Introduction to Sikwenchu

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shukudai
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Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by shukudai » 22 Dec 2018 03:59

Hi everyone,

I'm brand new to the board this evening. I'm trying to see if there is any interest in my new language that I've started to publish - Sikwenchu.
Key highlight are:

* No direct conjugation of any verb; instead, tense markers precede the verb.
* No masculine/feminine forms for nouns, adjectives, etc.
* Consistent vowel pronunciation, allowing for contextual learning to begin much sooner.
* Strong emphasis on common word patterns and single syllables for many words. For instance, two women, Yanatasa and Midivili simply serve as memory jogs. Ya - I, Na - You, Ta - He, Sa - She.
* It only takes 4 to 7 weeks to begin having practical, everyday conversations with just 15 minutes of study per day. Though that likely sounds unrealistic, what made a difference with Sikwenchu™ was not only did I radically simplify the grammar, as I did in my first language about 5 years ago, but this time around I solved the puzzle, a genuine breakthrough, by categorizing and encoding most nouns, adjectives, adverbs, etc., so that you only have to remember a fractionally smaller set of keywords to logically arrive at the other words in the category. Think of it this way - instead of memorizing 800 disparate nouns, it becomes far easier to remember just 100 keywords that are logically connected.
After just 6 weeks of just typing up the first volume, Essential Grammar, I was already able to express my thoughts much easier in Sikwenchu™ than I was in French, Japanese, Spanish, and Chinese, which I have been studying for several years. I was even quite shocked at how effective the approach turned out to be. It's a genuine breakthrough in universal language communication, I sincerely believe. I had solved the grammar simplification in my first language attempt, but it took another 4 to 5 years to solve the vocabulary memorization challenge. You can find the book on Amazon, and I've started posting Sikwenchu™ lessons on YouTube as well.

Thank you most sincerely for taking a look.

Mark Gregory
Author of the Sikwenchu™ language.

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by Corphishy » 24 Dec 2018 10:35

Good morning (I say writing this at like 4 AM), and welcome to the forum! I have a few questions and comments.

1) Is Sikwenchu a play on Sequential? If so, I would like to know what the reason for that is? I would then also like to know if this language is a posteriori, and to what extent.

2) Why does your language with no sex-based gender system have a masculine and feminine animate pronoun? The overwhelming majority of natural languages do not distinguish gender in their third person pronouns, especially those who do not have a gender or noun class system. English only has it as a relic of a time when it did have a gender system, and in languages with a gender system they are used more as a form of agreement than to distinguish males and females. Also, I feel as if in a language designed for international use for anybody, that specifically only including two sex-based gendered third person pronouns is problematic.

3) While you can certainly trademark a book, you can't trademark a language as far as I am aware. Also, I think that that kind of safeguarding attitude is counterproductive to people wanting to learn and use your language. Because what you, I assume, want from your project is people learning your language, using it with people, and teaching it to their children. And by the time a child knows your conlang natively (if that is your goal), you can no longer claim any ownership of it because they will not speak it in the same way you created it.

4) I am alway skeptical when I hear that a conlang has "simple grammar." The phrase itself seems to mean something different to everyone. Personally, I don't think that any given language is more or less grammatically complex because calling one language complex and another simple has some problematic connotations in the natlang world (ie "primitive" languages or the idea that proto-languages are less complex than their daughters somehow). I would like to know in what ways the grammar of this language is simplified, so that I (and by extention any other reader of this thread) could know more about your design philosophy.

Again it is late/early and it's taken me close to a half hour to write this. I am not personally apart of the auxlang community (I'm generally not even much of a fan of auxlangs) so I'm not the person to turn to when it comes to informed feedback on them. I'm just giving you my takeaway from reading your post. Good luck and gosh speed my dude.
Aszev wrote:A good conlang doesn't come from pursuing uniqueness. Uniqueness is usually an effect from creating a good conlang.
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(used to be Bulbichu22)

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by shukudai » 24 Dec 2018 16:38

Hi there,

Thanks kindly for the feedback. In response to your questions...

