Silvish

A forum for all topics related to constructed languages
User avatar
Dormouse559
moderator
moderator
Posts: 2803
Joined: 10 Nov 2012 20:52
Location: California

Re: Silvish

Post by Dormouse559 » 15 Feb 2016 21:15

I think my brief flirtation with the interpunct may have to come to an end. As much as it fascinates me, I think a variation on the arrangement I wrote two posts ago will work best:

ana /aŋa/
anna /ana/ or /õna/

I don't know of any point where <anna> will be ambiguous, and if there are any ambiguities, they're probably very rare. Generally <nn> represents nasalization near the beginning of a word, with prefixes like con- and en- (i.e. connessiun /kõ.nəˈse̯õː/). Maybe writing /õna/ as <an·na> will be a non-standard practice, perhaps used when teaching pronunciation.

On a sort of related note, the Silvish equivalent of -tion words have an interesting alternation when used to derive other words. Take passiun /paˈse̯õː/. When you form a verb from it, you get passionnâ /pa.se̯ɔˈnɛː/. The upshot is that in certain forms you get minimal pairs like passiuni /paˈse̯oː.ŋɪ/ vs. passiónni /paˈse̯oː.nɪ/ (passion-OBL and fascinate.SBJV-1SG, respectively).

I have another orthography proposal. Many recent borrowings will have an intervocalic /s/ brought into Silvish via French/Occitan/Catalan influence. Think société /sɔsjete/, négocier /negɔsje/. Thing is, the usual way of representing intervocalic /s/ is <ss>, which can get kind of cumbersome (assossiassiun brings things to "Mississippi" levels). So what do you think about spelling some of these /s/ as <ç>? Below are some French words followed by their Silvish equivalents:

French - Silvish
société - soçiëted
négocier - negoçiâ
association - assoçiassiun
français - françécs

On one level, I find this idea amusing because <ç> would form an orthographic doublet with <cz>.

Squall
greek
greek
Posts: 583
Joined: 28 Nov 2013 14:47

Re: Silvish

Post by Squall » 15 Feb 2016 22:16

Dormouse559 wrote:Theoretically, nasalization is also phonemic before nasal consonants. I haven't discovered minimal pairs yet, but there is no reason why they couldn't turn up.
I need to know about nasal vowels in natlangs in order to make conlangs with plausible occurrences of nasal vowels.

In Portuguese, a stressed vowel is always nasal before a syllable that starts with a nasal consonant. A vowel in this place is never non-nasal.
In diphthongs, such as Roraima, the nasalization of 'a' depends on the dialect. The contrast of both forms is noticeable, but there are no minimal pairs.

Does your language have nasal vowel before another vowel? Can it have the words /pã'e/ and /'pẽ.a/?
avê - When a tense is formed with "avê", the past participle agrees with the direct object of the verb, if there is a direct object and it precedes the verb. The direct object may precede in the form of a pronoun or be the antecedent of the relative clause the compound tense is in.
Interesting. I wonder if that happens in any natlangs, because I think I have listened to that form before.
English is not my native language. Sorry for any mistakes or lack of knowledge when I discuss this language.
:bra: :mrgreen: | :uk: [:D] | :esp: [:)] | :epo: [:|] | :lat: [:S] | :jpn: [:'(]

User avatar
Dormouse559
moderator
moderator
Posts: 2803
Joined: 10 Nov 2012 20:52
Location: California

Re: Silvish

Post by Dormouse559 » 15 Feb 2016 22:26

Squall wrote:Does your language have nasal vowel before another vowel? Can it have the words /pã'e/ and /'pẽ.a/?
No, it doesn't.

French is kind of funny with its nasal vowels. There are words that are phonemically transcribed with nasal vowels before nasal consonants, but no non-controversial minimal pairs. One common example is ennuyer /ɑ̃nɥije/. /ɑnɥije/ would theoretically be a different word, but that doesn't exist.

