Funny Speech Quirks and More!

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Inkcube-Revolver
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Funny Speech Quirks and More!

Post by Inkcube-Revolver » 14 Apr 2017 02:40

I've thought about sharing this in the past, so why not a better time than now:

I have two siblings with autism, they're both pretty high in the spectrum; my sister is more talktative than my brother, who can speak, mind you, but he's regressed a bit after not having an intimate speech therapy session for some time and has always been lazy about talking. He mostly talks or yells if he's excited, really joyful, or angry or scared. My sister, on the other hand, talks her head off and still keeps on rolling; she has imaginary friends and everything. My sister, K.C., displays some interesting speech quirks. When she's doing homework or a puzzle or finishes a meal or what-have-you, she simply says "I'm finished," but pronounces the phrase as: /ˌaɪm ˈdɪnɪtʃ/

At first, it seemed like it was only that one instance where she pronounces an [f] as a [d], but there are other words she tends to parse the consonant with. It's really interesting, as with the most common words that start with [f] (four, five, fire, etc.), she pronounces normally, but for some less commoner ones ("finish" from current memory, as she uses it a lot), this mutation of sorts happens. What's also interesting is that when she pronounces the word/name "Copper" (the hound à la The Fox and the Hound), she registers the name as /ˈkɑɸɚ/ and even /ˈkɑfɚ/. This is a basis with her alone, as nobody else in my family has weird sound changes like these (apart from my grandmother with her broke-ass English).

Another interesting tick, which would happen to me very often, was that this guy who was once a really good friend of mine would switch the beginning consonants of two words, especially if they were compounds and proper names, like some sort of strange metathesis.

E.g.: "Burger King" would become "*Kurger Bing"
Taco Bell > *Baco Tell
combat boots > *bombat coots
Mallrats > *Rallmats
that's "candy dandy" > that's "dandy candy"
"this is so stupid" > "this is *sto *supid"
can you do me a favor > can you *fo me a *davor
and many more I cannot remember at the moment and would be far too embarrassed to recall.

This got really bad, especially for me, I kept on doing this unintentionally and fumbled up my words. He also mispronounced a lot of words, too, and that had a negative effect on my speech, which wasn't amazing at the beginning but was still passable and I didn't stutter as bad. Oh, also, at some point in my life I developed a sort of stutter, and being around him didn't help much either (he's one of those fucks that shoots "umm" and "like" out of his flapper at maximum velocity). He also gave off the image of being stupid a lot, though he wasn't quite so, but, yeah.

Anywho, If anybody has any weird quirks they want to share, that'd be cool to know! It'd definitely be better if it's some sort of first or secondhand deal.
I like my languages how I like my women: grammatically complex with various moods and tenses, a thin line between nouns and verbs, and dozens upon dozens of possible conjugations for every single verb.

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Re: Funny Speech Quirks and More!

Post by qwed117 » 14 Apr 2017 04:25

I realized earlier this week that I occasionally pronounce good as [gɯ̽ːd̚]. /ɯ̽/ is my usual phone for the /ʊ/ phoneme, but what I found strange was the lengthening of the vowel. I hadn't noticed this before. I haven't tested it in different words, but I do think it occurs with other lax phonemes (ɪ ɛ æ*). I haven't found the exact locations in which it is; or if it's merely an allophonic feature.
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Re: Funny Speech Quirks and More!

Post by All4Ɇn » 14 Apr 2017 04:37

Inkcube-Revolver wrote:Another interesting tick, which would happen to me very often, was that this guy who was once a really good friend of mine would switch the beginning consonants of two words, especially if they were compounds and proper names, like some sort of strange metathesis.
I do this a lot myself! One that happens a lot is "low the mawn" instead of "mow the lawn". A lot of the time I'll have 2 synonymous words in my mind when I'm thinking and when I talk both of them come out as one word so I might say something like "galright" instead of good or alright. Sometimes when I'm talking I might say a word that's closely related to what I want to say but not exactly what I intended. This actually happened today when I said "let's go to that food" when I intended to say "restaurant". In texting/typing I also have a huge tendency to leave off negative markers which obviously causes a bit of confusion... I have a lot of weird quirks in my speaking than I could probably go into. I'm not sure why but things like this happen to me in French, Italian, and German too but interestingly they happen a lot less and least of all when I speak French. My guess is the flow of French is more similar to the way think but I'm not sure.

