British Romance Language Collablang

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GoshDiggityDangit
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Re: British Romance Language Collablang

Post by GoshDiggityDangit » 15 Sep 2019 06:30

230: b
231: d
232: b
233: c

gokupwned5
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Re: British Romance Language Collablang

Post by gokupwned5 » 15 Sep 2019 22:08

this_is_an_account wrote:
15 Sep 2019 05:56
230: C
231: A
232: A
233: A

The answers for questions 228 & 229 not matching up seems really weird to me. I'd rather we did a revote of them.
Alright, we'll do a revote.

EDIT: The questions have been edited appropriately.
Last edited by gokupwned5 on 15 Sep 2019 22:13, edited 1 time in total.

gokupwned5
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Re: British Romance Language Collablang

Post by gokupwned5 » 15 Sep 2019 22:12

228. A
229. C
230. C
231. C
232. D ([ɛjɹ ɔjɹ ajɹ ɛwɹ ɔwɹ awɹ] > [eːɚ ojɚ aːɚ ewɚ oːɚ aːɚ])
233. A

gokupwned5
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Re: British Romance Language Collablang

Post by gokupwned5 » 22 Sep 2019 04:03

The results are in!

--

228) How should /ɲ/ be realized in General Columbian Brettaniot?
a) /ɲ/ > [ɲ]

229) How should /ʎ/ be realized in General Columbian Brettaniot?
a) /ʎ/ > [ʎ]

--

230) How should the sequences [iɹ uɹ ɨɹ ɛɹ ɔɹ ɐɹ] be realized?
c) [iɹ uɹ ɨɹ ɛɹ ɔɹ ɐɹ] > [ɛɚ ɔɚ ɨɚ ɛɚ ɔɚ ɚ]

231) How should the sequences [iːɹ uːɹ eːɹ oːɹ aːɹ] be realized?
a) [iːɹ uːɹ eːɹ oːɹ aːɹ] > [iːɚ uːɚ eːɚ oːɚ aːɚ]

232) How should the sequences [ɛjɹ ɔjɹ ajɹ ɛwɹ ɔwɹ awɹ] be realized?
a) [ɛjɹ ɔjɹ ajɹ ɛwɹ ɔwɹ awɹ] > [ejɚ ojɚ ajɚ ewɚ owɚ awɚ]

233) It is 1867 CE, and since the conception of the USC, slavery has been a major issue. Although the slave trade was banned in 1808 CE, slavery has yet to be outlawed, which has made the African Columbian dominated South (Florida, Cuba, Haiti, the Bahamas, and Shaymaca) unhappy. This year, tensions exploded under Democratic president George MacLowlin /mæklowlin/, and a slave rebellion has started. What happens next?
a) Any slaves remaining are emancipated.

--

234) It is 1870 CE. Northern Mexican rebels want to secede from the Mexican Empire and have a democratic government. What should the USC do?
a) We should intervene and side with the rebels.
b) We should intervene and side with the Mexican Empire.
c) We should stay out of it.
d) Other.

235) We have finished voting on the standard Columbian dialect of Brettaniot. What should the dialectical divide in the current USC be? For reference, the current USC has the territories of the OTL US right after the Louisiana Purchase in addition to Cuba, Haiti, the Bahamas, and Jamaica.
a) North-South divide
b) Northwest-Southeast divide
c) Northeast-Southwest divide
d) Three-way divide (South-Northeast-Northwest)
e) Three-way divide (North-Southeast-Southwest)
f) North-South-Caribbean divide (proposed by this_is_an_account)
g) Other.

236) Will Columbian Brettaniot have any spelling reforms?
a) Yes.
b) No.
c) Other.

Here are the top 5 major cities in Britain by population. They are all very similar to their OTL counterparts.

1. Lundin (OTL London) - From Latin Londinium
2. Mamoce (OTL Manchester) - From Latim Mamucium
3. Estain de Leme (OTL Liverpool) - Calque of Liverpool / From Old Brettaniot Estagna de Lema "pool of mud"
4. Leynse (OTL Leeds) - From the old Brythonic word Ladenses "people of the fast-flowing river"
5. Tameriuçe (OTL Plymouth) - From an ancient name for the city TAMARI OSTIA "mouth/estuaries of the Tamar"

The 8 provinces of Britain are Vianidoçe, Urduviçe, Dynhunie, Drevaçe, Cança, Lundin, Buraw, and Ragiçe. In English, the names are Gwynedd, Powys, Dumnonia, Drevatia, Kent, London, York, and Rheged. Here is a map of the provinces.