The words thème /tɛm/ and tînmes /tɛ̃m/ form a minimal pair in broad transcription, but the vowels get different realizations in different dialects.
Squall wrote:Interesting. I wonder if that happens in any natlangs, because I think I have listened to that form before.
Indeed, the same thing happens in French. [:)] The agreement rules following étre are also very French-like.

User avatar
Lao Kou
korean
korean
Posts: 5702
Joined: 25 Nov 2012 10:39
Location: 蘇州/苏州

Re: Silvish

Post by Lao Kou » 16 Feb 2016 05:23

Dormouse559 wrote:
Squall wrote:Interesting. I wonder if that happens in any natlangs, because I think I have listened to that form before.
Indeed, the same thing happens in French. [:)] The agreement rules following étre are also very French-like.
And Italian. I remember having to unlearn it in high-school Spanish.
道可道,非常道
名可名,非常名

User avatar
Dormouse559
moderator
moderator
Posts: 2803
Joined: 10 Nov 2012 20:52
Location: California

Re: Silvish

Post by Dormouse559 » 05 Mar 2016 01:32

Morphophonology update: /e/ and /o/ now participate in ablaut. They rise to /i/ and /u/ respectively and are represented as <í> and <ú>. <î> and <û> now represent /iː/ and /uː/. The main effect of this is that most words can now experience ablaut if it's involved in their declension. Before, words like drit /dɾe/ just didn't ablaut; compare drit /ˈdɾe/ -> drits /ˈdɾe/ to gzat /ˈdʑa/ -> gzáts /ˈdʑɛ/. But now drit can ablaut, its plural being dríts /ˈdɾi/.

On a syntax note, when a subordinate clause (like "when …" "if …") is placed before the main one, the subject and verb of the main clause invert. As an example:

Gzo achataré un vitúr sica gzo avessi li argenti.
1SG buy-COND INDEF car if 1SG have-IPF_SJV DEF money
I would buy a car if I had the money.

The subordinate clause (italics) follows the main clause, so in the main clause, the subject comes before the verb (both in bold). But reverse the clause order:

Sica gzo avessi li argenti, achataré-gzo un vitúr.
if 1SG have-IPF_SJV DEF money buy-COND 1SG INDEF car
If I had the money, I would buy a car.

And the verb and subject of the main clause switch.

Gah! there's so much left to do. A few things on my to-do list for this thread:
  • Fully update the big posts
  • Delve into indefinite determiners/pronouns, whether as part of section 8 or a new one
  • Create another big post. Are there any subjects you all want to see?

User avatar
Dormouse559
moderator
moderator
Posts: 2803
Joined: 10 Nov 2012 20:52
Location: California

Re: Silvish

Post by Dormouse559 » 14 Mar 2016 03:07

Sharing this so I don't forget it. It's a legend about edelweiss coming from a resident of Séez, which would be in eastern Silvia. Conworlding goals, man. [:'(]


This legend was told to me one winter's night by a very dear friend as we watched over our sheep. I will tell it to you: A long time ago, in the sky of the Tarentaise, shone a wondrous star. During their long vigils, the shepherds would try to catch a glimpse of her, for this brilliant star had the magic power to grant the wish of the first shepherd who saw her. But this star, having been up there in the firmament for so long, was bored.

At the same time, a little prince ruled over the Tarentaise. And this little prince was greatly troubled. He had many admirable treasures, rubies, gems, jewels, all the richest and most beautiful in the land, but he had dreamed of adding to his treasures this most beautiful star shining in the heavens.

Now, among the shepherds who kept their flocks on the Alpine pastures, near Mount Miravidi, there was one who, more than the others, knew how to talk the star. He was her friend and spent nights contemplating her; in fact, he was called "the Lover of the Beautiful Star."

Learning of this, the prince had the shepherd brought before him, told him of his trouble and asked him to invite the star to come into his castle. And the shepherd, all atremble, told the star the little prince's prayer. At this bold proposition from a poor human, the Celestial Court was convened. The queen scolded the star, trying to make her understand that it would be madness to listen to the prayer of an earthly beggar, even if this beggar was a prince. It changed nothing; the beautiful star, as I said, was in low spirits … and had grown bored amidst the constellations. So she decided, despite the entreaties of her queen, to grant the wish of her shepherd and, in an instant, flew to his side.

