Eathut - 7 phonemes

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Re: Eathut - 8 phoneme MINIMALISM.

Post by DV82LECM » 09 Sep 2019 14:50

Revised phonology: (Believe me, it works...)

/p~f~v~m~b/ <p>
/t~(t)s~l~n~d~ɾ/ <t>
/k~ʃ~ʒ~ŋ~g/ <c>
/h~ʔ~w~j~ɴ/ <h>
/i~e~j/ <e>
/u~o~w/ <u>
/a~ɑ/ <a>

NEXT: Grammar.
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Re: Eathut - 7 phoneme MINIMALISM.

Post by DV82LECM » 16 Sep 2019 16:22

Phonotactics, Part 1.

I know I said grammar, but this will cover phonotactics. Earlier, my multiple posts on this confused MANY and I think I found a new way to present it.

Firstly, similar consonant avoidance plays a major part in this language. (I wanted to have as much distinguishable allophony as I could. You know, hear a sound and instinctively know to which phoneme it belongs.)

There are homorganic (/pup tit kak/) and heterorganic (/put tik kap/) syllables. The phonetic quality of the onsets remain the same, but the quality of the coda can alter greatly WITHIN word and syllable boundaries.

Coda of a heterorganic syllable become fricatives:

/put tik kap/ [pot͡s teʃ kɑf].

Coda of a homorganic syllable become nasals:

/pup tit kak/ [pom ten kɑŋ].

Secondly, consonant realizations can alter with stress. Unstressed syllables become voiced fricatives and stressed syllables remain voiceless:

/'ipa/ ['iva] "meet", /i'pa/ [i'pa] "1pS"
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eldin raigmore
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Re: Eathut - 8 phonemes

Post by eldin raigmore » 17 Sep 2019 01:35

Interesting!

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Re: Eathut - 8 phonemes

Post by DV82LECM » 17 Sep 2019 16:13

Phonotactics, Part 2.

I think that the two rules above, especially the first, gave some here a HUGE headache in previous explanations. I hope I cleared them up. Today, I am going to tackle consonant cluster boundaries. THIS is where it gets a tiny bit weird. (Sandhi is fun.)

Heterorganic syllables are the favorite; ALWAYS straight talkers and never tell lies. Homorganic syllables are the problem child; ALWAYS changing their story (and probably throw bricks at houses).

As you can see below, the first consonant in the cluster changes its quality to a voiceless fricative; stress does not change the quality of the second:

/'pukta/ ['poʃta], /puk'ta/ [poʃ'ta]

Now, when syllables are homorganic, the first consonant in the cluster is nasalized. Ah, if ONLY that were it, though. Sandhi gets involved like a nosey, opinionated friend:

/'tutʔi/ ['tonʔi] -> ['tonti] -> ['tondi] "arm"
/tut'ʔi/ [ton'ʔi] -> [ton'ti]

I must admit I've skipped ahead a chapter. The above example insists that /h/ ([ʔ] in THIS environment) attaches to the nasal, assimilating the glottal, and turning it into a normal alveolar plosive. (IF it were a prior heterorganic syllable, it would have activated gemination, becoming [t:], like /'putʔa/ ['pot:a].) However, STILL, the assimilated glottal becomes voiced, due to being in unstressed position. This effect happens with all examples in this environment.

EVERY example of this works the same way, but the more pure realization of the nasals, [m n ŋ], is maintained ONLY in word coda position.
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Re: Eathut - 8 phonemes

Post by DV82LECM » 17 Sep 2019 16:23

eldin raigmore wrote:
17 Sep 2019 01:35
Interesting!
Thank you, good person.

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Re: Eathut - 8 phonemes

Post by DV82LECM » 18 Sep 2019 15:53

Phonotactics, Part 3.

For the support for this, thank you. If people go back into the archive of this post, they can find what Yatton is inspired by, but, in truth, I have taken a good lot of it from Papuan influence.

Anyway, today will be MUCH easier than yesterday. Actually, what comes NEXT is the easiest concept in the language: word coda. Simply, heterorganic and homorganic syllables come into play, here. (Nasal realizations are similar in a few, because I ran out of distinguishable nasals. But the environments dictate well enough where things should be with little confusion.)

If the last syllable of a word is heterorganic, the word coda are:

/-p -ɾ -k/

If the last syllable of a word is homorganic, the word coda are:

/-m -n -ŋ/

Now, I could not mention word coda WITHOUT vowels. They are as integral as the consonants. There is NOTHING like umlaut, so vowels are not arbitrary; they are very much involved in making lexical distinctions.

/i u a/ (That's all folks!)

There are no long vowels, no tone. There is something like pitch accent, and with the number of consonants, minimal pairs are highly common. However, within closed syllables, the high vowels do drop.

/i u/ -> /e o/; /a/, ALSO, gains backness.

As well, ONLY at onset, /i u/ become semivowels in unstressed position. (They CAN become semivowels in another place, but more on that, later. I will have to make a whole post about intervocalic semivowels.)
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Re: Eathut - 8 phonemes

Post by DV82LECM » 18 Sep 2019 17:34

Phonotactics, Part 4.

I am doing this post earlier than I thought. THIS post is about the intervocal clusters within the language. Clusters have always been a favorite of mine to try to derive. Unlike most of you, I am sure, phonology has ALWAYS been my favorite aspect of languages, in general.