These are the sound changes that happened from Vulgar Latin to Modern Brettaniot.
Spoiler:
Vulgar Latin to Proto-Brettaniot
/ɪ ʊ/ > /i o/
/skʲ/ > /ʃ/
/kkʲ kʲ gʲ/ > /t͡ʃ t͡ʃ j~d͡ʒ/
/Cs Ct/ > /jʃ jt͡ʃ/
/tʲ dʲ/ > /t͡s d͡z/
/i u e o ɛ ɔ a/ > /i u ei ou iə uə æ~iə/ | in open syllables
/p b t d k g/ > /b v d ð g ɣ/ | between vowels
/i u e o ɛ ɔ a/ > /i u ə o ə o ə/ | unstressed
/u o ou ɔ/ > /y u u o/
/j/ > /d͡ʒ/ | word-initially
/jj/ > /d͡ʒ/ | in medial position
/mn kn gn nj/ > /ɲ/
/pl tl kl gl lj/ > /ʎ/
/t d/ > /θ ð/ /_#
Proto-Brettaniot to Old Brettaniot
/ɣ/ > /j/ | after front vowels
/ɣ/ > /w/
/y/ > /i/
/i u/ > /ɪ ʊ/ | unstressed
/iə uə/ > /ɪ ʊ/
/ij uj ɪj ʊj ej oj ɛj aj/ > /i ui ei oi ei oi ei ai/
/iw uw ɪw ʊw ew ow ɛw aw/ > /iu u eu ou eu ou eu au/
/ɪ ʊ/ > /e o/
The phoneme /h/ entered Old Brettaniot through loanwords.
/ə/ > /∅/ | word-finally
/f θ s/ > /v ð z/ | between vowels
/ui iu/ > /y/
Old Brettaniot to Middle Brettaniot
/y/ > /i/
/ɲ ʎ/ > /ɲ ʎ/, /jɲ~jn jʎ~jl/ after vowels
/ɛ/ > /ea/
/θ ð/ > /d/
/oi eu ei ou ea/ > /we jo je wo ja/
/wj jw/ > /wi ju/ | after consonants
/ai au/ > /ei ou/
The phonemes /ai au/ are reintroduced through loanwords.
/VCə/ > /VːC/
/t͡s d͡z/ > /s z/
/ɲ ʎ/ > /jn jl/ | in coda position
/ei ou ai au/ > /iː uː eː oː/ | unstressed
/e o/ > /i u/ (unstressed)
Middle Brettaniot to Early Modern Brettaniot
/Vi Vu/ > /iː uː/
/iː uː eː oː aː/ > /əi əu ei ou a/
/kw gw/ > /p b/
/r/ > /ʁ/ | only in the southeast (it becomes /ɹ/ elsewhere)
/əi əu ei ou/ > /eː oː iː uː/
/oː/ > /aː/ | when a low vowel follows
short /e o/ > /ɛ ɔ/
/a/ > /æ/
/tj dj sj zj/ > /sj zj sj zj/
/s z/ > /ʃ ʒ/ | after /u i j w/
/ɲ ʎ/ > /jn jl/ word-finally and before consonants, but are retained elsewhere.
Early Modern Brettaniot to Modern Brettaniot
/ə/ > /∅/ | VC_CV
Standard Brettaniot (Lundin)
Spoiler:
/r/ > /ʁ/
/i u ɛ ɔ æ/ > /ɪ ʊ ɛ ɔ æ/
/iː uː eː oː aː/ > /iː uː eː oː ɑː/
/Vʁ/ > /Vʁ/ (/Vχ/ before voiceless consonants)
/ei oi ai eu ou au/ > [eɪ oɪ æɪ eʊ oʊ ɑʊ]
/l/ > [l̴]
/ɲ ʎ/ > [nj lj]
/iː uː eː oː ɑː/ > [eɪ̯ oʊ̯ ɛː ɔː ɑː] after /ʁ/, and [ɪə̯ uə̯ eɐ̯ oɐ̯ ɑː] before /ʁ/
/ɪ ʊ ə ɛ ɔ æ/ > [ɪ ʊ ɐ ɛ ɔ ɑ] adjacent to /ʁ/
General Columbian Brettaniot (Nove Stocolme)
Spoiler:
/i u ə ɛ ɔ æ/ > [i u ɨ ɛ ɔ ɐ]
/iː uː eː oː aː/ > [iː uː eː oː aː]
/r/ > [ɹ]
/ei oi ai eu ou au/ > [ɛj ɔj aj ɛw ɔw aw]
/ɲ ʎ/ > [ɲ ʎ]
[iɹ uɹ ɨɹ ɛɹ ɔɹ ɐɹ] > [ɛɚ ɔɚ ɨɚ ɛɚ ɔɚ ɚ]
[iːɹ uːɹ eːɹ oːɹ aːɹ] > [iːɚ uːɚ eːɚ oːɚ aːɚ]
[ɛjɹ ɔjɹ ajɹ ɛwɹ ɔwɹ awɹ] > [ejɚ ojɚ ajɚ ewɚ owɚ awɚ]
And here's the phonology of Modern Brettaniot that most linguistics textbooks in this alternate universe would show you. It is meant to be a universal transcription. This is different from Standard Brettaniot, the dialect spoken in London. From this point forward, we will be merely defining dialectical differences.
Spoiler:
/m n ɲ/ - <m n gn~ni>
/p b t d k g/ - <p b t d c~qu g~gu> (/k g/ are only <qu gu> before the vowels <i>, <y>, and <e>, and /k/ can be written as <c~cq~q> word-finally)
/t͡ʃ d͡ʒ/ - <ci~c gi~g> (/t͡ʃ d͡ʒ/ are only <c g> before the vowels <i>, <y>, and <e>)
/f v s z ʃ/ - <f v s~ss~ç s~z sh~sc> (/ʃ/ is <sc> before front vowels and <s> when coming from former /s/)
/r l ʎ j w/ - <r l gl~li y~i w~u> (the spelling of /ʎ/ is determined etymologically, and /j w/ <i u> except initially, finally, and between vowels)
/kw gw/ - <qu~cu gu>
/i u ə ɛ ɔ æ/ - <i~y~e u~o e e~a o a> (the distinction between <i~y> /i/ and <e~a> /ə/ is determined etymologically)
/iː uː eː oː aː/ - <e~ae o~ao i~y~ai~ay~oi~oy~ae u~au~aw~eu~ew~ao u~au~aw~eu~ew~ao>
(Sequences of /eːC oːC iːC uːC/ can also be written as <iCe uCe eCe oCe>.)
Personal Pronouns:
Subject
Spoiler:
je
ti
ill
illa
nus
vus
ills
illas
Object
Spoiler:
me
te
le
le
nus
vus
les
les
Reflexive
Spoiler:
me
te
se
se
nus
vus
se
se
Disjunctive
Spoiler:
mey
tey
sey
sey
nus
vus
sey
sey
Voting closes on Saturday (September 28th) at 21:00 EDT. Results will be posted around 30 minutes after that.
Last edited by gokupwned5 on 22 Sep 2019 19:45, edited 1 time in total.