1) Sikwenchu™ means "Sequence Language". "Sikwen" means "Sequence" and "chu" is the verb meaning "to go", which is a play on words as the Japanese language appends "go" onto some country names, turning it from the country name into the language. (Nihon and Nihongo). It's the categorization of a sequence of patterns, sounds, procedures, events, stories and many other methods, that get encoded into the words to make it far easier to memorize and retain a large vocabulary.

The design of Sikwenchu™ has roots in Chinese, Japanese, French and Spanish, from a grammatical perspective. Verb conjugation tends to be one big obstacles that prevents many students from learning a language; memorizing a huge vocabulary is the other. So I chose to conquer both problems so that a language could be learned in a far simpler way, and in a much shorter period of time.

2) After having studied some Chinese, which only has "ta" for a male/female pronoun, I always found it confusing to determine who someone was talking about in a group situation, unless it was in writing, as it is distinguished that way in Chinese. As such, I chose to use "ta" for "he" and "sa" for "she". By eliminating the gender forms forms in adjectives, nouns, etc., it greatly reduces the amount of work required to learn the language, to the tune of thousands of combinations that one no longer has to try and conquer for rapid recall in a conversation. Even if one learns all the grammar rules, it's still a boatload more work than not having the gender forms, which makes the language much easier and quicker to learn. That was the goal - to make the language ultra-easy and quick to learn for as many people as possible, opening the doors for hundreds of millions of individuals to be able to learn a common language. I don't mind studying hours and hours per day studying a language, for months and years on years on end, but the vast majority of the world population, I believe, doesn't have that kind of time or interest towards learning a language. But if a language was super-easy to learn, like Sikwenchu™, then it opens the door for a truly universal language. I'll consider reserving a word that I have in mind as a neutral gender pronoun, unless it conflicts with another part of the language as I continue writing it, and then I can come up with another word for it.

3) The purpose of the trademark to be able to create a brand, no different than any other business brand. I'm not trying to control the language itself, except to keep it from being morphed into something that it's not intended to be. I found that some key reasons that languages are so difficult to learn is because of the way in way languages evolve, change, adopt slang characteristics, etc., and before long, or at least over the course of decades and centuries, the language evolves into something entirely different, which then makes it harder to learn, you know, like 5 - 10 years to realistically learn to speak most languages really well.
English is a great example, with pronunciation. The words "could", "shout", "through" and "trouble" all have an "ou" vowel combination, yet they are all pronounced differently. No wonder foreigners struggle so much in learning English.

Yes, for now, the language is protected by a company trademark, but that doesn't mean you can't speak it, read it, converse with friends. But if you want to also participate in making money with it as well, passing the Sikwenchu™ proficiency tests is a requirement. It's kind of like a dedicated Berlitz school, which I'm sure is well protected by trademarks, because they have their own method of teaching languages. In my case, I have a specific method of teaching a specific language, ensuring that everyone is one the same page when learning it, otherwise you get newbies who might learn a few things and then unintentionally start teaching it incorrectly if they're not well trained in the language. A professional dance school can teach ballet, but they protect their trademarks and teaching methods, even though they're just teaching dance.

It also means that for ambitious individuals who also want to try and succeed financially, they can also join the party by learning the language and passing the required tests for various levels of proficiency with Sikwenchu™. That could be for monetizing the videos on YouTube, or even opening a language school somewhere if successfully passing the more advanced tests. I will also be offering some form of affiliate program (no details yet), at different proficiency levels, so that material that I publish, or approve for publishing on my SikwenchuPress.com web site, will allow others to make money as well!

Imagine if you were the first owner of a Berlitz school in a big city around the world. It's not just money possibilities for me here. Plus, without trying to make a business out of it, there's no way I can come up with the $5,000 per language that I estimate it will cost to translate just the first two Sikwenchu™ books into at least 20 other languages. I don't have a spare 100 grand lying around. So it requires a business effort to try and create a true universal language that can succeed on a worldwide scale, in a relatively short period of time. It's just like how the world screamed that you can't advertise on the internet before it exploded in popularity. But it was only after the advertising money moved in that the internet really came to life.

4) The best way to learn the grammar is to buy the book! However, if you search "Sikwenchu" on Google, you can find the 6 introductory videos that I have already posted, and there will be plenty more to follow. Links below. But having studied some French and Spanish as well, I learned how complicated it can get just to say basic things. If I wanted to say "I went" in Sikwenchu™, it's just the pronoun "ya", followed by the tense marker "di", which puts the verb "to go" (chu) into the simple past tense - "Ya di chu."
I went - Ya di chu.
I have gone. - Ya vi chu.
I will go. - Ya mi chu.
I want to go. - Ya tai chu.
I wanted to go. - Ya di tai chu.

