than 1200 words!

Post by shimobaatar » 20 Mar 2015 20:43

This looks interesting. [:)] I'd like to hear about the phonology, too, once you get a chance to post more.

Welcome to the board, by the way!

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Re: Bløjhvåtterskyll: conlang with more than 1200 words!

Post by J_from_Holland » 21 Mar 2015 09:49

shimobaatar wrote:This looks interesting. [:)] I'd like to hear about the phonology, too, once you get a chance to post more.

Welcome to the board, by the way!
Where can I learn the phonetic alphabet? ^_^

I'll make some videos about the pronunciation.


Btw: here is episode 2 about äske (to be)! Yay!

Äske

Äske is a pretty difficult word. Even in the present, there are three variants of äske: the regular one (indicative mood), the 'Chouraichitifeimmei' (subjunctive mood) and the 'Hjällytifeimmei' (that other mood I was talking about). Today I'm just gonna talk about the indicative mood. I'll make an episode about the other moods later.

In the present indicative, there are two conjugations of äske: äske and äskai.
mi äske = I am (male)
ma äskai = I am (female)
il äske = you are (male singular)
du äskai = you are (female singular)
yll äske = he is
ylle äskai = she is (often you don't hear the difference between yll and ylle, but because the verbs have different endings, you'll still hear the difference between he and she)
hvy äske = we are (male&female)
ulan äske = you are (male&female plural)
yllsen äske = they are (male)
yllesan äskai = they are (female)
Yllsen and yllesan are comparable with the French ils and elles.

In the sentences I posted previous time there are already some examples of the use of äske.
Important: don't always use äske/äskai in the present! For example, when you use äske for passive constructions, you have to use the hjällytifeimmei!

The past simple of äske is pretty easy: regardless of male/female/plural/singular/whatever, it's always äska.
Mi/ma/il/du/yll/ylle/hvy/ulan/yllsen/yllesan äska.

The future of äske is also pretty simple. Two forms: äskje and äskjæ.
mi äskje = I will be (male)
ma äskjæ = I will be female)
il äskje = you will be (male singular)
du äskjæ = you will be female singular)
yll äskje = he will be
ylle äskjæ = she will be
hvy äskje = we will be (male&female)
ulan äskje = you will be (male&female plural)
yllsen äskje = they will be (male)
yllesan äskjæ = they will be (female)

That's enough grammar for now. Present, gerund and so on of äske will come later.

Some examples!
He's here. = Yll äske stort.
She's there. = Ylle äskai stort.
He was here. = Yll äska stort.
She was there. = Ylle äska stort.
He will be here. = Yll äskje stort.
She will be there. = Ylle äskjæ stort.

Yes, I'm gonna make videos about the pronunciation. Don't think I've a lot of time next week, but I'll try to make some.
Also, I corrected a grammatical error in the Bløjhvåtterskyll sentences I started the post yesterday with.

Hope you like this all!
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Re: Bløjhvåtterskyll: conlang with more than 1200 words!

Post by Creyeditor » 21 Mar 2015 14:02

J_from_Holland wrote:
shimobaatar wrote:This looks interesting. [:)] I'd like to hear about the phonology, too, once you get a chance to post more.

Welcome to the board, by the way!
Where can I learn the phonetic alphabet? ^_^

I'll make some videos about the pronunciation.
See here and here [;)]
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Re: Bløjhvåtterskyll: conlang with more than 1200 words!

Post by J_from_Holland » 21 Mar 2015 16:36

Creyeditor wrote:
J_from_Holland wrote:
shimobaatar wrote:This looks interesting. [:)] I'd like to hear about the phonology, too, once you get a chance to post more.

Welcome to the board, by the way!
Where can I learn the phonetic alphabet? ^_^

I'll make some videos about the pronunciation.
See here and here [;)]
Meh, I'll just make videos, such as this one.
How do you count in Bløjhvåtterskyll?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_CDxlISIWUM
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Re: Bløjhvåtterskyll: conlang with more than 1200 words!

