Yǒłra'eli

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Shemtov
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Yǒłra'eli

Post by Shemtov » 16 Oct 2018 18:54

I would like to start this project by saying that it is based on my own Religious views. However, as it is pure speculation, I hope that people understand, and if they do not wish to read further I understand.

Yǒłra'eli is the language of the Ten Tribes, descended from Ancient Hebrew. They live in an undiscovered valley in Gilgit-Baltistan, sorrounded by the Sambachõ river.


Phonology:
/p~f b~v t~θ d~ð t͡ʃ d͡ʒ k~x g~ɣ ʔ/ <p~f b~v T~th d~dh ch j k~x g~ǧ '>
/s z ʃ ɬ~l h/ <s z š ł~l h~h̠>
/ɾ~r/ <r~rr>
/m n/ <m n>
/j w/ <y w>

/i y u/ <i ü u>
/e ø o/ <e ö o>
/ɛ œ ʌ ɔ/ <è ȍ ǒ ò>
/a/
/æ̃ ɑ̃ œ̃/ <ẽ õ œ̃>

/h/ is realized as [x] syllable finally, which is expressed as <h̠>
The consonants that have two allophones are called the Bèǧèladh Kǒfèrrèth Consonants. They occur as the "weaker" version intervocally or word-finally.

Nouns come in Masculine and Feminine. They have two numbers, singular and plural. All feminine nouns end in <th> or <ò>, though some that end in <th> are Masculine.
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien

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Shemtov
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Re: Yǒłra'eli

Post by Shemtov » 16 Oct 2018 19:19

Masculines come in two declensions for the plural:
The œ̃ declension and the õ declencsion.
The former is more common:
'ȍdh
"Hand"
'ȍdhœ̃
"Hands"

An example of the õ-declension:
'ah̠
"Brother"
'ahõ
"Brothers"

There are some suppletive plurals:
Chèlèv
"Dog"

Kłavœ̃
"Dogs"

Feminines come in two declensions also: the -th declension and the ∅ declension:
Suxò
"tent"
Suxòth
"Tents"

Bòth
"Daughter; Daughters"


Nouns can be made definite by the article, which declines for tense and number:
Hǒ 'ah̠
"The Brother"

Hœ̃ 'ahõ
"The brothers"

Hò bòth
"The daughter"

Hǒth bòth
"The Daughters"

Possesion is formed with the particle Dǒ:
Hǒth bòth dǒ Hushẽ
"The daughters of Hushẽ"
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien

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Isfendil
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Re: Yǒłra'eli

Post by Isfendil » 16 Oct 2018 19:36

Diachronically modern hebrew in .... The Caucasus? Well wherever it is, its wonderful!

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Re: Yǒłra'eli

Post by Shemtov » 16 Oct 2018 19:43

Isfendil wrote:
16 Oct 2018 19:36
Diachronically modern hebrew in .... The Caucasus? Well wherever it is, its wonderful!
Actually, in Pakistan. The protolanguage was a very Aramaic influenced dialect of Hebrew, and it has words from Dravidian, Iranian, Elamite and possible relatives of Burashaski
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien

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Re: Yǒłra'eli

Post by Isfendil » 16 Oct 2018 20:14

Shemtov wrote:
16 Oct 2018 19:43
Isfendil wrote:
16 Oct 2018 19:36
Diachronically modern hebrew in .... The Caucasus? Well wherever it is, its wonderful!
Actually, in Pakistan. The protolanguage was a very Aramaic influenced dialect of Hebrew, and it has words from Dravidian, Iranian, Elamite and possible relatives of Burashaski
Oh well then there's a slight chronological error in the OP I think, as Aramaic did not have the stop-spirant alternation until after the Assyrian period as I understand it, and became featural in biblical hebrew, not ancient- though, you may be using in universe terminology and such terminology is probably different...

Also what is the etymology of gilgit?

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Re: Yǒłra'eli

Post by Shemtov » 16 Oct 2018 20:46

Isfendil wrote:
16 Oct 2018 20:14
Shemtov wrote:
16 Oct 2018 19:43
Isfendil wrote:
16 Oct 2018 19:36
Diachronically modern hebrew in .... The Caucasus? Well wherever it is, its wonderful!
Actually, in Pakistan. The protolanguage was a very Aramaic influenced dialect of Hebrew, and it has words from Dravidian, Iranian, Elamite and possible relatives of Burashaski
Oh well then there's a slight chronological error in the OP I think, as Aramaic did not have the stop-spirant alternation until after the Assyrian period as I understand it, and became featural in biblical hebrew, not ancient- though, you may be using in universe terminology and such terminology is probably different...

Also what is the etymology of gilgit?
As I said, I am using what I consider to be the Hebrew spoken around the time period, which did have the BGDKFT alternations, and as I expressed there, I hope that people will accept this as an alt-world, especially given the fact that I do not believe this is the Hebrew spoken by the Ten Tribes, as it is all speculation in my head. Even from my perspective, they could have dropped the definite article entirely, or the original language was more a Hebrew-Aramaic-Akkadian mixed language, even a creole; it is all speculation. There is in fact a legend that they were contacted 1000 years ago, and their language was mutually comprehensible with Ashkenazi-Hebrew. One could also read this as the BGDKFT rules evolving independently; this may be supported by the fact that śin fused with lamed to be part of the series, and reish was added, and also the fact that even Teth and Quf when they lost their emphaticness also became subject to BGDKFT.
Gilgit-Baltistan is the IRL name of the IRL territory of Pakistan that I have placed them in. They would refer to their home as Gaya' dǒ Sambachõ
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien

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