You went. - Na di chu.
He went. - Ta di chu.
She went. - Sa di chu.
We went. - Yan di chu.
You all went. - Nan di chu.
They went. - Tan/San di chu.

I use as few syllables as possible and keep very consistent patterns throughout the language. Every little detail simply makes it that much easier and quicker to learn.

How about in French...
Je suis alle
Tu es alle
Il est alle
Nous sommes alle
Vous etes alle
Ils/Elles sont alle

And then you have to know all the intermediate forms for every type of tense. From a logic perspective only, the English and European languages are very complicated; almost as if the beauty of romance languages let the beautiful artistry interfere with the practical side of learning a language. If you're a native speaker, it's no big deal and even nice to have your own language. It's one reason why I continue to study French, Spanish, Japanese and Chinese - because I like all languages. Sikwenchu™ was simply designed to give everyone a common, practical, logical language in which to be able to speak, so we all communicate with each other.

Bottom, there is potentially a boatload of money for the early birds and ambitious individuals who get involved in learning Sikwenchu™, and passing the upcoming proficiency tests starting sometime in the spring. Just think of how much money a translation company stands to benefit if the language succeeds. Or, what if you become an early certified instructor and are pulling in thousands of views per video when posting on YouTube? The sky is the limit. There are tons of fast food franchisees who make a lot of money off the brand of the fast food restaurant. It's not just the people at the top who succeed. How about the people who pay money to get their Network Specialist certifications in say Windows or Unix, etc. They can make a boatload of money off the main company's brand.

Thanks again for the feedback. Please help get the word out. It truly is a breakthrough language. It's kinda like when you know you have finally solved a huge math equation or when you step up to the plate and hit that home run. You know you hit that home run the second you hit it. Sikwenchu™ sets the stage for millions of us to quickly learn a common universal language. Thanks kindly again for the feedback.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SO1Jjs5luXE&t=328s

https://www.amazon.com/dp/0578422050

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by k1234567890y » 24 Dec 2018 20:32

how much vocabulary does Sikwenchu have in total?
...

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by Frislander » 24 Dec 2018 20:53

shukudai wrote:
24 Dec 2018 16:38
Sikwenchu™ means "Sequence Language". "Sikwen" means "Sequence" and "chu" is the verb meaning "to go", which is a play on words as the Japanese language appends "go" onto some country names, turning it from the country name into the language. (Nihon and Nihongo).
Well, this is kinda funny, but also flagrantly unnaturalistic and superfluous: you do know that the the Japanese "go" here isn't a verb meaning "to go" right? It's completely unjustifiable within the context of the language itself, instead being based on a bilingual pun in the English translation!
It's the categorization of a sequence of patterns, sounds, procedures, events, stories and many other methods, that get encoded into the words to make it far easier to memorize and retain a large vocabulary.
But then you go and through spanners into the works by using the word for "to go" as a suffix deriving languages from the names of countries based on a random Japanese-English interlingual pun!
After having studied some Chinese, which only has "ta" for a male/female pronoun, I always found it confusing to determine who someone was talking about in a group situation, unless it was in writing, as it is distinguished that way in Chinese. As such, I chose to use "ta" for "he" and "sa" for "she".
A gender distinction doesn't solve the problem though: what if you have a group of entirely the same gender? And if you're planning on universal communication, the gender-neutral option is far more preferable in order to avoid the many social quandries surrounding sex-based pronouns in English, e.g. non-binary people, gendered generic usage and so on. If you want referent disambiguation, there are far better ways to go about this than gendered pronouns.
By eliminating the gender forms forms in adjectives, nouns, etc., it greatly reduces the amount of work required to learn the language, to the tune of thousands of combinations that one no longer has to try and conquer for rapid recall in a conversation.
Well then why do you feel the need to burden yourself with this system only in pronouns then? Also you haven't specified how inanimates are handled, so until you've created a gender-neutral form will you use just one of the pronouns, both interchangeably, a grammatical gender system just in the pronouns, or something else?
The purpose of the trademark to be able to create a brand, no different than any other business brand.
Treating languages like commercial products just strikes such a wrong note for me,
I'm not trying to control the language itself, except to keep it from being morphed into something that it's not intended to be. I found that some key reasons that languages are so difficult to learn is because of the way in way languages evolve, change, adopt slang characteristics, etc., and before long, or at least over the course of decades and centuries, the language evolves into something entirely different, which then makes it harder to learn, you know, like 5 - 10 years to realistically learn to speak most languages really well.
English is a great example, with pronunciation. The words "could", "shout", "through" and "trouble" all have an "ou" vowel combination, yet they are all pronounced differently. No wonder foreigners struggle so much in learning English.
So essentially you've trademarked the language so you can stop natural processes of historical change (assuming you can even gain a native speakerbase for this thing, which I very much doubt), which no-one in the entire history of the world, not even national governments, has been able to prevent. Good luck with that.
Yes, for now, the language is protected by a company trademark, but that doesn't mean you can't speak it, read it, converse with friends. But if you want to also participate in making money with it as well, passing the Sikwenchu™ proficiency tests is a requirement. It's kind of like a dedicated Berlitz school, which I'm sure is well protected by trademarks, because they have their own method of teaching languages. In my case, I have a specific method of teaching a specific language, ensuring that everyone is one the same page when learning it, otherwise you get newbies who might learn a few things and then unintentionally start teaching it incorrectly if they're not well trained in the language. A professional dance school can teach ballet, but they protect their trademarks and teaching methods, even though they're just teaching dance.