Then the queen of the stars addressed her heavenly subjects and made the following order: "An unfaithful star, forgetting that she was the most beautiful thanks to me, has lowered herself to smile upon mere mortals. This insult against our sisters demands a severe punishment: The guilty party, banished from our sky for eternity, must live on the desolate mountain peaks, face the worst winters and live in solitude, clothed in a simple white dress.

Thus it was that in the Alps, among the jagged rocks, just at the feet of the glaciers, this star was born, torn from the infinite spaces, made of white wool and delicate pistils, whom we call Edelweiss, companion of the shepherds.

User avatar
Dormouse559
moderator
moderator
Posts: 2803
Joined: 10 Nov 2012 20:52
Location: California

Re: Silvish

Post by Dormouse559 » 09 Apr 2016 00:38

For a long while, Silvish has dealt with Latin's initial /sC/ clusters by just deleting the /s/, but this always put the language at odds, at a very early stage, with other Romance languages. On the other hand, I didn't find the epenthetic vowel route all that interesting. Over the past couple days though, I've come up with a sound change that puts a nice twist on that epenthetic vowel.

So now, an epenthetic /e/ appears, like usual in Romance, but later, /s/ in coda position becomes /w/ (it used to become /j/). Filing this in with the other sound changes, Latin /sC/ becomes Modern Silvish /ɔC/. And the results are just so pretty! [:D] You get things like stellam > otela [ɔˈtɛː.la], scalam > ochala [ɔˈtɕaː.la], *specia > opissa [ɔˈpe.sa].

User avatar
qwed117
mongolian
mongolian
Posts: 4412
Joined: 20 Nov 2014 02:27

Re: Silvish

Post by qwed117 » 09 Apr 2016 02:42

Dormouse559 wrote:For a long while, Silvish has dealt with Latin's initial /sC/ clusters by just deleting the /s/, but this always put the language at odds, at a very early stage, with other Romance languages. On the other hand, I didn't find the epenthetic vowel route all that interesting. Over the past couple days though, I've come up with a sound change that puts a nice twist on that epenthetic vowel.

So now, an epenthetic /e/ appears, like usual in Romance, but later, /s/ in coda position becomes /w/ (it used to become /j/). Filing this in with the other sound changes, Latin /sC/ becomes Modern Silvish /ɔC/. And the results are just so pretty! [:D] You get things like stellam > otela [ɔˈtɛː.la], scalam > ochala [ɔˈtɕaː.la], *specia > opissa [ɔˈpe.sa].
That's actually really cool... I wish I remembered what my romlang did, other than the typical e- prefix. One question: what does opissa mean?
Spoiler:
My minicity is Zyphrazia and Novland
What is made of man will crumble away.

User avatar
Dormouse559
moderator
moderator
Posts: 2803
Joined: 10 Nov 2012 20:52
Location: California

Re: Silvish

Post by Dormouse559 » 09 Apr 2016 04:28

qwed117 wrote: That's actually really cool... I wish I remembered what my romlang did, other than the typical e- prefix. One question: what does opissa mean?
I'm glad you like it. [:)] Opissa means "spice".

shimobaatar
korean
korean
Posts: 11673
Joined: 12 Jul 2013 22:09
Location: PA → IN

Re: Silvish

Post by shimobaatar » 23 May 2016 04:42

So much amazing stuff has been added here since I last commented. I'll try to make as many comments as I can while catching myself up with the thread.
Dormouse559 wrote:Adjectives suffixed with the reflex of Latin -alis are now so sweetly irregular. [:D] Not too much but just enough.
Spoiler:

Code: Select all

"finau" final
M
   NOM       OBL
SG finau     fineli
PL fináus    finélis

F
   NOM       OBL
SG finela    finél
PL finelas   finélis
I'm working on full updates for the noun, adjective and verb declensions, so I'll hopefully have those up in due time.
Dormouse559 wrote:I just finished updating the numbered sections on the first page of this thread. They're all linked in the first post. A lot of the updates are pretty minor, but here are a few changes of note:
Spoiler:
- /tɕ/ is now represented by <ch>. While there is a general pattern to whether <ch> means /k/ or /tɕ/, exceptions aren't hard to find. Non-standard orthographies might play around with <chz> to specify /tɕ/ where there is ambiguity.
- /ʎ/ is a phoneme (again) and is regularly represented by <gl> (again). I settled on sound changes that could get me some interesting irregularity while maintaining some familiar word shapes, and that partly involved bringing back /ʎ/.
- The RE verbs are more Catalan/Occitan, with several of them dropping the /d/ in their infinitives and adding a velar infix. For example, préndre has the forms prenons and préngona.
- I added sections on irregular nouns and adjectives, and added the conjugation of poê "to be able to".
I think my next project will be to finalize the subjunctive.
Cool! I'll have to find time to go back and read through the updated posts earlier in the thread.
Dormouse559 wrote:Finally, my post about the subjunctive. There ended up being so much information, I gave it its own section after 7.1. I tried as hard as I could to make my explanations clear, but I'm sure there's still confusing bits in there; please let me know if you find one. Questions and comments are always welcome. [:)]
Dormouse559 wrote: Determiners are among the most common words in Silvish. Except in certain cases, usually fixed phrases, a noun will always be accompanied by a determiner of some kind, sometimes more than one.
Very interesting, detailed posts. I wish I had more to say, but they both contain a great deal of information that's presented in a non-confusing way, at least from my point of view.
Dormouse559 wrote: 8.3.2 Natural Pairs
Natural pairs (e.g. hands, eyes, shoes) behave differently than other nouns after possessives. In the plural, a naturally paired noun cannot take the definite article, and in the singular, it has to. So you can only say "las mievas máns" (my hands), with the article, and "mieva man" (my hand), without the article.
It's late where I am when I'm writing this, so I'm probably wrong here, but doesn't the final sentence here contradict the penultimate one?
Dormouse559 wrote:I thought I'd make another vocab post, this time about household nouns. The words are arranged by room and in each entry, you'll see the Silvish word followed by IPA, its gender (and number, in one case), and the English translation.
I love the sound of Silvish, the look of its orthography, and how its orthography matches up with its pronunciation.
Dormouse559 wrote:priváds mpl. - toilet (room or fixture)
Sorry if I'm missing it somewhere, but how is this pronounced?
Dormouse559 wrote:Sharing this so I don't forget it. It's a legend about edelweiss coming from a resident of Séez, which would be in eastern Silvia. Conworlding goals, man. [:'(]

Spoiler:
This legend was told to me one winter's night by a very dear friend as we watched over our sheep. I will tell it to you: A long time ago, in the sky of the Tarentaise, shone a wondrous star. During their long vigils, the shepherds would try to catch a glimpse of her, for this brilliant star had the magic power to grant the wish of the first shepherd who saw her. But this star, having been up there in the firmament for so long, was bored.

At the same time, a little prince ruled over the Tarentaise. And this little prince was greatly troubled. He had many admirable treasures, rubies, gems, jewels, all the richest and most beautiful in the land, but he had dreamed of adding to his treasures this most beautiful star shining in the heavens.

Now, among the shepherds who kept their flocks on the Alpine pastures, near Mount Miravidi, there was one who, more than the others, knew how to talk the star. He was her friend and spent nights contemplating her; in fact, he was called "the Lover of the Beautiful Star."