shimobaatar
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Re: British Romance Language Collablang

Post by shimobaatar » 22 Sep 2019 05:29

234: c
235: d
236: b

this_is_an_account
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Re: British Romance Language Collablang

Post by this_is_an_account » 22 Sep 2019 06:36

234: C
235: F, North-South-Caribbean
236: B

GoshDiggityDangit
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Re: British Romance Language Collablang

Post by GoshDiggityDangit » 22 Sep 2019 07:50

234: b
235: f (continental/island)
236: a

gokupwned5
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Re: British Romance Language Collablang

Post by gokupwned5 » 29 Sep 2019 17:35

The results are in!

--

234) It is 1870 CE. Northern Mexican rebels want to secede from the Mexican Empire and have a democratic government. What should the USC do?
c) We should stay out of it.

235) We have finished voting on the standard Columbian dialect of Brettaniot. What should the dialectical divide in the current USC be? For reference, the current USC has the territories of the OTL US right after the Louisiana Purchase in addition to Cuba, Haiti, the Bahamas, and Jamaica.
f) North-South-Caribbean divide (proposed by this_is_an_account)

236) Will Columbian Brettaniot have any spelling reforms?
b) No.

--

237) It is 1875 CE. The Russians fear that Sweden will gain control over Alaska as their North American colonies expand. Russia has put up Alaska for sale as a result. Should we buy Alaska?
a) Yes.
b) No.
c) Other.

238) How many dialects will there be in the Caribbean?
a) There will be 2 dialects, a northern one (the Bahamas) and a southern one (the rest of the Caribbean).
b) There will be 2 dialects, an eastern one (Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, the Lesser Antilles) and a western one (Cuba, Shaymaca, the Bahamas).
c) There will be 3 dialects, north (the Bahamas), southeast (Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, the Lesser Antilles), and southwest (Cuba and Shaymaca).
d) There will be 3 dialects, north (the Bahamas and Cuba), central (Shaymaca, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico), and south (the Lesser Antilles).
e) Most of the Caribbean will remain dominantly Spanish-speaking except for the Lesser Antilles, Shaymaca, and the Bahamas.
f) Other.

239) How many dialects will there be in the southern USC?
a) There will be one dialect.
b) There will be two dialects, a southern one (OTL Florida, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi) and a northern one (OTL remainder of the South).
c) There will be two dialects, an eastern one (OTL Carolinas, Georgia, Alabama, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Florida) and a western one (OTL remainder of the South).
d) Other.

240) How many dialects will there be in the northern USC?
a) There will be one dialect.
b) There will be two dialects, a northern one (OTL Michigan and Winsconsin plus the OTL Northeast minus Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, and New Jersey) and a southern one (OTL Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, Indiana, Illinois, Ohio).
c) There will be two dialects, an eastern one (OTL Northeast) and a western one (OTL Midwest).
d) Other.

241) What will be the fate of the Louisiana territory in terms of language?
a) It will become predominantly Brettaniot speaking.
b) It will remain predominantly French speaking.
c) French and Brettaniot will both have a large amount of speakers.
d) Other.

Here are the top 5 major cities in Britain by population. They are all very similar to their OTL counterparts.

1. Lundin (OTL London) - From Latin Londinium
2. Mamoce (OTL Manchester) - From Latim Mamucium
3. Estain de Leme (OTL Liverpool) - Calque of Liverpool / From Old Brettaniot Estagna de Lema "pool of mud"
4. Leynse (OTL Leeds) - From the old Brythonic word Ladenses "people of the fast-flowing river"
5. Tameriuçe (OTL Plymouth) - From an ancient name for the city TAMARI OSTIA "mouth/estuaries of the Tamar"

The 8 provinces of Britain are Vianidoçe, Urduviçe, Dynhunie, Drevaçe, Cança, Lundin, Buraw, and Ragiçe. In English, the names are Gwynedd, Powys, Dumnonia, Drevatia, Kent, London, York, and Rheged. Here is a map of the provinces.