It also means that for ambitious individuals who also want to try and succeed financially, they can also join the party by learning the language and passing the required tests for various levels of proficiency with Sikwenchu™. That could be for monetizing the videos on YouTube, or even opening a language school somewhere if successfully passing the more advanced tests. I will also be offering some form of affiliate program (no details yet), at different proficiency levels, so that material that I publish, or approve for publishing on my SikwenchuPress.com web site, will allow others to make money as well!

Imagine if you were the first owner of a Berlitz school in a big city around the world. It's not just money possibilities for me here. Plus, without trying to make a business out of it, there's no way I can come up with the $5,000 per language that I estimate it will cost to translate just the first two Sikwenchu™ books into at least 20 other languages. I don't have a spare 100 grand lying around. So it requires a business effort to try and create a true universal language that can succeed on a worldwide scale, in a relatively short period of time. It's just like how the world screamed that you can't advertise on the internet before it exploded in popularity. But it was only after the advertising money moved in that the internet really came to life.
OK, so clearly you want to make money off of this language which... idk man, how are you going to capture the public imagination in a way that literally thousands of other enterprising auxlangers like you have failed, particularly considering the monetary barrier to entry. And how is this auxlang supposed to make you or anyone else money? I guess you're making your money from teaching the language to others, but that doesn't mean people are going to bite and pay to learn it.

I think the problem here is you're coming here like a businessman trying to pitch an auxlang to a community of artlangers who get annoyed at academic journals behind a paywall. We're not your target market (if your auxlang even has a target market).

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by Salmoneus » 25 Dec 2018 00:06

shukudai wrote:
24 Dec 2018 16:38
The design of Sikwenchu™ has roots in Chinese, Japanese, French and Spanish, from a grammatical perspective.
Quick note: this sentence is nonsense, and, like several other of your sentences, is kind of a red flag that you don't really know what you're talking about, from a linguistic perspective. Which is fair enough, most of us here don't have PhDs - there's a continuum of understanding. But given that your pitch here is that you're Guy #7,042 to post, almost word for word, exactly the same claims about your language, something like 'knowing what you're talking about' could be a real salespoint, distinguishing you from your thousands of competitors. Instead... you kind of seem exactly like all the others, only with some unregistered trademarks.