Learning of this, the prince had the shepherd brought before him, told him of his trouble and asked him to invite the star to come into his castle. And the shepherd, all atremble, told the star the little prince's prayer. At this bold proposition from a poor human, the Celestial Court was convened. The queen scolded the star, trying to make her understand that it would be madness to listen to the prayer of an earthly beggar, even if this beggar was a prince. It changed nothing; the beautiful star, as I said, was in low spirits … and had grown bored amidst the constellations. So she decided, despite the entreaties of her queen, to grant the wish of her shepherd and, in an instant, flew to his side.

Then the queen of the stars addressed her heavenly subjects and made the following order: "An unfaithful star, forgetting that she was the most beautiful thanks to me, has lowered herself to smile upon mere mortals. This insult against our sisters demands a severe punishment: The guilty party, banished from our sky for eternity, must live on the desolate mountain peaks, face the worst winters and live in solitude, clothed in a simple white dress.

Thus it was that in the Alps, among the jagged rocks, just at the feet of the glaciers, this star was born, torn from the infinite spaces, made of white wool and delicate pistils, whom we call Edelweiss, companion of the shepherds.
Wow! Sorry if I've missed something about this, but are you planning to translate this into Silvish? If not, please don't feel pressured to, and if so, please don't feel pressured to do so quickly. I'd imagine this would be quite an undertaking!

User avatar
Dormouse559
moderator
moderator
Posts: 2803
Joined: 10 Nov 2012 20:52
Location: California

Re: Silvish

Post by Dormouse559 » 23 May 2016 05:33

shimobaatar wrote:Cool! I'll have to find time to go back and read through the updated posts earlier in the thread.
I'll have to go back through them, too. Things are getting out of date again. [xD]
shimobaatar wrote:Very interesting, detailed posts. I wish I had more to say, but they both contain a great deal of information that's presented in a non-confusing way, at least from my point of view.
That's great! I need other people's eyes to save me from my silly mistakes.
shimobaatar wrote:It's late where I am when I'm writing this, so I'm probably wrong here, but doesn't the final sentence here contradict the penultimate one?
Speaking of which, you're right. The penultimate sentence is correct, so the actual phrases would be "mievas máns" (my hands), with no article, and "la mieva man" (my hand), with the article.
shimobaatar wrote:I love the sound of Silvish, the look of its orthography, and how its orthography matches up with its pronunciation.
Aww, thank you. [<3]
shimobaatar wrote:
Dormouse559 wrote:priváds mpl. - toilet (room or fixture)
Sorry if I'm missing it somewhere, but how is this pronounced?
Good catch. That's pronounced [pɾɪˈvɛː].
shimobaatar wrote:Wow! Sorry if I've missed something about this, but are you planning to translate this into Silvish? If not, please don't feel pressured to, and if so, please don't feel pressured to do so quickly. I'd imagine this would be quite an undertaking!
Eventually, I want to translate it. I think it'd be fun to have a little collection of folk tales from the area, some pre-existing like this one and others I made up. And maybe there could be a Silvish counterpart to the Brothers Grimm or Jean de La Fontaine who compiles them.

shimobaatar
korean
korean
Posts: 11673
Joined: 12 Jul 2013 22:09
Location: PA → IN

Re: Silvish

Post by shimobaatar » 23 May 2016 15:38

Dormouse559 wrote:I'll have to go back through them, too. Things are getting out of date again. [xD]
Heh, then I'll have to remember to come back periodically to look for possible updates. [:D]
Dormouse559 wrote: Eventually, I want to translate it. I think it'd be fun to have a little collection of folk tales from the area, some pre-existing like this one and others I made up. And maybe there could be a Silvish counterpart to the Brothers Grimm or Jean de La Fontaine who compiles them.
Oh, that would be cool!

IEPH
cuneiform
cuneiform
Posts: 109
Joined: 22 May 2016 23:40

Re: Silvish

Post by IEPH » 24 May 2016 01:43

Hello there. I just love your conlang so far.

Is there any chance you can come up with the Silvish lyrics to Let it Go?

User avatar
Dormouse559
moderator
moderator
Posts: 2803
Joined: 10 Nov 2012 20:52
Location: California

Re: Silvish

Post by Dormouse559 » 26 May 2016 22:35

IEPH wrote:Is there any chance you can come up with the Silvish lyrics to Let it Go?
Not just now, but once I've got the language in a more stable position, sure.