These are the sound changes that happened from Vulgar Latin to Modern Brettaniot.
Spoiler:
Vulgar Latin to Proto-Brettaniot
/ɪ ʊ/ > /i o/
/skʲ/ > /ʃ/
/kkʲ kʲ gʲ/ > /t͡ʃ t͡ʃ j~d͡ʒ/
/Cs Ct/ > /jʃ jt͡ʃ/
/tʲ dʲ/ > /t͡s d͡z/
/i u e o ɛ ɔ a/ > /i u ei ou iə uə æ~iə/ | in open syllables
/p b t d k g/ > /b v d ð g ɣ/ | between vowels
/i u e o ɛ ɔ a/ > /i u ə o ə o ə/ | unstressed
/u o ou ɔ/ > /y u u o/
/j/ > /d͡ʒ/ | word-initially
/jj/ > /d͡ʒ/ | in medial position
/mn kn gn nj/ > /ɲ/
/pl tl kl gl lj/ > /ʎ/
/t d/ > /θ ð/ /_#
Proto-Brettaniot to Old Brettaniot
/ɣ/ > /j/ | after front vowels
/ɣ/ > /w/
/y/ > /i/
/i u/ > /ɪ ʊ/ | unstressed
/iə uə/ > /ɪ ʊ/
/ij uj ɪj ʊj ej oj ɛj aj/ > /i ui ei oi ei oi ei ai/
/iw uw ɪw ʊw ew ow ɛw aw/ > /iu u eu ou eu ou eu au/
/ɪ ʊ/ > /e o/
The phoneme /h/ entered Old Brettaniot through loanwords.
/ə/ > /∅/ | word-finally
/f θ s/ > /v ð z/ | between vowels
/ui iu/ > /y/
Old Brettaniot to Middle Brettaniot
/y/ > /i/
/ɲ ʎ/ > /ɲ ʎ/, /jɲ~jn jʎ~jl/ after vowels
/ɛ/ > /ea/
/θ ð/ > /d/
/oi eu ei ou ea/ > /we jo je wo ja/
/wj jw/ > /wi ju/ | after consonants
/ai au/ > /ei ou/
The phonemes /ai au/ are reintroduced through loanwords.
/VCə/ > /VːC/
/t͡s d͡z/ > /s z/
/ɲ ʎ/ > /jn jl/ | in coda position
/ei ou ai au/ > /iː uː eː oː/ | unstressed
/e o/ > /i u/ (unstressed)
Middle Brettaniot to Early Modern Brettaniot
/Vi Vu/ > /iː uː/
/iː uː eː oː aː/ > /əi əu ei ou a/
/kw gw/ > /p b/
/r/ > /ʁ/ | only in the southeast (it becomes /ɹ/ elsewhere)
/əi əu ei ou/ > /eː oː iː uː/
/oː/ > /aː/ | when a low vowel follows
short /e o/ > /ɛ ɔ/
/a/ > /æ/
/tj dj sj zj/ > /sj zj sj zj/
/s z/ > /ʃ ʒ/ | after /u i j w/
/ɲ ʎ/ > /jn jl/ word-finally and before consonants, but are retained elsewhere.
Early Modern Brettaniot to Modern Brettaniot
/ə/ > /∅/ | VC_CV
Standard Brettaniot (Lundin)
Spoiler:
/r/ > /ʁ/
/i u ɛ ɔ æ/ > /ɪ ʊ ɛ ɔ æ/
/iː uː eː oː aː/ > /iː uː eː oː ɑː/
/Vʁ/ > /Vʁ/ (/Vχ/ before voiceless consonants)
/ei oi ai eu ou au/ > [eɪ oɪ æɪ eʊ oʊ ɑʊ]
/l/ > [l̴]
/ɲ ʎ/ > [nj lj]
/iː uː eː oː ɑː/ > [eɪ̯ oʊ̯ ɛː ɔː ɑː] after /ʁ/, and [ɪə̯ uə̯ eɐ̯ oɐ̯ ɑː] before /ʁ/
/ɪ ʊ ə ɛ ɔ æ/ > [ɪ ʊ ɐ ɛ ɔ ɑ] adjacent to /ʁ/
General Columbian Brettaniot (Nove Stocolme)
Spoiler:
/i u ə ɛ ɔ æ/ > [i u ɨ ɛ ɔ ɐ]
/iː uː eː oː aː/ > [iː uː eː oː aː]
/r/ > [ɹ]
/ei oi ai eu ou au/ > [ɛj ɔj aj ɛw ɔw aw]
/ɲ ʎ/ > [ɲ ʎ]
[iɹ uɹ ɨɹ ɛɹ ɔɹ ɐɹ] > [ɛɚ ɔɚ ɨɚ ɛɚ ɔɚ ɚ]
[iːɹ uːɹ eːɹ oːɹ aːɹ] > [iːɚ uːɚ eːɚ oːɚ aːɚ]
[ɛjɹ ɔjɹ ajɹ ɛwɹ ɔwɹ awɹ] > [ejɚ ojɚ ajɚ ewɚ owɚ awɚ]
And here's the phonology of Modern Brettaniot that most linguistics textbooks in this alternate universe would show you. It is meant to be a universal transcription. This is different from Standard Brettaniot, the dialect spoken in London. From this point forward, we will be merely defining dialectical differences.
Spoiler:
/m n ɲ/ - <m n gn~ni>
/p b t d k g/ - <p b t d c~qu g~gu> (/k g/ are only <qu gu> before the vowels <i>, <y>, and <e>, and /k/ can be written as <c~cq~q> word-finally)
/t͡ʃ d͡ʒ/ - <ci~c gi~g> (/t͡ʃ d͡ʒ/ are only <c g> before the vowels <i>, <y>, and <e>)
/f v s z ʃ/ - <f v s~ss~ç s~z sh~sc> (/ʃ/ is <sc> before front vowels and <s> when coming from former /s/)
/r l ʎ j w/ - <r l gl~li y~i w~u> (the spelling of /ʎ/ is determined etymologically, and /j w/ <i u> except initially, finally, and between vowels)
/kw gw/ - <qu~cu gu>
/i u ə ɛ ɔ æ/ - <i~y~e u~o e e~a o a> (the distinction between <i~y> /i/ and <e~a> /ə/ is determined etymologically)
/iː uː eː oː aː/ - <e~ae o~ao i~y~ai~ay~oi~oy~ae u~au~aw~eu~ew~ao u~au~aw~eu~ew~ao>
(Sequences of /eːC oːC iːC uːC/ can also be written as <iCe uCe eCe oCe>.)
Personal Pronouns:
Subject
Spoiler:
je
ti
ill
illa
nus
vus
ills
illas
Object
Spoiler:
me
te
le
le
nus
vus
les
les
Reflexive
Spoiler:
me
te
se
se
nus
vus
se
se
Disjunctive
Spoiler:
mey
tey
sey
sey
nus
vus
sey
sey
Voting closes on Saturday (October 5th) at 21:00 EDT. Results will be posted around 30 minutes after that.

