Semitic-inspired conlang

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Anwelda
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Semitic-inspired conlang

Post by Anwelda » 18 Sep 2016 17:57

Hi,

I have been creating a Semitic-based conlang for a while now, so I thought I would display it on the CBB to have some feedback. I can talk about its phonology and a few other things, but it is not going to be that complete. At least for now. Also I am not really used to employ computers and stuff, so I am sorry in advance if everything is not really clear.

Phonology

The phonology is not very hard. There are about twenty-three consonants and seven mono-vowels (romanisation is between brackets "()"):


Consonants

Plosive: /p/ (p); /b/ (b); /t/ (t); /d/ (d); /k/ (c); /g/ (g); /q/ (k); /ɢ/ (v¹); /ʔ/ ('²);
Nasal: /m/ (m); /n/ (n);
Trill: /r/ (r);
Fricative: /f/ (f); /v/ (w); /θ/ (th); /ð/ (dh); /s/ (s); /z/ (z); /ç/ (ch); /χ/ (rh); /h/ (h);
Approximant: /j/ (y);
Lateral approximant: /l/ (l).

Some consonants are lengthened (which is important since it can change the meaning of the word) and aspirated:

Lengthened: /t:/ (tt); /d:/ (dd); /n:/ (nn); /r:/ (rr); /s:/ (ss); /z:/ (zz³); /l:/ (ll); /p:/ (pp); /b:/ (bb*); /m:/ (mm);
Aspirated: /kʰ/ (kh); /gʰ/ (gh).

About the vowels, there are also five long ones and eleven diphthongs:

Mono-vowels

Close: /i/ (i); /u/ (u);
Close-mid: /e/ (e); /o/ (o);
Open-mid: /ɛ/ (ë); /ɔ/ (ö);
Open: /a/ (a).

Long vowels

Close: /i:/ (í); /u:/ (ú);
Close-mid: /e:**/ (é);
Open-mid: /ɔ:/ (ó);
Open: /a:/ (á).

Diphthongs

/e/ diphthong onset: /ei/ (ei); /ea/ (ea); /eu/ (eu);
/u/ diphthong onset: /ui/ (ui); /ua/ (ua); /ue/ (ue);
/a/ diphthong onset: /ai/ (ai); /ae/ (ae) (ae); /au/ (au); /ao/ (ao); /aɔ/ (aö).

I have not worked on stress yet.

Grammatically speaking, there are thirteen cases (nominative, accusative, genitive, dative, ablative, locative, vocative, instrumental, abessive, adverbial, comparative, equative, and essive), two grammatical genders (masculine and feminine), and three grammatical numbers (singular, plural, and dual). And there are four consonantal root groups (each group related to the number of consonants, i-e: group one is for all the mono-consonantal root words like "T", to fight). I also thought that maybe adjective predicates would stick with the noun, but I am not really sure...

Since the language is very young, I was not able to deal with a lot of things (like the verbal system), but it should come soon enough. I will post later when it will be ready.




¹ I know this is weird, but as seen later /v/ is represented by the letter "w", so I had to make a choice.
² I am not really sure about this one. Perhaps it will change.
³ May change as well.
* May change.
** This one is relatively new.
Last edited by Anwelda on 18 Sep 2016 20:42, edited 1 time in total.

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Isfendil
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Re: Semitic conlang

Post by Isfendil » 18 Sep 2016 18:21

I thought this was a conlang in the semitic family, but the grammar that you've teased says otherwise. You mean to say that this language uses the triliteral root system? I look forward to seeing how you've employed it.

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Anwelda
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Re: Semitic conlang

Post by Anwelda » 18 Sep 2016 18:46

Isfendil wrote:I thought this was a conlang in the semitic family, but the grammar that you've teased says otherwise. You mean to say that this language uses the triliteral root system? I look forward to seeing how you've employed it.

Yeah, you're right. It is kind of Semitic. Actually, what we could consider as really semitic in this language is the fact that the roots of the words are only consonantal. But indeed, there are roots of one, two, three and four consonants, therefore making up the four groups I talked about.

I also have to say that depending on the group, a given word and its arguments let us say, will behave in a particular way. I will give an example.

