Kāzaron (Cazaron)

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Sglod
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Kāzaron (Cazaron)

Post by Sglod » 18 Mar 2016 13:20

I have been working on Kāzaron for only about two weeks now but it's my most complete conlang yet! I'll try to put as much about it here as I can and will add more as I develop it...

Here are some key features:

Ergative/Absolutive
9 Noun cases
SOV word order

Phonology

/æeiouɑøɯ/ <aêioûâeu>

/mnŋ/ <mnŋ>
/pbtdkg/ <pbtdkg>
/d͜z t͜ʂ d͜ʐ/ <z c q>
/ɸβθʂχɬ/ <fvțshł>
/ɾ~ɻ~ʐ l/ <rl>

Allophony

<r> is pronounced /ɾ/ at the start of a syllable and either /ɻ/ or /ʐ/, depending on the speaker, at the end of one.

Some of the vowels have unstressed pronunciations:

/ɑ/ > [ɐ]
/i/ > [ɪ]
/u/ > [ʊ]
/ɯ/ > [ɨ]
/ø/ > [œ̈]

As an example, the language's name is pronounced /ˈkɑd͜zæɾon/.

Stress is put on the first syllable of root of the word.

For example:

lipācit'
li-pāc-it'
3s-sleep-PST
/liˈpɑt͜ʂiθ/

I'll post more later...
Last edited by Sglod on 05 Aug 2016 10:30, edited 5 times in total.

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Re: Kāzaron (Cazaron)

Post by Sglod » 19 Mar 2016 11:31

Nouns

In Kāzaron, there are 9 noun cases:

Absolutive, Ergative, Dative, Inessive, Allative, Ablative, Genitive, Instrumental, Comitative, and Causal

Noun declension

mar - woman

ABS: mar
ERG: marê
DAT: marûm
LOC: maruz
ALL: marim
ABL: marik
GEN: marâ
INS: marât
COM: maren
CAU: mares

Plurals

Plurals are formed by putting an <i> or <u> after the first vowel in the head. <i> is used with back vowels and <u> with front vowels.

mar /mæɻ/ woman > maur /mæuɻ/ women
cūron /tʂuɾon/ shark > cūiron /ˈtʂui̯ɾon/ sharks

The case endings are unchanged in the plural:

marim /ˈmæɾim/ to the woman > maurim /ˈmæu̯ɾim/ to the women
Last edited by Sglod on 05 Aug 2016 10:21, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Kāzaron (Cazaron)

Post by shimobaatar » 15 May 2016 03:13

Sglod wrote:I have been working on Kāzaron for only about two weeks now but it's my most complete conlang yet! I'll try to put as much about it here as I can and will add more as I develop it...
I think it looks nice so far! Hopefully we can see even more of it in the future.

Sglod wrote: /ɸβθʂχɬ/ <fvt' sl'>
How is the uvular fricative romanized? Hopefully I'm not missing anything.
Sglod wrote: Stress is put on the first syllable of head of the word.
What do you mean by "of head"?
Sglod wrote:Absolutive, Ergative, Inessive, Allative, Ablative, Genitive, Instrumental, Comitative, and Causal
What can you tell us about how the cases are used and what connotations they carry?

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Re: Kāzaron (Cazaron)

Post by Sglod » 18 May 2016 20:29

How is the uvular fricative romanized? Hopefully I'm not missing anything.
As H. Thanks for pointing that out - I missed it... [:$]
What do you mean by "of head"?
I meant the stress it put on the head of the word, and the first syllable of that. For example: in marim (to the woman), the stress would be put on the mar- as that means woman.

I'm not sure if head is the proper way to describe that...
What can you tell us about how the cases are used and what connotations they carry?
I can explain it, but not now as I am bogged down with exams... [>_<]
I think it looks nice so far! Hopefully we can see even more of it in the future.
Thanks very much! It is almost certain you will! [:D]

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Re: Kāzaron (Cazaron)

Post by shimobaatar » 18 May 2016 21:20

Sglod wrote: I meant the stress it put on the head of the word, and the first syllable of that. For example: in marim (to the woman), the stress would be put on the mar- as that means woman.