shimobaatar
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Re: British Romance Language Collablang

Post by shimobaatar » 29 Sep 2019 17:54

237: b
238: d
239: c
240: c
241: c

gokupwned5
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Re: British Romance Language Collablang

Post by gokupwned5 » 29 Sep 2019 18:03

237. B
238. C
239. C
240. B
241. C

this_is_an_account
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Re: British Romance Language Collablang

Post by this_is_an_account » 29 Sep 2019 22:49

237: B
238: E
239: B
240: B
241: C

GoshDiggityDangit
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Re: British Romance Language Collablang

Post by GoshDiggityDangit » 03 Oct 2019 06:20

237: a
238: c
239: a
240: b
241: c

gokupwned5
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Re: British Romance Language Collablang

Post by gokupwned5 » 06 Oct 2019 17:30

I have extended the deadline to vote by another week. You have 6 days left as of today (October 6, 2019).

gokupwned5
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Re: British Romance Language Collablang

Post by gokupwned5 » 13 Oct 2019 03:16

The results are in!

--

237) It is 1875 CE. The Russians fear that Sweden will gain control over Alaska as their North American colonies expand. Russia has put up Alaska for sale as a result. Should we buy Alaska?
b) No.

238) How many dialects will there be in the Caribbean?
c) There will be 3 dialects, north (the Bahamas), southeast (Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, the Lesser Antilles), and southwest (Cuba and Shaymaca).

239) How many dialects will there be in the southern USC?
c) There will be two dialects, an eastern one (OTL Carolinas, Georgia, Alabama, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Florida) and a western one (OTL remainder of the South).

240) How many dialects will there be in the northern USC?
b) There will be two dialects, a northern one (OTL Michigan and Winsconsin plus the OTL Northeast minus Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, and New Jersey) and a southern one (OTL Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, Indiana, Illinois, Ohio).

241) What will be the fate of the Louisiana territory in terms of language?
c) French and Brettaniot will both have a large amount of speakers.

--

242) We are nearing the end of the historical scenario questions. It is 1905 CE, and the Great War has started due to tensions between the Mamluk Caliphate and Austria-Hungary, due to the assassination of the Mamluk Caliph's heir by a Balkan extremist backed by Austria-Hungary. Now, all of Europe has gotten involved, with the exception of Russia, Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. Should the USC get involved?
a) Yes.
b) No.
c) Other.

243) A large influx of immigrants have been entering the USC from the Mamluk Sultanate (mainly from the Levant), as well as Eastern Europe, due to religious persecution and famine. Should the USC restrict the number of immigrants entering its borders?
a) Yes.
b) No.
c) Other.

244) What language-related things would you like to vote on from now on?
a) The features of various Brettaniot dialects.
b) Possible Brettaniot-based creoles.
c) Other.

Here are the top 5 major cities in Britain by population. They are all very similar to their OTL counterparts.

1. Lundin (OTL London) - From Latin Londinium
2. Mamoce (OTL Manchester) - From Latim Mamucium
3. Estain de Leme (OTL Liverpool) - Calque of Liverpool / From Old Brettaniot Estagna de Lema "pool of mud"
4. Leynse (OTL Leeds) - From the old Brythonic word Ladenses "people of the fast-flowing river"
5. Tameriuçe (OTL Plymouth) - From an ancient name for the city TAMARI OSTIA "mouth/estuaries of the Tamar"

The 8 provinces of Britain are Vianidoçe, Urduviçe, Dynhunie, Drevaçe, Cança, Lundin, Buraw, and Ragiçe. In English, the names are Gwynedd, Powys, Dumnonia, Drevatia, Kent, London, York, and Rheged. Here is a map of the provinces.