Post by shimobaatar » 21 Mar 2015 18:31

J_from_Holland wrote:Meh, I'll just make videos, such as this one.
I'd still highly recommend learning the IPA. Not only does it make it easier for you to read about natlangs and other people's conlangs, it also makes it easier for people to read about your conlang(s). For many of the same reasons, I'd recommend learning how to gloss.

Along with the links Creyeditor provided, I've found the IPA Wikipedia page to be helpful as well.

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Re: Bløjhvåtterskyll: conlang with more than 1200 words!

Post by J_from_Holland » 21 Mar 2015 19:00

shimobaatar wrote:
J_from_Holland wrote:Meh, I'll just make videos, such as this one.
I'd still highly recommend learning the IPA. Not only does it make it easier for you to read about natlangs and other people's conlangs, it also makes it easier for people to read about your conlang(s). For many of the same reasons, I'd recommend learning how to gloss.

Along with the links Creyeditor provided, I've found the IPA Wikipedia page to be helpful as well.
Is this correct? First five numbers in the video written in IPA. Could someone with more IPA knowledge than me be so kind to check it and tell the mistakes to me?
enn = ɛn
dæy = dæj
tréj = tɹej
fjor=fjɒɹ
vunf=vynf


Do I need to describe every sentence I post in Bløjhvåtterskyll in IPA too? And do I need to gloss them all? Because I'm gonna post a lot of sentences, and doing that for every sentence is... a lot of work, especially when you're relatively new to it.
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Re: Bløjhvåtterskyll: conlang with more than 1200 words!

Post by shimobaatar » 21 Mar 2015 19:30

J_from_Holland wrote:Do I need to describe every sentence I post in Bløjhvåtterskyll in IPA too? And do I need to gloss them all? Because I'm gonna post a lot of sentences, and doing that for every sentence is... a lot of work, especially when you're relatively new to it.
You don't have to transcribe every sentence in IPA. You can, though, if you want to point out something about that word/sentence that you think is phonologically interesting. Also, many people start out by talking about the sounds that their conlang has, how those sounds are represented, and how those sounds interact with one another (allophony, phonotactics, morphophonology, etc.). Keep in mind that phonemes go /here/, phones/allophones go [here], and orthographic representations go <here>.

When you introduce a new grammatical topic, I think it would be a good idea to gloss a few example sentences so we can se how that new feature works and interacts with other features, but you don't have to gloss every sentence you ever post, especially since you're just starting out in terms of glossing. If you post in the Conlang Conversation Thread, or somewhere similar, you don't have to provide a gloss, just an English translation, but be aware that some people might ask for a gloss to see how your language works.

Trust me, this stuff gets easier as you do it more. And it seems like you already know a lot about linguistics.
J_from_Holland wrote:Is this correct? First five numbers in the video written in IPA. Could someone with more IPA knowledge than me be so kind to check it and tell the mistakes to me?
I'll try my best to (approximately) transcribe what I hear you saying in the video, but only you, the creator of the language, know how things are really supposed to be pronounced.

<enn> /ɛn/
<dæy> /dæj/
<tréj> /tɹej/
<fjor> /fjɔɹ/
<vunf> /vynf/

6-10, if you wanted them as well:
Spoiler:
<xys> /ʒis/
<šætt> /ʃæt/
<åkt> /ɒkt/
<nætten> /nætɛn/
<dys> /dis/
I'd recommend getting a second (and possibly third) opinion on this, though, for a number of reasons.

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Re: Bløjhvåtterskyll: conlang with more than 1200 words!

Post by J_from_Holland » 21 Mar 2015 20:32

shimobaatar wrote:
You don't have to transcribe every sentence in IPA. You can, though, if you want to point out something about that word/sentence that you think is phonologically interesting. Also, many people start out by talking about the sounds that their conlang has, how those sounds are represented, and how those sounds interact with one another (allophony, phonotactics, morphophonology, etc.). Keep in mind that phonemes go /here/, phones/allophones go [here], and orthographic representations go <here>. Could you please be so kind to explain the difference between those? I'm not that familiar with those grammatical terms in English.

