Romanizations

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HoskhMatriarch
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Romanizations

Post by HoskhMatriarch » 12 Jan 2016 21:43

OK, I've been having trouble romanizing Hoskh properly, and some of my other sketches with more than average consonants like Lokar which is also from my conworld and has words come up in stories. Once I posted some words from Hoskh and someone thought it was Germanic, which is fine by me, but since I significantly simplified the phonology (down from like 33 consonants to 27, which is only slightly more than the 24 of English) I'm not sure what the best romanization would be. On the one hand it can't look completely European and familiar because it has weird sounds (although I apparently did a good job of making it look like German even with epiglottals). On the other hand I feel like no language, no matter how weird, has to look like qha'e'phstlyo''loa'thq in romanization (even if it's a total kitchen sink language, you could probably romanize it not to look like one). I wish I could just use my conscript instead of having to use romanization, but I need romanization for conworkshop and for writing stories. I especially need the romanization I use in stories (which may be further anglicized from what I end up using in my conlang dictionary) to not look ridiculous because the Hoskh people (who are normal humans, mostly) live in the mountains and forests and have cottages and castles, they're not aliens with spaceships (the name of the language and people looks mostly like a Caucasian thing to me, which I don't really associate with high tech spaceships, but I might have to change the Anglicization if it looks too weird to other people).

So I guess I just need some lessons in practical romanization, and how to balance aesthetic with practicality. Siasô has a mostly practical orthography since no one but me has to look at it (it's not used in stories) and I use <uu> for /w/ since <w> is a labialization marker and /sw/ (and other clusters) contrasts with /sʷ/ (and other labialized sounds). <uu> for /w/ probably isn't a very practical choice most of the time though, no matter how much fun it is to make things look like Old High German. On the other hand, it's generally difficult to decide to how show fortis and lenis pairs that are not contrasted by voicing, as well as bunches of sounds that would all be said and heard by the typical English speaker as /h/ and /k/. I tend to use further Anglicizations after romanizations in stories though, like just writing [q͡χʕoɑnt͡seəɫ] (a proper name of a dialect and region in that dialect) as Kronesail or Cronesail (I'm not very consistent) so that people can vaguely pronounce it (the voiced pharyngeal approximant in this dialect also takes the place of the uvular trills and approximants in the standard dialect, which are rhotics, in case you're wondering), so maybe that actual romanization I use in dictionaries should be entirely practical since probably no one will have to look at it anyways. However, I still want it to look good.
No darkness can harm you if you are guided by your own inner light

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Creyeditor
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Re: Romanizations

Post by Creyeditor » 03 Apr 2016 19:16

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Khunjund
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Re: Romanizations

Post by Khunjund » 07 Apr 2016 19:39

You could also post your phonology here or in the Romanization Game thread (less recommended) to see what other people come up with, and adopt the elements you happen to like.
Fluent: :ca-qc: :eng: | Learning: :deu: :jpn: | Interested: :ara: :kor: :rus: :lat: :grc: :pol: :fr-br: :irl: etc.

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