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Re: Funny Speech Quirks and More!

Post by Inkcube-Revolver » 14 Apr 2017 04:50

@qwed
Hm, interesting. I've never heard anyone pronounce it like that, for it would be registered as "Guh" /ˈgəːʔ/ to most listeners not expecting it to come out that way, no? I live in Miami, so a lot of people here with thick accents pronounce it either /'guːd/ or /'guːʔ/ or even /goːd/. Now I wonder if interactions with other cultures and L2 learners force dialects of languages to purify their vowels.
English is one of my first languages, I was actually brought up bilingual with Spanish, too, but when my family and I moved up to Orlando for a few years while I was still in elementary school, I lost the Spanish in me. I'm slowly, but surely, regaining the skill close to 21.
I find myself pronouncing pull like "poll" a lot, which is funky and rubs me the wrong way pretty often.
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@All4Ɇn
Hooray! Not alone on this!
You've described exactly how that happens! It's such a strange tick, and now I wonder if anybody's ever used someone with a really nasty case of this process for carrying secret messages, like they have to piece together the rhymes of the words that are screwed up in order to get the message across. Would probably be a VERY unnecessarily complex system to use, but would be more comedic, I suppose.
I like my languages how I like my women: grammatically complex with various moods and tenses, a thin line between nouns and verbs, and dozens upon dozens of possible conjugations for every single verb.

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Re: Funny Speech Quirks and More!

Post by All4Ɇn » 14 Apr 2017 04:53

Inkcube-Revolver wrote:Fuckin' Miamians and our accents!
I'm from North Florida so to me everyone down there sounds like shit even if your English is probably even more correct [:P]
Inkcube-Revolver wrote:now I wonder if anybody's ever used someone with a really nasty case of this process for carrying secret messages, like they have to piece together the rhymes of the words that are screwed up in order to get the message across. Would probably be a VERY unnecessarily complex system to use, but would be more comedic, I suppose.
Sounds a bit like Cockney slang to me. Just slightly less complicated than it

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Re: Funny Speech Quirks and More!

Post by Inkcube-Revolver » 14 Apr 2017 05:03

All4Ɇn wrote: I'm from North Florida so to me everyone down there sounds like shit even if your English is probably even more correct [:P]
Now, I would fight you on that, but you're probably right, we can't even speak Spanish right! Stupid debuccalization, plaguing the minds of the youth and making them sound like they're speaking while their mouths are full! (even when they are full!!!)

...!!!
All4Ɇn wrote: Sounds a bit like Cockney slang to me. Just slightly less complicated than it
Now I've gotta look into this madness. Slang is great, 'specially foreign slang.
I have family that lives up in Jacksonville, don't hear from them too much aside from Fb likes. If you never want to come down here, then thank goodness you don't have to traverse all 8 hours of Florida just to go down to the beaches (which are nice when people aren't awful).
I like my languages how I like my women: grammatically complex with various moods and tenses, a thin line between nouns and verbs, and dozens upon dozens of possible conjugations for every single verb.

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Re: Funny Speech Quirks and More!

Post by All4Ɇn » 14 Apr 2017 05:24

Inkcube-Revolver wrote:I have family that lives up in Jacksonville, don't hear from them too much aside from Fb likes. If you never want to come down here, then thank goodness you don't have to traverse all 8 hours of Florida just to go down to the beaches (which are nice when people aren't awful).
Don't live in Florida anymore so I still have to travel about 8 hours to get down to its beaches now [:(] . But hey Jacksonville's beaches are pretty nice and I've got family living near them so that's a plus

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Re: Funny Speech Quirks and More!

Post by Inkcube-Revolver » 14 Apr 2017 05:36

Well, beaches seem pretty great regardless of where they are.
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Re: Funny Speech Quirks and More!

Post by GrandPiano » 14 Apr 2017 05:36

qwed117 wrote:I realized earlier this week that I occasionally pronounce good as [gɯ̽ːd̚]. /ɯ̽/ is my usual phone for the /ʊ/ phoneme, but what I found strange was the lengthening of the vowel. I hadn't noticed this before. I haven't tested it in different words, but I do think it occurs with other lax phonemes (ɪ ɛ æ*). I haven't found the exact locations in which it is; or if it's merely an allophonic feature.
I think it's a well-established fact that vowels in English tend to be lengthened before voiced consonants. Could that be what you're noticing?
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Re: Funny Speech Quirks and More!