When you introduce a new grammatical topic, I think it would be a good idea to gloss a few example sentences so we can se how that new feature works and interacts with other features, but you don't have to gloss every sentence you ever post, especially since you're just starting out in terms of glossing. If you post in the Conlang Conversation Thread, or somewhere similar, you don't have to provide a gloss, just an English translation, but be aware that some people might ask for a gloss to see how your language works.

Trust me, this stuff gets easier as you do it more. And it seems like you already know a lot about linguistics.
J_from_Holland wrote:Is this correct? First five numbers in the video written in IPA. Could someone with more IPA knowledge than me be so kind to check it and tell the mistakes to me?
I'll try my best to (approximately) transcribe what I hear you saying in the video, but only you, the creator of the language, know how things are really supposed to be pronounced.

<enn> /ɛn/
<dæy> /dæj/
<tréj> /tɹej/
<fjor> /fjɔɹ/ This one is a little different than I posted. I listened both on Wikipedia and I can't really here a difference. But I think you're more correct than me, because the /ɒ/ is already used by the å.
<vunf> /vynf/

6-10, if you wanted them as well:

<xys> /ʒis/ You've used an /i/. I'd to that as well, however I don't think that's the correct one. According to Wikipedia, Dutch biet and English tree use both an /i/ in their IPA transcription, but I hear a difference between them. The /i/ in tree is longer and has more a /j/-sound after it than the /i/ in biet.
<šætt> /ʃæt/
<åkt> /ɒkt/
<nætten> /nætɛn/
<dys> /dis/

I'd recommend getting a second (and possibly third) opinion on this, though, for a number of reasons.

My added text is in bold.
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Re: Bløjhvåtterskyll: conlang with more than 1200 words!

Post by shimobaatar » 21 Mar 2015 21:12

J_from_Holland wrote:Could you please be so kind to explain the difference between those? I'm not that familiar with those grammatical terms in English.
Which terms in particular are you referring to?
J_from_Holland wrote:This one is a little different than I posted. I listened both on Wikipedia and I can't really here a difference. But I think you're more correct than me, because the /ɒ/ is already used by the å.
My native dialect of English doesn't distinguish the two (as far as I know) so I've always had some trouble telling them apart myself. It's important to keep in mind that the Wikipedia pronunciations might not be the best 100% of the time, especially when it comes to vowels. Anyway, from what I've heard, the vowel in <fjor> is clearly higher than the vowel in <åkt> (it might even be as high as /o/ or /o̞/… but I'm no expert, and I think vowels can be hard to "define" with extreme accuracy for almost anyone).

If you want <o> and <å> to represent different phonemes, I'd have <å> as /ɒ/ and <o> as either /o/ or /ɔ/. I transcribed them differently because I assumed you wanted them to be distinct.

Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but aren't back vowels considered more difficult to distinguish from one another than front vowels?
J_from_Holland wrote:You've used an /i/. I'd to that as well, however I don't think that's the correct one. According to Wikipedia, Dutch biet and English tree use both an /i/ in their IPA transcription, but I hear a difference between them. The /i/ in tree is longer and has more a /j/-sound after it than the /i/ in biet.
I only know a very small bit of Dutch (hopefully I can change that soon, but I digress), so what I'm saying here is mainly based on Wikipedia and Wiktionary.

Wiktionary says <biet> is /bit/, and that <tree> is /tɹiː/ in the UK, and /tɹi/ in the US (although I've seen both transcribed as /tɹiː/ elsewhere). I'm from the US, but I'm assuming you're more familiar with Received Pronunciation (RP) than General American (GA). It wouldn't be too unusual for a long vowel like the /iː/ in /tɹiː/ to have an off-glide /j/, meaning it would be pronounced more like [tɹiːj] or [tɹij], and I'm pretty sure I've heard some people pronounce <tree> and similar words that way, both in the US and UK.