User avatar
Dormouse559
moderator
moderator
Posts: 2803
Joined: 10 Nov 2012 20:52
Location: California

Re: Silvish

Post by Dormouse559 » 11 Jun 2016 18:28

One possibility for the domicile of the Silvish royal family is the Château de Briançon (in French). But in our timeline it was razed to the ground in 1690, and I'm not finding any photos of the ruins online, so it's difficult to be sure I have the exact location. The castle'll need much better care if it's to work. The area specified by the Wikipedia page is quite dramatic. It looks like the castle would have perched atop these jagged cliffs with a town nestled in the valley below.


EDIT: Including some relevant links with the information I've found so far (in French):

La Léchère (strategic importance of the château)
Aigueblanche (château passes from the Briançon family)
PDF: Sites, Monuments et Personnages célèbres (ditto "Aigueblanche", description of château, p21)

User avatar
Dormouse559
moderator
moderator
Posts: 2803
Joined: 10 Nov 2012 20:52
Location: California

Re: Silvish

Post by Dormouse559 » 01 Jul 2016 02:19

A few weeks ago, I updated the big posts. The biggest change is probably that the interpunct is back. I find it really difficult to neatly describe its usage, but basically, it distinguishes [nasal vowel] + /n/ from [oral vowel] + /n/ and goes between certain prefixes and roots to indicate their pronunciation. I tried my best to explain it in section 2.3.

Below is a new addition to the pronouns section. And stay tuned, because in a few minutes, I will also put up a new post on indefinite determiners. As usual, I would love to hear any questions or comments you have. [:)]

5.3 Indefinite Pronouns
All pronouns previously described (except on) are definite. But Silvish also has a set of indefinite pronouns (IP's) which refer to non-specific things. The positive ones are mainly: cauc'un "someone", cauca-rin "something", choc'un "everyone" and tot "everything" (Negative ones will be covered later). All of these, except cauca-rin, decline for case. Cauc'un and choc'un can additionally decline for number and gender, but this is uncommon, reserved for formal writing.

IP's have a slight resemblance to nouns because, unlike definite pronouns, they can be modified with adjectives, though not in the same way as full nouns. To modify an IP with an adjective, the connective particle ca is added after the IP and then the adjective is added after that. The adjective will always be in the nominative singular masculine. For example:

Gzo ò vesud uni uön·ni preocupánti.
I have seen INDEF-OBL man-OBL interesting-OBL
I saw an interesting man.

Gzo ò vesud cauc'uni ca preocupánt.
I have seen someone-OBL PTCL interesting.NOM
I saw someone interesting.

In the first sentence, preocupánt follows the noun uön·ni directly, and it agrees with the noun by taking the oblique case. In the second sentence, preocupánt is connected to cauc'uni by the connective particle ca. Additionally, even though, cauc'uni is the oblique form of cauc'un, preocupánt is in its nominative form.


Click here to return to the rest of section 5.

User avatar
Dormouse559
moderator
moderator
Posts: 2803
Joined: 10 Nov 2012 20:52
Location: California

Re: Silvish

Post by Dormouse559 » 01 Jul 2016 02:29

8.4 Indefinite Determiners
This is a large group of words, compared to the other sets of determiners. It is also distinguished by its diversity, both in terms of semantics and syntax. What indefinite determiners (ID's) have in common is their description of non-specific nouns. They cover concepts like "some" (cauca), "all" (tot), "more" (plupa de) and "no" (grê de). An ID immediately precedes the noun phrase it modifies, though occasionally another determiner can come between it and the noun phrase.

This section will not cover all words falling under the umbrella of "indefinite determiner". Negative ID's like grê de will be included in a separate section about negation.