Post by Inkcube-Revolver » 14 Apr 2017 05:44

Hm, never noticed that was a thing in English until now, had to think about that for a second. Is it the voicing that stretches the length, or is it to distinguish it further from otherwise homophone counterparts (eg. "back" vs. "bag" and "sat" vs. "sad") or would it be a bit of both? I'm not very privy to this being a development in the language.
I like my languages how I like my women: grammatically complex with various moods and tenses, a thin line between nouns and verbs, and dozens upon dozens of possible conjugations for every single verb.

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Re: Funny Speech Quirks and More!

Post by All4Ɇn » 14 Apr 2017 05:49

I've never noticed it either. I definitely pronounce sat as [sæɾ] and sad as [sæːɾ]. Interesting
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Re: Funny Speech Quirks and More!

Post by qwed117 » 14 Apr 2017 05:51

GrandPiano wrote:
qwed117 wrote:I realized earlier this week that I occasionally pronounce good as [gɯ̽ːd̚]. /ɯ̽/ is my usual phone for the /ʊ/ phoneme, but what I found strange was the lengthening of the vowel. I hadn't noticed this before. I haven't tested it in different words, but I do think it occurs with other lax phonemes (ɪ ɛ æ*). I haven't found the exact locations in which it is; or if it's merely an allophonic feature.
I think it's a well-established fact that vowels in English tend to be lengthened before voiced consonants. Could that be what you're noticing?
Could be. I'm not sure the exact environments of the lengthening feature. I think it's pretty interesting, even so. It's just not something that I noticed before. I can't think off the bat of any other environments where I do this. I think I do it in /bæd/ but not /bæt/. Maybe this is the feature you mentioned, but it feels more like [bæᵊd]
Inkcube-Revolver wrote:Hm, never noticed that was a thing in English until now, had to think about that for a second. Is it the voicing that stretches the length, or is it to distinguish it further from otherwise homophone counterparts (eg. "back" vs. "bag" and "sat" vs. "sad") or would it be a bit of both? I'm not very privy to this being a development in the language.
I think I remember reading it at one point. I don't think it's homophonic distinguishing. It doesn't happen when the word is medial and followed by a vowel, where homophony is the most present (ladder-latter merge)
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Re: Funny Speech Quirks and More!

Post by Creyeditor » 14 Apr 2017 10:15

Someone I know has a retroflex tongue shape (kind of [ɻ]-like) when pronuncing /f/, so that following lateral approximants become somehow flapped.
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Re: Funny Speech Quirks and More!

Post by Axiem » 15 Apr 2017 02:58

Inkcube-Revolver wrote: Another interesting tick, which would happen to me very often, was that this guy who was once a really good friend of mine would switch the beginning consonants of two words, especially if they were compounds and proper names, like some sort of strange metathesis.
This is known as Spoonerism, and I enjoy doing it a lot, too.
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Re: Funny Speech Quirks and More!

Post by jimydog000 » 15 Apr 2017 10:53

I used to pronounce three as sree until my friends pointed it out when I was 10.

I also use [v] in place of [ð] in words like "mother" but it's dental in "another".
Lastly I think I use [p͡f] in "something" and accidentally in words such as "from".
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Re: Funny Speech Quirks and More!

Post by Parlox » 15 Apr 2017 19:48

I just realised i pronounce get as gɪ.
I also pronounce something with p͡f.
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Re: Funny Speech Quirks and More!

Post by abi » 15 Apr 2017 20:06

I don't really round any of my vowels. Like, they sound "rounded" yet my lips hardly move. I have a really hard time trying to speak german.

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Re: Funny Speech Quirks and More!

Post by Egerius » 15 Apr 2017 20:32

I know a girl in my neighbourhood (actually, she's a young woman now, but anyway) who replaces every [k] with [t].
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Re: Funny Speech Quirks and More!

Post by qwed117 » 15 Apr 2017 20:33

Egerius wrote:I know a girl in my neighbourhood (actually, she's a young woman now, but anyway) who replaces every [k] with [t].
Maybe she's Hawai'ian ...
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Re: Funny Speech Quirks and More!

Post by Egerius » 15 Apr 2017 20:39

Pretty much unlikely in Germany. I know that she's got some cognitive disability (she told me that she went to a special-needs-school [Sonderschule]), but that's sure not going to impact articulatory precision (there's a world between the velum and the dental ridge), or does it?
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