Wikipedia claims <ie> in Dutch is pronounced as /i(ː)/, meaning it can be pronounced as either /i/ or /iː/ (that's all the information it gives, sadly), but English <ee> is described as being pronounced /iː/ (most of the time).

That got longer than I wanted it to be, so I'll try to summarize. The <ie> in <biet> seems to be /i/, and the <ee> in <tree> seems to be phonemically /iː/, but phonetically something like [ij]. Bløjhvåtterskyll <y> is, as you guessed, probably either /iː/ or /ij/.

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Re: Bløjhvåtterskyll: conlang with more than 1200 words!

Post by J_from_Holland » 21 Mar 2015 21:27

shimobaatar wrote:
J_from_Holland wrote:Could you please be so kind to explain the difference between those? I'm not that familiar with those grammatical terms in English.
Which terms in particular are you referring to? Phonemes/phones/allophones.
J_from_Holland wrote:This one is a little different than I posted. I listened both on Wikipedia and I can't really here a difference. But I think you're more correct than me, because the /ɒ/ is already used by the å.
My native dialect of English doesn't distinguish the two (as far as I know) so I've always had some trouble telling them apart myself. It's important to keep in mind that the Wikipedia pronunciations might not be the best 100% of the time, especially when it comes to vowels. Anyway, from what I've heard, the vowel in <fjor> is clearly higher than the vowel in <åkt> (it might even be as high as /o/ or /o̞/… but I'm no expert, and I think vowels can be hard to "define" with extreme accuracy for almost anyone).

If you want <o> and <å> to represent different phonemes, I'd have <å> as /ɒ/ and <o> as either /o/ or /ɔ/. I transcribed them differently because I assumed you wanted them to be distinct. I'll do that :)

Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but aren't back vowels considered more difficult to distinguish from one another than front vowels?
J_from_Holland wrote:You've used an /i/. I'd to that as well, however I don't think that's the correct one. According to Wikipedia, Dutch biet and English tree use both an /i/ in their IPA transcription, but I hear a difference between them. The /i/ in tree is longer and has more a /j/-sound after it than the /i/ in biet.
I only know a very small bit of Dutch (hopefully I can change that soon, but I digress), so what I'm saying here is mainly based on Wikipedia and Wiktionary.

Wiktionary says <biet> is /bit/, and that <tree> is /tɹiː/ in the UK, and /tɹi/ in the US (although I've seen both transcribed as /tɹiː/ elsewhere). I'm from the US, but I'm assuming you're more familiar with Received Pronunciation (RP) than General American (GA). It wouldn't be too unusual for a long vowel like the /iː/ in /tɹiː/ to have an off-glide /j/, meaning it would be pronounced more like [tɹiːj] or [tɹij], and I'm pretty sure I've heard some people pronounce <tree> and similar words that way, both in the US and UK.

Wikipedia claims <ie> in Dutch is pronounced as /i(ː)/, meaning it can be pronounced as either /i/ or /iː/ (that's all the information it gives, sadly), but English <ee> is described as being pronounced /iː/ (most of the time).

That got longer than I wanted it to be, so I'll try to summarize. The <ie> in <biet> seems to be /i/, and the <ee> in <tree> seems to be phonemically /iː/, but phonetically something like [ij]. Bløjhvåtterskyll <y> is, as you guessed, probably either /iː/ or /ij/.
I'll use /iːj/ then for the <y>. By the way, is a vowel with ː pronounced longer than a vowel without ː ? Or does it mark the stress?
Again, added text is in bold.

(Heck, this forum is pretty good for my English and linguistical skills [;)] )
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Re: Bløjhvåtterskyll: conlang with more than 1200 words!