I'm not sure if head is the proper way to describe that...
Ah, I think either "root" or "stem" might be the word you're looking for.
Sglod wrote: I can explain it, but not now as I am bogged down with exams... [>_<]
No worries, take your time!

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Re: Kāzaron (Cazaron)

Post by Isfendil » 19 May 2016 06:37

I am also now following this. Luckily this conlang is much easier for me to pronounce then some of the other ones thatve front paged lately.

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Re: Kāzaron (Cazaron)

Post by OTʜᴇB » 20 May 2016 21:23

What category does this fall into? aux-lang? nat-lang etc.?
:con: : Current Project

BTW I use Arch

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Re: Kāzaron (Cazaron)

Post by Creyeditor » 20 May 2016 21:41

It looks like a naturalistic artlang (not the same as a nat-lang).
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Re: Kāzaron (Cazaron)

Post by Sglod » 15 Jun 2016 11:38

I've finished my exams so here you go:

ABSOLUTIVE

The absolutive is used for the subjects of intransitive verbs and the direct objects of transitive ones. The nouns dictionary form will be its absolutive. For example:

Mar lisâdiț
mar-Ø li-sâd-iț
woman-ABS 3s.AN-drink-PRF
The/A woman drunk

You will also see that the 3rd person pronouns signify animacy, not physical gender.

ERGATIVE

The ergative is used for the subjects of transitive verbs. To form it, add to the dictionary form.

Marê ioleț lisâdiț
mar-ê ioleț-Ø li-sâd-iț
woman-ERG cider-ABS 3s.AN-drink-PRF
The/A woman drunk cider

LOCATIVE

The locative tells where something is, signifying 'at' and 'in'. To form it, add uz.

Hin bursiruz lia
hin bur-sir-uz li-Ø-a
pig-ABS table-surface-LOC 3s.AN-be-PRS
The pig's on the table

Aûlin kalûâ koțuz litâsa
aûlin kalû-â koț-uz li-tâs-a
girl.PL dog-POS side-LOC 3s.AN-stand-PRS
The girls are standing beside the dog
Last edited by Sglod on 26 Jul 2016 13:58, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Kāzaron (Cazaron)

Post by Omzinesý » 15 Jun 2016 17:17

Should -kot- and -sir- be analysed as parts of the case ending as well?
How productively are they used for forming expressions of location?

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Re: Kāzaron (Cazaron)

Post by Sglod » 15 Jun 2016 19:53

Omzinesý wrote:Should -kot- and -sir- be analysed as parts of the case ending as well?
How productively are they used for forming expressions of location?
Kot and sir are not part of the case ending, and are words in their own right. 'Surface' was a bad way of translating 'sir'; it means the up-facing side of an object. Other words can be used in place of them, depending on context. For example:

Alin kalûâ łedimuz lia
alin kalû-â łedim-uz li-Ø-a
girl dog-POS back-LOC 3s.AN-PRS
The girl is on the dog (she's riding it)

You also don't have to be as precise. You could just say:

Hin buruz lia
The pig is at the table
(Although without the meaning of being sat as if waiting for dinner; the pig's location is somewhere near the table)

I hope that answers your questions! (It probably doesn't)
Last edited by Sglod on 26 Jul 2016 13:57, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Kāzaron (Cazaron)

Post by shimobaatar » 16 Jun 2016 01:53

Sglod wrote:I've finished my exams so here you go:
Thanks! Congratulations on getting through your exams, by the way. [:D]

I hope this doesn't sound rude of me to ask, but do you plan on explaining the other cases as you've explained the first three here? I'd be interested in seeing that, but you don't have to if you don't want to or don't have the time.
Sglod wrote: You will also see that the 3rd person pronouns signify animacy, not physical gender.
So the language's gender/noun class system is based on animacy, then? This might seem like a question with an obvious answer, but I'm curious about how exactly the animacy of a noun is determined; I ask because it isn't perfectly clear-cut in many natural languages, so to speak. Also, can this system be seen manifesting itself outside of third person pronouns as well?