I know, of course, that you won't accept that you haven't magically "solved" all the "problems" that the rest of you haven't been able to solve, and you won't accept that your "solutions" are more or less the same as the solutions you (plural) always offer. I know this, because we have this conversation every couple of months, and you (plural) never accept it. But I don't know, maybe after you make your three-to-eight replies on this forum and then disappear forever, as you (plural) do every couple of months, maybe you'll reflect on this...
As such, I chose to use "ta" for "he" and "sa" for "she". By eliminating the gender forms forms in adjectives, nouns, etc., it greatly reduces the amount of work required to learn the language
Of course, just like maybe 75% of you (plural) do. Because wow, what a coincidence: all the distinctions that are natural for English speakers turn out to be essential to efficient and non-confusing conversation, whereas all the distinctions that are not natural for English speakers, oh, they can be swept away because they're inefficient and confusing. It's like a little miracle of happy circumstance!


Yes, for now, the language is protected by a company trademark, but that doesn't mean you can't speak it, read it, converse with friends.
OK, let's get serious now, because this unregistered trademark business is a little different from usual. Let's start with: no, the language is not protected by a company trademark. What trademarks protect are companies. All that even a registered trademark can do is keep people from forming their own company with the same name or distinguishing marketing features as you. An unregistered trademark, btw, isn't going to intimidate anybody, because its enforceability is extremely limited. [It's also a meaningless claim, incidentally, unless you actually are doing business - it's not like a patent, where you can have your invention protected long before you actually do business with it].
But if you want to also participate in making money with it as well, passing the Sikwenchu™ proficiency tests is a requirement.
No, it isn't - we can all teach people Sikwenchu if we want, with whatever grammar and vocabulary we want to invent. You can't trademark your company's product - a company selling apples, for example, cannot trademark the appearance of an apple or the word 'apple'. So if Sikwenchu is just the name of the language you're teaching, that means you can't use it as an exclusive trademark. Now, you can copyright products. But the general consensus, albeit not conclusively demonstrated in court so far as I'm aware, is that languages are not copyrightable - a language is a set of ideas or processes, not a tangible expression of those ideas. There might be a case for seeking a patent for a language, since patents cover ideas, but I doubt a language would be ruled patentable - it would be hard to demonstrate that any particular lexical choice had a clear utility, for example, and if words are borrowed from natlangs then they are not novel either. So it's unlikely that any sort of intellectual property law can be applied to a language.
It's kind of like a dedicated Berlitz school, which I'm sure is well protected by trademarks, because they have their own method of teaching languages.
You can trademark the term "Berlitz Method", but you cannot actually trademark, copyright or patent the Berlitz method. [actually, I'm not even certain you can trademark even the term - Berlitz have trademarked various graphical representations of the term, which may suggest that they can't trademark the words themselves?] - you certainly can't trademark the languages you teach with the Berlitz method!
In my case, I have a specific method of teaching a specific language, ensuring that everyone is one the same page when learning it, otherwise you get newbies who might learn a few things and then unintentionally start teaching it incorrectly if they're not well trained in the language.
You cannot prevent this legally. Indeed, whatever claims you might have to be able to prevent people from teaching a language correctly, they disappear when they're teaching it incorrectly - by definition, if what they teach is 'incorrect', then they're not copying you!
A professional dance school can teach ballet, but they protect their trademarks and teaching methods, even though they're just teaching dance.
They can trademark the name of their school; they can copyright any specific textbooks. They may be able to patent some particular invention related to teaching. But they can't in general protect their teaching methods. They certainly can't protect the dances that they teach.

It also means that for ambitious individuals who also want to try and succeed financially, they can also join the party by learning the language and passing the required tests for various levels of proficiency with Sikwenchu™. That could be for monetizing the videos on YouTube, or even opening a language school somewhere if successfully passing the more advanced tests. I will also be offering some form of affiliate program (no details yet), at different proficiency levels, so that material that I publish, or approve for publishing on my SikwenchuPress.com web site, will allow others to make money as well!

Bottom, there is potentially a boatload of money for the early birds and ambitious individuals who get involved in learning Sikwenchu™, and passing the upcoming proficiency tests starting sometime in the spring. Just think of how much money a translation company stands to benefit if the language succeeds. Or, what if you become an early certified instructor and are pulling in thousands of views per video when posting on YouTube? The sky is the limit. There are tons of fast food franchisees who make a lot of money off the brand of the fast food restaurant. It's not just the people at the top who succeed. How about the people who pay money to get their Network Specialist certifications in say Windows or Unix, etc. They can make a boatload of money off the main company's brand.