/-p/: [ft fk p:]
/-t/: [t͡sp t͡sk t:]
/-k/: [ʃp ʃt k:]

The reason for there not being any pairs of similar consonants is really due to the fact that I could not think of what I wanted them to be. So, I insisted on the merger of consonants when they meet their exact duplicate. As much, this happens with vowels, thus no long vowels.

/ɬ/ was the trickiest. It did not exist in the original design. But I wanted there to be one more consonant. It was supposed to be /kl/, but that proved hard. Looking back on it now, I am quite amazed that I was able to find/milk any MORE variety out of this.

In the end, the clusters above are for heterorganic syllables. When it comes to homorganic syllables, each coda consonant will nasalize, assimilating the consonant that is next, where becoming voiced when the following syllable is unstressed. If the syllable IS stressed, that consonant will remain voiceless. These details were given example in the posts ABOVE.

EDIT: /ɬ/ IS GONE!!!
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Re: Eathut - 8 phonemes

Post by DV82LECM » 18 Sep 2019 18:51

Let's take a break from phonotactics and talk about pronouns:

1pS <eppá> /i'pa/
2pS <put> /poɾ/
3pM <ca> /ka/
3pF <áhe> /'aji/
3pN <tu> /tu/

Plurality is derived with prefix <ha>.

1pP <haeppá> /hai'pa/
2pP <hapút> /ha'voɾ/
3pPM <hacá> /ha'ʒa/
3pPF <háhe> /'haji/
3pPN <hatú> /ha'lu/

I will talk about /'aji/ in the NEXT lesson. It is a difficult thing to grasp, at first, as it pertains to semivowels.
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Re: Eathut - 7 phonemes

Post by DV82LECM » 22 Sep 2019 14:18

Permitted intervocalic clusters (SOME sandhi is involved and certain environments are different than expected).

[p: t: k: ft fk t͡sp t͡sk ʃp ʃt]
[mp nt ŋk mt mk np nk ŋp ŋt]

[p:ʷ t:ʷ k:ʷ psʷ fkʷ lpʷ lkʷ ʃpʷ ksʷ]
[mpʷ ntʷ ŋkʷ msʷ mkʷ npʷ nkʷ ŋpʷ ŋsʷ]

[p:ʲ t:ʃ k:ʲ ptʃ fkʲ lpʲ lkʲ ʃpʲ ktʃ]
[mpʲ ntʃ ŋkʲ mtʃ mkʲ npʲ nkʲ ŋpʲ ŋtʃ]

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Re: Eathut - 7 phonemes

Post by DV82LECM » 28 Sep 2019 00:47

Just a quickie:

There are ONLY two cardinal directions:

TÉPUT ['tivoɾ] "East (place where the Sun rises)"
ÁTUT ['alon] "West (place where the Sun sets)"
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Re: Eathut - 7 phonemes

Post by ɶʙ ɞʛ » 28 Sep 2019 02:22

Why is <e> used for /i~e/ but <u> for /u~o/?

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Re: Eathut - 7 phonemes

Post by DV82LECM » 28 Sep 2019 05:21

ɶʙ ɞʛ wrote:
28 Sep 2019 02:22
Why is <e> used for /i~e/ but <u> for /u~o/?
Because my last name is MansEAU. I'm slightly self-absorbed. But, in all seriousness, I've ALWAYS been fascinated with my last name. Its constant mispronunciation was an early springboard into linguistics. My orthography is an homage.

I ALSO have grapheme-color synesthesia. E is purple. A is blue. And U is yellow. To me, my language is colorful. And it's not that I see those letters IN those colors, but rather, I heavily associate them TOGETHER.

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Re: Eathut - 7 phonemes

Post by DV82LECM » 30 Sep 2019 15:33

So...

Some of the rules have changed, again. *holds grudge with self* But NOTHING that rewrites everything ABOVE. I've simplified some of the rules and made them slightly more plausible. Biggest of all, the actualization of like consonants. And the stressed, intervocalic syllables have consistent voiced realizations.

ÉPA /'iva/, EPÁ /i'va/
ÉPHA /'ifa/, EPHÁ /i'fa/
ÉPPA /'ima/, EPPÁ /i'ma/
ÉHPA /'ipa/, EHPÁ /i'pa/

The first WAS where there were /p t k h/ in stressed position, but I universalized the voiced variants. The second WAS the gemination, then the H was going to drop and leave it voiceless, but I decided to retain the fricative principle of the H and made each their fricated variants. The third WAS to be the new gemination, then I made them the environment where the plosive realizations showed up intervocalically, but I settled on it being where I allowed a sole nasal variant. The fourth, and final, was the hardest; but I settled on it being where the lone plosive may exist, intervocalically.

With semivowels, the /v/ becomes /b/; the /f/ becomes /p/; the /m/, in the third, becomes /mb/; and the /p/ in the fourth, becomes /p:/. More on the semivowels in the NEXT post. Still is quite hard to understand.

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Re: Eathut - 7 phonemes

Post by DV82LECM » 10 Nov 2019 15:25

https://conworkshop.com/view_language.php?l=CVC

I simplified the shit out of this. I was just making it too complicated...so I went back to the original recipe. However, I kept a few elements that I liked and scrapped ones that could no longer work. Most of the information on the upper half of the second page is STILL accurate. I believe this is now elegant and capable of becoming, probably, my favorite project, ever.

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