Post by shimobaatar » 21 Mar 2015 22:39

J_from_Holland wrote:I'll use /iːj/ then for the <y>. By the way, is a vowel with ː pronounced longer than a vowel without ː ? Or does it mark the stress?
Yep, /ː/ is the IPA symbol for length. It can be used with vowels or consonants. For example, /iː/ is a long /i/, and /tː/ is a long (AKA geminate or geminated) /t/. If you see something like /iːː/, that's an "overlong" version of /i/, pronounced longer than /iː/. You could technically write /iː iːː tː/ as /ii iii tt/ in some cases, but that might sometimes be ambiguous. From what I've seen, most people prefer to use /ː/ to indicate length, especially on vowels.

Stressed syllables are marked with /ˈ/ before them. In monosyllabic words, stress is typically not transcribed, because there is only one syllable that could be stressed. Sometimes, a word has both primary and secondary stress, secondary stress being the weaker of the two. /ˈ/ is placed before the syllable carrying primary stress, and /ˌ/ is placed before a syllable with secondary stress. I'd recommend reading more about stress and especially secondary stress on Wikipedia, especially since the article on secondary stress seems to give both English and Dutch examples. There might be some words in some languages with multiple secondary "stresses"; I'm not even close to being an expert on stress and similar topics.
J_from_Holland wrote:Phonemes/phones/allophones.
Hmm… I'm not sure if I can do a good job of defining these for you. I'm providing Wikipedia links as well. These aren't difficult concepts once you get them, but I'm finding them very difficult to explain in a way that I'm satisfied with.

Phonemes
Phones
Allophones

Spoken languages have phonemic inventories - inventories of phonemes. These are the sounds that speakers distinguish from one another and put together to make words. /p t k/, for example, are three of the phonemes found in English's phonemic inventory. Because they are phonemes, they are written between slashes /like this/.

Now let's take two English words: <pin> and <spin> (orthographic representations of words go <here>). Phonemically, <pin> in (generally) /pɪn/, and <spin> is /spɪn/.

Phones are the exact sounds that make up languages, but that are not necessarily thought of as distinct by speakers. Phones are written between brackets [like this]. The <p> in both <pin> and <spin> is phonemically /p/, but when we look at phones (phonetically as opposed to phonemically), it's actually two different consonants. Phonetically, <pin> and <spin> are (generally) [pʰɪn] and [spɪn]. We can now see that the phoneme /p/ in English has (at least) two separate phones: [p] and [pʰ]. English speakers do not consider the <p> in <spin> to be different from that in <pin>, but they are technically two different consonants. The distinction is not phonetic, because most English speakers consider them the same consonant, and, more importantly, because one could theoretically pronounce <spin> and <pin> as [spʰɪn] and [pɪn], and still be understood, because those are not separate, distinct words in English. There are no "minimal pairs" that distinguish [p] and [pʰ] There are some languages, however, that make a phonemic distinction between unaspirated voiceless stops /p t k/ and aspirated voiceless stops /pʰ tʰ kʰ/. Off the top of my head, Mandarin is one of those languages, but it doesn't distinguish between voiceless stops /p t k/ and voiced ones /b d g/ like English. And other languages, such as Maori, only distinguish /p t k/ when it comes to stops. Other languages sometimes make even more distinctions, but I'm sure you get the idea.

Phonetic transcription is much more specific than phonemic transcription. Languages typically have a much greater number of phones than they do phonemes.

I feel like that was probably confusing, and that's the part I have the hardest time explaining. Hopefully Wikipedia will clear some things up. Don't be afraid to ask further questions, either based on what I've written, what's on Wikipedia, on both, or on something else entirely.

Oh, I almost forgot allophones. The phones [p pʰ] are both allophones of the phoneme /p/ in English. When the phoneme /p/ occurs word-initially, like in <pin>, the allophone [pʰ] surfaces. When /p/ is not word-initial, such as when it has an <s> in front of it, like in <spin>, the allophone that surfaces is [p]. In many cases, like the one I just described, the allophone that surfaces depends on the surrounding sounds and/or the phoneme's position in the word. However, some allophones are considered to be in free variation. This means that one phoneme can be realized/pronounced in multiple ways in any given position in any given word.