These are the sound changes that happened from Vulgar Latin to Modern Brettaniot.
Spoiler:
Vulgar Latin to Proto-Brettaniot
/ɪ ʊ/ > /i o/
/skʲ/ > /ʃ/
/kkʲ kʲ gʲ/ > /t͡ʃ t͡ʃ j~d͡ʒ/
/Cs Ct/ > /jʃ jt͡ʃ/
/tʲ dʲ/ > /t͡s d͡z/
/i u e o ɛ ɔ a/ > /i u ei ou iə uə æ~iə/ | in open syllables
/p b t d k g/ > /b v d ð g ɣ/ | between vowels
/i u e o ɛ ɔ a/ > /i u ə o ə o ə/ | unstressed
/u o ou ɔ/ > /y u u o/
/j/ > /d͡ʒ/ | word-initially
/jj/ > /d͡ʒ/ | in medial position
/mn kn gn nj/ > /ɲ/
/pl tl kl gl lj/ > /ʎ/
/t d/ > /θ ð/ /_#
Proto-Brettaniot to Old Brettaniot
/ɣ/ > /j/ | after front vowels
/ɣ/ > /w/
/y/ > /i/
/i u/ > /ɪ ʊ/ | unstressed
/iə uə/ > /ɪ ʊ/
/ij uj ɪj ʊj ej oj ɛj aj/ > /i ui ei oi ei oi ei ai/
/iw uw ɪw ʊw ew ow ɛw aw/ > /iu u eu ou eu ou eu au/
/ɪ ʊ/ > /e o/
The phoneme /h/ entered Old Brettaniot through loanwords.
/ə/ > /∅/ | word-finally
/f θ s/ > /v ð z/ | between vowels
/ui iu/ > /y/
Old Brettaniot to Middle Brettaniot
/y/ > /i/
/ɲ ʎ/ > /ɲ ʎ/, /jɲ~jn jʎ~jl/ after vowels
/ɛ/ > /ea/
/θ ð/ > /d/
/oi eu ei ou ea/ > /we jo je wo ja/
/wj jw/ > /wi ju/ | after consonants
/ai au/ > /ei ou/
The phonemes /ai au/ are reintroduced through loanwords.
/VCə/ > /VːC/
/t͡s d͡z/ > /s z/
/ɲ ʎ/ > /jn jl/ | in coda position
/ei ou ai au/ > /iː uː eː oː/ | unstressed
/e o/ > /i u/ (unstressed)
Middle Brettaniot to Early Modern Brettaniot
/Vi Vu/ > /iː uː/
/iː uː eː oː aː/ > /əi əu ei ou a/
/kw gw/ > /p b/
/r/ > /ʁ/ | only in the southeast (it becomes /ɹ/ elsewhere)
/əi əu ei ou/ > /eː oː iː uː/
/oː/ > /aː/ | when a low vowel follows
short /e o/ > /ɛ ɔ/
/a/ > /æ/
/tj dj sj zj/ > /sj zj sj zj/
/s z/ > /ʃ ʒ/ | after /u i j w/
/ɲ ʎ/ > /jn jl/ word-finally and before consonants, but are retained elsewhere.
Early Modern Brettaniot to Modern Brettaniot
/ə/ > /∅/ | VC_CV
Standard Brettaniot (Lundin)
Spoiler:
/r/ > /ʁ/
/i u ɛ ɔ æ/ > /ɪ ʊ ɛ ɔ æ/
/iː uː eː oː aː/ > /iː uː eː oː ɑː/
/Vʁ/ > /Vʁ/ (/Vχ/ before voiceless consonants)
/ei oi ai eu ou au/ > [eɪ oɪ æɪ eʊ oʊ ɑʊ]
/l/ > [l̴]
/ɲ ʎ/ > [nj lj]
/iː uː eː oː ɑː/ > [eɪ̯ oʊ̯ ɛː ɔː ɑː] after /ʁ/, and [ɪə̯ uə̯ eɐ̯ oɐ̯ ɑː] before /ʁ/
/ɪ ʊ ə ɛ ɔ æ/ > [ɪ ʊ ɐ ɛ ɔ ɑ] adjacent to /ʁ/
General Columbian Brettaniot (Nove Stocolme)
Spoiler:
/i u ə ɛ ɔ æ/ > [i u ɨ ɛ ɔ ɐ]
/iː uː eː oː aː/ > [iː uː eː oː aː]
/r/ > [ɹ]
/ei oi ai eu ou au/ > [ɛj ɔj aj ɛw ɔw aw]
/ɲ ʎ/ > [ɲ ʎ]
[iɹ uɹ ɨɹ ɛɹ ɔɹ ɐɹ] > [ɛɚ ɔɚ ɨɚ ɛɚ ɔɚ ɚ]
[iːɹ uːɹ eːɹ oːɹ aːɹ] > [iːɚ uːɚ eːɚ oːɚ aːɚ]
[ɛjɹ ɔjɹ ajɹ ɛwɹ ɔwɹ awɹ] > [ejɚ ojɚ ajɚ ewɚ owɚ awɚ]
And here's the phonology of Modern Brettaniot that most linguistics textbooks in this alternate universe would show you. It is meant to be a universal transcription. This is different from Standard Brettaniot, the dialect spoken in London. From this point forward, we will be merely defining dialectical differences.
Spoiler:
/m n ɲ/ - <m n gn~ni>
/p b t d k g/ - <p b t d c~qu g~gu> (/k g/ are only <qu gu> before the vowels <i>, <y>, and <e>, and /k/ can be written as <c~cq~q> word-finally)
/t͡ʃ d͡ʒ/ - <ci~c gi~g> (/t͡ʃ d͡ʒ/ are only <c g> before the vowels <i>, <y>, and <e>)
/f v s z ʃ/ - <f v s~ss~ç s~z sh~sc> (/ʃ/ is <sc> before front vowels and <s> when coming from former /s/)
/r l ʎ j w/ - <r l gl~li y~i w~u> (the spelling of /ʎ/ is determined etymologically, and /j w/ <i u> except initially, finally, and between vowels)
/kw gw/ - <qu~cu gu>
/i u ə ɛ ɔ æ/ - <i~y~e u~o e e~a o a> (the distinction between <i~y> /i/ and <e~a> /ə/ is determined etymologically)
/iː uː eː oː aː/ - <e~ae o~ao i~y~ai~ay~oi~oy~ae u~au~aw~eu~ew~ao u~au~aw~eu~ew~ao>
(Sequences of /eːC oːC iːC uːC/ can also be written as <iCe uCe eCe oCe>.)
Personal Pronouns:
Subject
Spoiler:
je
ti
ill
illa
nus
vus
ills
illas
Object
Spoiler:
me
te
le
le
nus
vus
les
les
Reflexive
Spoiler:
me
te
se
se
nus
vus
se
se
Disjunctive
Spoiler:
mey
tey
sey
sey
nus
vus
sey
sey
Voting closes on Saturday (October 19th) at 21:00 EDT. Results will be posted around 30 minutes after that.

shimobaatar
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Posts: 11690
Joined: 12 Jul 2013 23:09
Location: PA → IN

Re: British Romance Language Collablang

Post by shimobaatar » 13 Oct 2019 03:43

242: b
243: b
244: a

GoshDiggityDangit
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Posts: 132
Joined: 18 Dec 2018 21:27
Location: Misawa AFB, Aomori, Japan

Re: British Romance Language Collablang

Post by GoshDiggityDangit » 13 Oct 2019 08:41

242: a
243: b
244: b

gokupwned5
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sinic
Posts: 301
Joined: 12 Aug 2016 16:05

Re: British Romance Language Collablang

Post by gokupwned5 » 22 Oct 2019 03:42

There was a tie on 2/3 questions, so I'm extending the deadline to vote by another week.

this_is_an_account
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Posts: 152
Joined: 14 Aug 2018 06:33

Re: British Romance Language Collablang

Post by this_is_an_account » 22 Oct 2019 22:26

242: A
243: A
244: A

gokupwned5
sinic
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Posts: 301
Joined: 12 Aug 2016 16:05

Re: British Romance Language Collablang

Post by gokupwned5 » 27 Oct 2019 03:07

The results are in!