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Re: Kāzaron (Cazaron)

Post by Sglod » 16 Jun 2016 09:33

Congratulations on getting through your exams, by the way. [:D]
Thanks! [:D]
I hope this doesn't sound rude of me to ask, but do you plan on explaining the other cases as you've explained the first three here? I'd be interested in seeing that, but you don't have to if you don't want to or don't have the time.
I'll explain the others when I have the time. They'll probably come soon... (He says...)
Sglod wrote: You will also see that the 3rd person pronouns signify animacy, not physical gender.
So the language's gender/noun class system is based on animacy, then? This might seem like a question with an obvious answer, but I'm curious about how exactly the animacy of a noun is determined; I ask because it isn't perfectly clear-cut in many natural languages, so to speak. Also, can this system be seen manifesting itself outside of third person pronouns as well?
The split is only noticable in the 3rd and 2nd pronouns and the verb conjugations of those two persons (the inanimate 2nd person is for crazy people who like to talk to their furniture). The genitive case is also only used for animate nouns; inanimate nouns are just stuck together, like bursir a table's surface. For example:

(Li) likâla
li li-kâl-iț
3s.AN 3s.AN-eat-PRS

(I) ikâla
i i-kâl-a
3s.INAN 3s.INAN-eat-PRS

If the noun is an animal or plant, it'll be animate. If not, it's inanimate. Some nouns' animacy can change depending on the speaker. These are normally man-made devices, such as automatons, or other living organisms, such as fungi and bacteria.

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Re: Kāzaron (Cazaron)

Post by shimobaatar » 16 Jun 2016 14:58

Sglod wrote: I'll explain the others when I have the time. They'll probably come soon... (He says...)
No worries, take all the time you need!
Sglod wrote: The split is only noticable in the 3rd and 2nd pronouns and the verb conjugations of those two persons (the inanimate 2nd person is for crazy people who like to talk to their furniture). The genitive case is also only used for animate nouns; inanimate nouns are just stuck together, like bursir a table's surface. For example:
Spoiler:
(Li) likâla
li li-kâl-iț
3s.AN 3s.AN-eat-PRS

(I) ikâla
i i-kâl-a
3s.INAN 3s.INAN-eat-PRS
If the noun is an animal or plant, it'll be animate. If not, it's inanimate. Some nouns' animacy can change depending on the speaker. These are normally man-made devices, such as automatons, or other living organisms, such as fungi and bacteria.
Wow, interesting! Thank you for your explanation. [:D]

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Re: Kāzaron (Cazaron)

Post by clawgrip » 16 Jun 2016 15:24

I particularly like the plural infix, especially that it completely changes form (i vs. u) so there isn't an actual base form.

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Re: Kāzaron (Cazaron)

Post by Sglod » 26 Jul 2016 13:57

Here's some more! I haven't been posting on this lately because [insert terrible excuse here]. I've also been making a descendent of Kâzaron, Harzôn, but I should probably finish posting its parent's grammar first...

More noun cases! :

LATIVE (-im)
The lative can mean 'to' when referring to location and 'until' when referring to time. When combined with compound words, it can mean 'onto', 'into', etc. For example:

Kalû bursirim ditogi!
kalû bur-sir-im di-tog-i
dog.ABS table-surface-LAT 2s-put-IMP
Put the dog on the table!

Kalû aulinâ koțim ditogi!
kalû aulin-â koț-im di-tog-i
dog girl.PL-POS side-LAT 2s-put-IMP
Put the dog next to the girls!

ABLATIVE (-ik)
The ablative works the same way as the lative, but means 'from'.

Kalû bursirik disani!
kalû bur-sir-ik di-san-i
dog table-surface-ABL 2s-take-IMP
Take the dog off the table!

POSSESSIVE (-â)
The possessive is used solely with animate nouns. That is, it is attached to the possessor which must be an animate noun.