Again, sorry if this is confusing, I hope Wikipedia helps clear some things up, and don't hesitate to ask questions.

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Re: Bløjhvåtterskyll: conlang with more than 1200 words!

Post by Znex » 21 Mar 2015 22:49

J_from_Holland wrote:Phonemes/phones/allophones.
Phones are sound units (ie. consonants, vowels, the like), while phonemes are basically the basic distinct sound units of any given language. What that means is any given phone in a language is an allophone, that is to say a variant or manifestation in a certain environment, of a phoneme. A phoneme hence represents a certain distribution of phones in a language.

Languages place hard lines between different phonemes and speakers of these languages can distinguish between these different distributions but more often than not be unable to distinguish between allophones of a phoneme, or phones occurring in the same distribution of phones in a language.

eg. [pʰ] is a phone, the symbols indicating a voiceless bilabial stop/plosive (p) with aspiration (ʰ). In most Germanic languages, [pʰ] is an allophone of /p/, occurring in English for example only at the beginning of a word, or of a stressed syllable (or end of a word too, depending on dialect).

In many languages however, the distinction in plosives is not between voiced and unvoiced (soft and hard), but rather between aspirated and unaspirated. Hence in Mandarin Chinese, they distinguish greatly between /pʰ/ and /p/, but find it hard to tell the difference between [p] and because these phones are both allophones of the same phoneme /p/.
J_from_Holland wrote:I'll use /iːj/ then for the <y>. By the way, is a vowel with ː pronounced longer than a vowel without ː ? Or does it mark the stress?

: indicates vowel length. ' indicates stress however.

eg. The English word <portrait> in my dialect goes ['pʰo:tʂɻəʔ] (<Vr> often represents long [V] in non-rhotic English dialects).
:eng: : [tick] | :grc: :wls: : [:|] | :chn: :isr: : [:S] | :nor: :deu: :rom: :ind: :con: : [:x]
Conlangs: Pofp'ash, Ikwawese, Old Quelgic, Nisukil Pʰakwi, Apsiska

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Bløjhvåtterskyll: conlang with more than 1200 words!

Post by J_from_Holland » 22 Mar 2015 10:52

Thank you for your ideas, tips and helpful pages!

More phonetic stuff, yay!

Who are you?
Tær äske il?
tæɹ 'ɛʃkɘ il

I'm '...' (fill in your name [;)] )
Mi äske '...'
mi 'ɛʃkɘ '...'


Where do you live?
Ø lyvabitäske il?
øː 'liːjväbiˌtɛʃkɘ il?

I live in London.
Mi lyvabitäske le Londonått.
mi 'liːjväbiˌtɛʃkɘ lɘ 'londonˌɔːt

(<sk> is here transcribed as /ʃk/. /sk/ is also correct. Bit dialect-dependent-ish.)

NOTE: Don't say 'mi äske Mary' or something like that. The correct form is 'ma äskai Mary'.
Glossed:
Ma-äskai-Mary
1P;S;F-PR;F;to_be-Mary
That means: ma is the first person singular feminine (the feminine of mi, which means I). Äskai is the present feminine of äske, to be. And Mary... is just, eh, Mary.

Ma äskai in IPA:
mɐ 'ɛʃkɑi
Bløjhvåtterskyll [CWS]
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Youtube Channel about my conlang: Bløjhvåtterskyll Conlang Course

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Re: Bløjhvåtterskyll: conlang with more than 1200 words!

Post by J_from_Holland » 22 Mar 2015 19:29

shimobaatar wrote:
J_from_Holland wrote:Meh, I'll just make videos, such as this one.
I'd still highly recommend learning the IPA. Not only does it make it easier for you to read about natlangs and other people's conlangs, it also makes it easier for people to read about your conlang(s). For many of the same reasons, I'd recommend learning how to gloss.

Along with the links Creyeditor provided, I've found the IPA Wikipedia page to be helpful as well.
Very helpful. VEEERY HELPFUL!!!