8.4.1 Adjectival ID's
Many ID's behave like adjectives. The only surface difference is that they can and normally appear without other determiners. Like adjectives, many agree with the noun they modify in gender, number and case, declining like regular adjectives. Cert "certain, some" is one example. Others, like cauca "some", are invariable.

8.4.2 Compound ID's
These ID's are composed of one or more words followed by de. They are harder to categorize than their adjectival counterparts. Traditionally called "compound ID's", their behavior has been compared to that of nouns and indefinite pronouns by various linguists. Still other analyses have simply called them "adverbs" in the "These don't fit anywhere else" sense. On the level of declension, compound ID's are invariable, and the modified noun declines normally. Compare the following sentences:

Gzo ò unis gzátis.
I have INDEF-OBL-PL cat-OBL-PL
I have some cats.

Gzo ò bién de gzátis.
I have a_lot of cat-OBL-PL
I have a lot of cats.

The first sentence uses an indefinite article, which agrees with the noun in gender, number and case (un -> unis). The second sentence uses a compound ID, which does not mark any category. The noun gzat, however, declines normally, into the oblique plural.

8.4.3 Use With Other Determiners
Some ID's can be accompanied by other determiners, usually definite articles and demonstratives. In that case, the implication is that the modified noun is specific (rather than non-specific, with an unaccompanied ID).

Most commonly, the extra determiner goes before the ID. For example, quautas cauca flúrs (DET-F.NOM-PL few flower.NOM.PL -- these few flowers). As shown in that example, the extra determiner agrees with the noun when attached to an adjectival ID like cauca. When attached to a compound ID, the determiner defaults to masculine singular, only changing for case. Take the following sentence:

Gzo ò li plupa de gzátis.
I have DEF-OBL.M most of cat-OBL-PL
I have the most cats.

Plupa is preceded by the definite article li. Li is in the singular even though gzátis is in the plural.

One instance where the extra determiner goes after the ID is tot (all, any). Since tot is adjectival, the added determiner agrees fully with the modified noun. For example, totas quelas flúrs (all-F.NOM-PL DET-F.NOM-PL flower.NOM.PL -- all these flowers).

8.4.4 Use With Adjectives
Compound ID's can be modified with adjectives, though not directly. Like with indefinite pronouns, the adjective is connected to the ID with the particle ca. In this position, the adjective is invariable. For example:

Gzo ò bién ca sorprenént de gzátis.
I have many PTCL surprising of cat-OBL-PL
I have surprisingly many cats.

This construction is quite limited in the number of adjectives that can be used but appears regularly in most registers.


Click here to return to the rest of section 8.

shimobaatar
korean
korean
Posts: 11673
Joined: 12 Jul 2013 22:09
Location: PA → IN

Re: Silvish

Post by shimobaatar » 03 Jul 2016 21:24

Dormouse559 wrote:A few weeks ago, I updated the big posts.
I'll have to go back and check those out.
Dormouse559 wrote: As usual, I would love to hear any questions or comments you have. [:)]
I'm afraid I don't have much to say other than that Silvish continues to be impressively detailed and well thought-out beyond words!

User avatar
Dormouse559
moderator
moderator
Posts: 2803
Joined: 10 Nov 2012 20:52
Location: California

Re: Silvish

Post by Dormouse559 » 05 Jul 2016 17:31

shimobaatar wrote:I'll have to go back and check those out.
Cool. Let me know if anything stands out to you. I also updated the verb conjugations. The third-person plural has changed again <nna> -> <e>.
shimobaatar wrote:I'm afraid I don't have much to say other than that Silvish continues to be impressively detailed and well thought-out beyond words!
Thank you. :mrgreen:

shimobaatar
korean
korean
Posts: 11673
Joined: 12 Jul 2013 22:09
Location: PA → IN

Re: Silvish

Post by shimobaatar » 06 Jul 2016 00:50

Dormouse559 wrote:
shimobaatar wrote:I'll have to go back and check those out.
Cool. Let me know if anything stands out to you.
I will! Hopefully I'll have the time to read thoroughly enough to find anything, though.

Post Reply