Possessive pronouns have two distinct forms. For mono and bi-consonantal roots, the pronoun is infixed (in a particular place within the word so that phonotactics is not distorted). But when it comes to triliteral and quadriteral (is it how you say it? I don't even know...) roots, the pronouns have an external form. I have not created them yet, but this is basically what it should be like:

"Vichan" for "my works".

Analysis:

"V" = to work.
"ich" = possessive pronoun.
"an" = nominative declension for mono-consonantal roots (plural, masculine).

More or less.

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Re: Semitic conlang

Post by Isfendil » 18 Sep 2016 19:25

I asked once on the forums whether other families did the same thing that the Afro-Asiatic family did with its roots and they said that there were some native languages which employed a similar system. So to confirm, this language is inspired by the family's multiradical roots, but is not itself a member?

Monoliteral roots sound hard, but cool. So the number of consonants in the root get higher as the word becomes more complex? Also, are your roots going to have their vowels entirely determined by affixes, or will their be internal patterns like semitic? The possessive pronoun is an infix, that is why I ask.

And it is indeed quadriliteral.

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Re: Semitic conlang

Post by Anwelda » 18 Sep 2016 20:40

Isfendil wrote:So to confirm, this language is inspired by the family's multiradical roots, but is not itself a member?
I would rather say that I just drew my insipration from semitic languages (to a certain extent), but that is it. I would say it is also very personal.
Isfendil wrote:Monoliteral roots sound hard, but cool. So the number of consonants in the root get higher as the word becomes more complex?
Not really. I am afraid I did not really find any reason whatsoever to the number of consonants in a root but my own tastes.
Isfendil wrote:Also, are your roots going to have their vowels entirely determined by affixes, or will their be internal patterns like semitic? The possessive pronoun is an infix, that is why I ask.
The vowels take their location in a root according to some phonotactic rules I set beforehand. For instance, here is how root words work according to the groups one, two and three (with "C" for consonant (the root, obviously), and "D" for declension):

Group 1 (root "T", to fight for the masculine, or to throw for the feminine):

Singular masculine: CD (Ta, a fight)
Singular feminine: DC (öT, a throw)
Plural masculine: CD (Tan, fights)
Plural feminine: DC (thöT, throws)
Dual masculine: CD (Tas, the two fights)
Dual feminine: DC (röT, the two throws)

Group 2 (root "N-S", to break for the masculine, or to shatter for the feminine):

Singular masculine: CDCD (NaiSi, a crack)
Singular feminine: DCDC (iNaS, a destruction (in a figurative way))
Plural masculine: CDCD (NaiSirh, cracks)
Plural feminine: DCDC (hiNaS, destructions)
Dual masculine: CDCD (NaiSim, the two cracks)
Dual feminine: DCDC (dhiNaS, the two destructions).

Group 3 (root "L-W-RH", to leverage for the masculine, or to open for the feminine):

Singular masculine: CDCDC (LúWeiRH, a profit)
Singular feminine: CDCC (LeWRH, a door)
Plural masculine: DCDCDC (saLúWeiRH, profits)
Plural feminine: DCDCC (inLeWRH, doors)
Dual masculine: DCDCDC (khëLúWeiRH, two profits)
Dual feminine: DCDCC (ayLeWRH, the two doors).

(As we can see, each root has at least two meanings, and maybe three, since I did not take care of the adjectives yet).

So as I said before, "vichan" (pronounced /'ɢiçan/) would be "my works", with "ich" being the possessive pronouns. But to say (this is just an example; the external form is not set yet) "my door", it would be something like "lewrh iss" (again, this is just an example).
Isfendil wrote:And it is indeed quadriliteral.
Thank you.

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Re: Semitic-inspired conlang

Post by Isfendil » 19 Sep 2016 13:51

Alrigt, I look forward to seeing this progress! Does it have a name yet?

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Anwelda
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Re: Semitic-inspired conlang

Post by Anwelda » 19 Sep 2016 18:29

Isfendil wrote:Does it have a name yet?
No. When it comes to constructed languages, the name of the new conlang is generally the last thing that I think about. Thank you for your responses.

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