Here are the IPA thingies of the sentences I posted in the OP [:)]

Who are you?
Tær äske il?
tæɹ 'ɛʃkɘ il

I am '...' (fill in your name [;)] )
Mi äske '...'
mi 'ɛʃkɘ '...'

What's your name?
Tå äske le Nomnje iln?
tɒ 'ɛʃkɘ lɘ 'nomɲɘ iln? '...'

My name is '...'
Le Nomnje mynn äske '...'
lɘ 'nomɲɘ miːjn 'ɛʃkɘ '...'

Where do you live?
Ø lyvabitäske il?
øː 'liːjväbiˌtɛʃkɘ il?

I live in London.
Mi lyvabitäske le Londonått.
mi 'liːjväbiˌtɛʃkɘ lɘ 'londonˌɔːt

Where are you from?
Wær læverje il?
wæɹ lævɘɹjɘ il

I'm from Belgium.
Mi læverje la Bælgiæått.
mi lævɘɹjɘ lɐ 'Bæːlɡiˌ(j)æˌɒːtt

Do you speak Bløjhvåtterskyll?
Blånje il Bløjhvåtterskyll?
'blɒːɲɘ il ˌbløːj'vhɒːtɘɹˌʃkiːjl

Yes, a bit. / Not at all.
Jå, Pyttenne. / Náj.
jɒː, 'piːjˌtɛnɘ / nɑj

Do you speak a different language than Bløjhvåtterskyll?
Blånje il Pljætten njærnær Bløjhvåtterskyll?
'blɒːɲɘ il 'pljætɘn ɲæɹnæɹ ˌbløːj'vhɒːtɘɹˌʃkiːjl

Yes, I also speak French.
Jå, mi blånje plus Fránskyll.
jɒː, mi 'blɒːɲɘ plyːs 'fraɲˌʃkiːjl
Bløjhvåtterskyll [CWS]
:nld: :mrgreen: | :eng: [:D] | :deu: [:)] | :fra: [:P] | :ell: [:$]
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Bløjhvåtterskyll: Phonology and video added! Yay!

Post by J_from_Holland » 27 Mar 2015 18:58

The first YouTube Bløjhvåtterskyll lesson is finally there! (click the sentence to go to the video) Partially in English, and partially in fluent Bløjhvåtterskyll with English subtitles! You'll learn some sentences, conjugation of some verbs, and personal pronouns. Lots of new linguistic knowledge in 8 minutes :)

---

Because you guys like phonology, here is the Bløjhvatterskyll phonology. I hope I didn't forget anything, because it's pretty extensive.

BLØJHVÅTTERSKYLL PHONOLOGY

/m n ɲ/ <m n nj> (in Yslaskyll, a dialect of Bløjhvåtterskyll, it is <m n ñ>)
/p b t d k g/ <p b t d c/k g> (Is there a consonant behind the c/k? Use c. Is there a vowel behind the c/k? Use k.)
/f v vh θ s z ʃ ʒ ɣ/ <f v hv th s z š x ch>
/ɹ j ɦ l w k ks/ <r j h l w cs(z)> (Is there a consonant behind the cs(z)? Use csz. Is there a vowel behind the cs(z)? Use cs.)
Notes:
<qu> is pronounced as /kw/
<sk> is pronounced as /ʃk/, /sk/ is allowed, but /ʃk/ is preferable.
In some dialects, <ll> is pronounced as /ɬ/

/i iːj y øː ɘ o/ <i y u ø e o>
/ɐ~ä~ɑ ɒ/ <a å> (I don't hear significant difference between /ɐ/, /ä/, and /ɑ/.)
Some special sounds are these:
/ɛ ɛː e/ .
The <e> is normally pronounced as /ə/, but sometimes not.
<enn> /ɛn/ (two of the same vowels behind the e)
<ed> <eg> /e/ /e/ (d or g behind the e)
<éj> /eːj/ (only éj exist, behind the é has to be a j)
In words where the only vowel(s) is/are e's, the stressed e is pronounced as /ɪ/.
<Cset> /ksɪt/ (sentence)
Is that word 'modified' to get other vowels, the original pronunciation won't be changed.
<le Csetåre> (lə ksɪtɒɹə) (the sentences)
The <ä> is pronounced /ɛ/ in a closed syllable and as /e/ in a open syllable.
The <æ> is pronounced as/ɛː/ (or /æ/, I don't hear difference between them)

Dipthongs: <ai ei oi ou> /ɑi ɛi ɔi u/

I hope I didn't forget anything. (Wait, did I just forget I've typed that already in this post?)