--

242) We are nearing the end of the historical scenario questions. It is 1905 CE, and the Great War has started due to tensions between the Mamluk Caliphate and Austria-Hungary, due to the assassination of the Mamluk Caliph's heir by a Balkan extremist backed by Austria-Hungary. Now, all of Europe has gotten involved, with the exception of Russia, Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. Should the USC get involved?
a) Yes.

243) A large influx of immigrants have been entering the USC from the Mamluk Sultanate (mainly from the Levant), as well as Eastern Europe, due to religious persecution and famine. Should the USC restrict the number of immigrants entering its borders?
b) No.

244) What language-related things would you like to vote on from now on?
a) The features of various Brettaniot dialects.

--

245) The history of the world played out pretty different from OTL. The Allies (USC, Britain, Holy Roman Republic, Spain, Portugal, Austria-Hungary) won and punished the power-hungry French by taking Alsace-Lorraine, Burgundy, and Franche-Comté, and turning them into the independent Republic of Burgundy, a satellite state of the Holy Roman Republic. Afterwards, there was not a second World War until later, but the French still resented the rest of Europe due to their losses. As a result, the European colonies in Africa have yet to gain their independence. It is now 1950 CE, and elections are being held in the USC. Who should be our next president?
a) Edward Chibas - Progressive Party
b) Joseph McCarthy - Democratic Party
c) Richard FitzNicke - Centrist Party
d) Other.

246) Which dialect should we vote on next?
a) Eastern Central Brettaniot (proposed by shimobaatar)
b) Bahamian Brettaniot (proposed by GoshDiggityDangit)
List your proposals here.

Here is a list of all the Brettaniot dialects in the USC

Northern USC Dialects
Northern Brettaniot - Northern North (OTL Michigan and Winsconsin plus the OTL Northeast minus Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, and New Jersey)
General Columbian Brettaniot - Southern North (OTL Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, Indiana, Illinois, Ohio).

Southern USC Dialects
Eastern Central Brettaniot - Eastern South (OTL Carolinas, Georgia, Alabama, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Florida)
Western Central Brettaniot - Western South (OTL remainder of the South).
The name Central is used because relative to the rest of the USC, they are located towards the middle.

Caribbean Dialects
Bahamian Brettaniot - North Caribbean (the Bahamas)
Southeastern Brettaniot - Southeast Caribbean (Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, the Lesser Antilles)
Southwestern Brettaniot - Southwest Caribbean (Cuba and Shaymaca)

Here is some info about the political parties of the USC.

There are currently three distinct political factions in the USC (Progressive, Centrist, and Democratic). The Progressive faction leans left and the Democratic faction leans right. The Centrist faction has both left-leaning and right-leaning members, but also a lot of centrists. The Centrist Party mainly supports Populist ideals and supports the abolition of racial segregation in the USC. The Progressive Party also supports abolishing racial segregation, promoting gender equality, and the development of new technologies and innovation to improve the economy. Centrists also support this innovation. The Democratic Party is the opposite. At the moment, they have more traditionalist values, and tend to uphold racial segregation, although some Democrats believe segregation is wrong.