(Ê) lobâsâ sâd ia?
(ê) lo-bâs-â sâd ia?
(3s.INAN.ERG) AN.INT.DET-person-POS drink.ABS 3s.INAN.be.PRS?
Whose drink is it/this/that?

INSTRUMENTAL (-ât)
The instrumental indicates how an action is done and can be attached to the method or the instrument used (I haven't worked out how it'll work with verbs yet though...)

(Ê) odemât divaiț?
(ê) o-dem-ât di-va-iț?
(3s.INAN.ERG) INAN.INT.DET-method-INS 2s-do-PST
How did you do it/this/that?

The last two cases'll come sometime in the distant near future.
Last edited by Sglod on 04 Aug 2016 14:24, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Kāzaron (Cazaron)

Post by shimobaatar » 27 Jul 2016 22:15

Sglod wrote:Here's some more! I haven't been posting on this lately because [insert terrible excuse here]. I've also been making a descendent of Kâzaron, Harzôn, but I should probably finish posting its parent's grammar first...
It's always nice to see more from you, but don't worry if you can only post infrequently. I look forward to seeing Harzôn as well, whenever you're ready to present it. It probably would be a good idea to finish the parent first, though.
Sglod wrote: More verb cases! :
I may be misunderstanding something, but do you mean "noun cases"? Sorry if I'm missing something here.
Sglod wrote: The ablative works the same way as the lative, but means 'from'.
Does it mean the same thing when used to talk about time?
Sglod wrote:(I haven't worked out how it'll work with verbs yet though...)
What do you mean here?
Sglod wrote: The last two cases'll come sometime in the distant near future.
Take your time!

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Re: Kāzaron (Cazaron)

Post by k1234567890y » 27 Jul 2016 23:21

your language looks nice! (:

how does Kāzaron form negation, relative clause and other subordinate clauses?
私のアツい人工言語活動!言カツ!始まります!!

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Re: Kāzaron (Cazaron)

Post by Sglod » 03 Aug 2016 19:25

shimobaatar wrote:
Sglod wrote:Here's some more! I haven't been posting on this lately because [insert terrible excuse here]. I've also been making a descendent of Kâzaron, Harzôn, but I should probably finish posting its parent's grammar first...
It's always nice to see more from you, but don't worry if you can only post infrequently. I look forward to seeing Harzôn as well, whenever you're ready to present it. It probably would be a good idea to finish the parent first, though.
Aye, and thank you for taking the time to read and comment on it [:D]
Sglod wrote: More verb cases! :
I may be misunderstanding something, but do you mean "noun cases"? Sorry if I'm missing something here.
Yeah... I meant noun cases... Yet another brain fart... [>_<] Thanks for pointing it out [:D]
Sglod wrote: The ablative works the same way as the lative, but means 'from'.
Does it mean the same thing when used to talk about time?
If you mean does it mean 'from' then yes
Sglod wrote:(I haven't worked out how it'll work with verbs yet though...)
What do you mean here?
I gonna have some sort of way to attach the instrumental to a verb to achieve a meaning like as in bold (the verb can change):

He broke the mug by hitting it

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Re: Kāzaron (Cazaron)

Post by Sglod » 03 Aug 2016 19:50

k1234567890y wrote:your language looks nice! (:

how does Kāzaron form negation, relative clause and other subordinate clauses?
Thanks [:D]
I'll explain the last two noun cases, and then I'll tell you! [:D]

COMITATIVE (-en)
The comitative means 'along with'

Ni kalûen stelim iodiț
1s.ABS dog-COM park-LAT INTRANS-go-PST
I went to the park with the dog

CAUSITIVE (-es)
The causitive case (there is also a causitive voice as in Japanese) indicates why an action is performed or an event takes place. It can be attached to a noun or a verb.

To ni kalûes ipâciriț
NEG 1s.ABS dog-CAUS INTRANS-sleep-POT-PST
Because of the dog, I could'nt sleep
Last edited by Sglod on 04 Aug 2016 14:24, edited 5 times in total.

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