(Notice in the previous post I used this thing (ɘ) for the schwa instead of this ə)

EDIT: How do you change the name of the thread?
Last edited by J_from_Holland on 27 Mar 2015 20:55, edited 1 time in total.
Bløjhvåtterskyll [CWS]
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Re: Bløjhvåtterskyll: conlang with more than 1200 words!

Post by shimobaatar » 27 Mar 2015 20:45

J_from_Holland wrote:The first YouTube Bløjhvåtterskyll lesson is finally there! (click the sentence to go to the video) Partially in English, and partially in fluent Bløjhvåtterskyll with English subtitles! You'll learn some sentences, conjugation of some verbs, and personal pronouns. Lots of new linguistic knowledge in 8 minutes :)
The link isn't working, at least not for me.
J_from_Holland wrote:/i iːj y ø ɘ o/ <i y u øː e o>
Do you mean /øː/ <ø> instead of /ø/ <øː>?
J_from_Holland wrote:/ɐ ä ɑ ɒ/ <a a a å> (I don't hear significant difference between /ɐ/, /ä/, and /ɑ/.)
The way you have it written here suggests that you have /ɐ ä ɑ/ as three separate phonemes all written the same way, <a>. Maybe you meant /ɐ~ä~ɑ/ <a>, which indicates that there's one phoneme, written <a>, that can be pronounced as any of those three vowels. When phonemes are written with ~ in between them, that means they're in free variation.
J_from_Holland wrote:EDIT: How do you change the name of the thread?
Change the subject line of the first post in the thread.

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Re: Bløjhvåtterskyll: conlang with more than 1200 words!

Post by J_from_Holland » 27 Mar 2015 20:53

shimobaatar wrote:
J_from_Holland wrote:The first YouTube Bløjhvåtterskyll lesson is finally there! (click the sentence to go to the video) Partially in English, and partially in fluent Bløjhvåtterskyll with English subtitles! You'll learn some sentences, conjugation of some verbs, and personal pronouns. Lots of new linguistic knowledge in 8 minutes :)
The link isn't working, at least not for me.
Does this one work? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qgcPWD_Kqhw
J_from_Holland wrote:/i iːj y ø ɘ o/ <i y u øː e o>
Do you mean /øː/ <ø> instead of /ø/ <øː>?
I did. Whoops... Changed it!
J_from_Holland wrote:/ɐ ä ɑ ɒ/ <a a a å> (I don't hear significant difference between /ɐ/, /ä/, and /ɑ/.)
The way you have it written here suggests that you have /ɐ ä ɑ/ as three separate phonemes all written the same way, <a>. Maybe you meant /ɐ~ä~ɑ/ <a>, which indicates that there's one phoneme, written <a>, that can be pronounced as any of those three vowels. When phonemes are written with ~ in between them, that means they're in free variation.
Thank you for learning me that notation [:D] Changed it!
J_from_Holland wrote:EDIT: How do you change the name of the thread?[/size]
Change the subject line of the first post in the thread.
Thank you! It helped me!
Last edited by J_from_Holland on 27 Mar 2015 20:56, edited 1 time in total.
Bløjhvåtterskyll [CWS]
:nld: :mrgreen: | :eng: [:D] | :deu: [:)] | :fra: [:P] | :ell: [:$]
Youtube Channel about my conlang: Bløjhvåtterskyll Conlang Course

There might be some clickable stuff in my signature.

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