These are the sound changes that happened from Vulgar Latin to Modern Brettaniot.
Spoiler:
Vulgar Latin to Proto-Brettaniot
/ɪ ʊ/ > /i o/
/skʲ/ > /ʃ/
/kkʲ kʲ gʲ/ > /t͡ʃ t͡ʃ j~d͡ʒ/
/Cs Ct/ > /jʃ jt͡ʃ/
/tʲ dʲ/ > /t͡s d͡z/
/i u e o ɛ ɔ a/ > /i u ei ou iə uə æ~iə/ | in open syllables
/p b t d k g/ > /b v d ð g ɣ/ | between vowels
/i u e o ɛ ɔ a/ > /i u ə o ə o ə/ | unstressed
/u o ou ɔ/ > /y u u o/
/j/ > /d͡ʒ/ | word-initially
/jj/ > /d͡ʒ/ | in medial position
/mn kn gn nj/ > /ɲ/
/pl tl kl gl lj/ > /ʎ/
/t d/ > /θ ð/ /_#
Proto-Brettaniot to Old Brettaniot
/ɣ/ > /j/ | after front vowels
/ɣ/ > /w/
/y/ > /i/
/i u/ > /ɪ ʊ/ | unstressed
/iə uə/ > /ɪ ʊ/
/ij uj ɪj ʊj ej oj ɛj aj/ > /i ui ei oi ei oi ei ai/
/iw uw ɪw ʊw ew ow ɛw aw/ > /iu u eu ou eu ou eu au/
/ɪ ʊ/ > /e o/
The phoneme /h/ entered Old Brettaniot through loanwords.
/ə/ > /∅/ | word-finally
/f θ s/ > /v ð z/ | between vowels
/ui iu/ > /y/
Old Brettaniot to Middle Brettaniot
/y/ > /i/
/ɲ ʎ/ > /ɲ ʎ/, /jɲ~jn jʎ~jl/ after vowels
/ɛ/ > /ea/
/θ ð/ > /d/
/oi eu ei ou ea/ > /we jo je wo ja/
/wj jw/ > /wi ju/ | after consonants
/ai au/ > /ei ou/
The phonemes /ai au/ are reintroduced through loanwords.
/VCə/ > /VːC/
/t͡s d͡z/ > /s z/
/ɲ ʎ/ > /jn jl/ | in coda position
/ei ou ai au/ > /iː uː eː oː/ | unstressed
/e o/ > /i u/ (unstressed)
Middle Brettaniot to Early Modern Brettaniot
/Vi Vu/ > /iː uː/
/iː uː eː oː aː/ > /əi əu ei ou a/
/kw gw/ > /p b/
/r/ > /ʁ/ | only in the southeast (it becomes /ɹ/ elsewhere)
/əi əu ei ou/ > /eː oː iː uː/
/oː/ > /aː/ | when a low vowel follows
short /e o/ > /ɛ ɔ/
/a/ > /æ/
/tj dj sj zj/ > /sj zj sj zj/
/s z/ > /ʃ ʒ/ | after /u i j w/
/ɲ ʎ/ > /jn jl/ word-finally and before consonants, but are retained elsewhere.
Early Modern Brettaniot to Modern Brettaniot
/ə/ > /∅/ | VC_CV
Standard Brettaniot (Lundin)
Spoiler:
/r/ > /ʁ/
/i u ɛ ɔ æ/ > /ɪ ʊ ɛ ɔ æ/
/iː uː eː oː aː/ > /iː uː eː oː ɑː/
/Vʁ/ > /Vʁ/ (/Vχ/ before voiceless consonants)
/ei oi ai eu ou au/ > [eɪ oɪ æɪ eʊ oʊ ɑʊ]
/l/ > [l̴]
/ɲ ʎ/ > [nj lj]
/iː uː eː oː ɑː/ > [eɪ̯ oʊ̯ ɛː ɔː ɑː] after /ʁ/, and [ɪə̯ uə̯ eɐ̯ oɐ̯ ɑː] before /ʁ/
/ɪ ʊ ə ɛ ɔ æ/ > [ɪ ʊ ɐ ɛ ɔ ɑ] adjacent to /ʁ/
General Columbian Brettaniot (Nove Stocolme)
Spoiler:
/i u ə ɛ ɔ æ/ > [i u ɨ ɛ ɔ ɐ]
/iː uː eː oː aː/ > [iː uː eː oː aː]
/r/ > [ɹ]
/ei oi ai eu ou au/ > [ɛj ɔj aj ɛw ɔw aw]
/ɲ ʎ/ > [ɲ ʎ]
[iɹ uɹ ɨɹ ɛɹ ɔɹ ɐɹ] > [ɛɚ ɔɚ ɨɚ ɛɚ ɔɚ ɚ]
[iːɹ uːɹ eːɹ oːɹ aːɹ] > [iːɚ uːɚ eːɚ oːɚ aːɚ]
[ɛjɹ ɔjɹ ajɹ ɛwɹ ɔwɹ awɹ] > [ejɚ ojɚ ajɚ ewɚ owɚ awɚ]
And here's the phonology of Modern Brettaniot that most linguistics textbooks in this alternate universe would show you. It is meant to be a universal transcription. This is different from Standard Brettaniot, the dialect spoken in London. From this point forward, we will be merely defining dialectical differences.
Spoiler:
/m n ɲ/ - <m n gn~ni>
/p b t d k g/ - <p b t d c~qu g~gu> (/k g/ are only <qu gu> before the vowels <i>, <y>, and <e>, and /k/ can be written as <c~cq~q> word-finally)
/t͡ʃ d͡ʒ/ - <ci~c gi~g> (/t͡ʃ d͡ʒ/ are only <c g> before the vowels <i>, <y>, and <e>)
/f v s z ʃ/ - <f v s~ss~ç s~z sh~sc> (/ʃ/ is <sc> before front vowels and <s> when coming from former /s/)
/r l ʎ j w/ - <r l gl~li y~i w~u> (the spelling of /ʎ/ is determined etymologically, and /j w/ <i u> except initially, finally, and between vowels)
/kw gw/ - <qu~cu gu>
/i u ə ɛ ɔ æ/ - <i~y~e u~o e e~a o a> (the distinction between <i~y> /i/ and <e~a> /ə/ is determined etymologically)
/iː uː eː oː aː/ - <e~ae o~ao i~y~ai~ay~oi~oy~ae u~au~aw~eu~ew~ao u~au~aw~eu~ew~ao>
(Sequences of /eːC oːC iːC uːC/ can also be written as <iCe uCe eCe oCe>.)
Personal Pronouns:
Subject
Spoiler:
je
ti
ill
illa
nus
vus
ills
illas
Object
Spoiler:
me
te
le
le
nus
vus
les
les
Reflexive
Spoiler:
me
te
se
se
nus
vus
se
se
Disjunctive
Spoiler:
mey
tey
sey
sey
nus
vus
sey
sey
Voting closes on Saturday (November 2nd) at 21:00 EDT. Results will be posted around 30 minutes after that.
Last edited by gokupwned5 on 02 Nov 2019 00:24, edited 3 times in total.

shimobaatar
korean
korean
Posts: 11690
Joined: 12 Jul 2013 23:09
Location: PA → IN

Re: British Romance Language Collablang

Post by shimobaatar » 27 Oct 2019 03:21

245: a
246: a (the dialect spoken in the Carolinas, Georgia, Alabama, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Florida)

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