Thanks again for the feedback. Please help get the word out. It truly is a breakthrough language.[/quote]

OK, so now you show your true colours - this is what's known as a pyramid scheme. It's kind of disgusting. What's more, while pyramid selling schemes can navigated loopholes in the laws of specific jurisdictions, you should probably be mindful that many jurisdictions have a whole bunch of laws against this sort of thing that you'll have to be very careful to avoid if you don't want to risk prosecution. Just a friendly tip.


More generally, to explain Frislander's comment that we may not really be your target audience... it kind of feels like you've turned up at a conference on feminism and announced that you're selling some prostitutes. It may not be illegal, and probably some people here would defend your right to do it, but it's kind of... not really reading the room.

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by shukudai » 25 Dec 2018 00:55

Correct, this is not my target market. That's why I was inquiring in my first message whether there was any interest in the language. About me taking the business route, that's the necessary evil required to make a language go universal. I learned a long time ago that successful brands don't succeed by giving products away. It was like my point with the internet - 30 years ago it could barely flourish and had no real value. Everybody was screaming that business would ruin it. It was only when big capital came along that the internet thrived.

Perhaps you know of another constructed language that has been able to achieve achieve any great success. Even Esperanto with its successes still supposedly has only 200,000 to 2,000,000 users, over the course of 100+ years in existence. Obviously there needs to be another approach to make a true universal language work, and business in the answer. English has made huge inroads, with perhaps 1 billion people worldwide being able to speak it, and a boatload of businesses and individuals make a lot money from it by teaching courses and publishing books. Universities make money off of it as well. That's how it becomes successful - lots of people become motivated because they can be involved with what they like and make money off of it. Money drives the world.

I mean I guess I could just go on dreaming of a constructed language that will automatically be adopted by the world, but that's not reality. That's dreaming. I wonder why it is most constructed languages just languish, never able to achieve any massive success. Can you imagine if Microsoft just gave away all it's software, or if Apple gave away all their iPhones, or Verizon just gave away all their phone services for free. No chance would those businesses thrive because they can't afford to just give away things for free and then you wouldn't have those cool products. You wouldn't have cars, televisions, computers, the internet, your smart phone. The greatest products come from business. Even the best non-profits organizations are driven by money. Maybe you don't like the oil companies, which provide the fuel so you can keep your kids warm at night. I guess you prefer a wood stove and an outhouse?

Maybe Starbucks is bad for selling coffee. Maybe grocery stores are bad for selling groceries. Maybe doctors are bad for charging to fix you up. Maybe we shouldn't pay the military forces to protect us. If you want to live in Utopia, good luck finding it. Maybe you should go to work every day and not get paid. That's it, dreamland.

Business wise, I have a publishing company in Colorado the owns the registered Sikwenchu™ trademark and I sell copies of a book online through the publishing company. I guess that means that everyone who publishes on Amazon must be operating a pyramid scheme as well?

If this forum is all about just dreaming of the ideal language-to-be that never goes anywhere beyond the forum, then great, if that's what you want to do. I was just inquiring if there was any interest in the language. I guess I'll wait to see what other people say as well to see if it's just a couple of sore opinions or if that's the consensus of the forum. Either way it's fine with me. I'm just exploring to find out, no big deal. Good or back feedback is fine with me. In any case, I'll be full speed ahead with my targeted market who does very much like much they've learned about the language. And if you never the read the book, I'll guess you'll just never know if it's good or not, and your opinions will be based purely on imagination, not the merits of the language itself. Pure guessing, nothing else.

I've never been on this forum as well, as any other person, so you're off base on that. At least I'm getting feedback which is what I was looking for, so thanks for that.

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by sangi39 » 25 Dec 2018 02:01

I'm pretty much with Sal and Frislander on this one. Attempting to create an auxlang is all well and good, but (setting aside the "trademark" issue) the idea of having people pay to learn it seems particularly counter-intuitive. Yes, of course, you can pay to be taught something, but generally speaking the knowledge itself isn't sat behind a paywall, what you're paying for instead is the teaching.

As for English doing as well as it is, consider also the several hundred years of English being the language of legislation, administration and trade for a fairly large empire, and continues to be the main language in use in what is effectively the world's only current superpower. English didn't just go from being some offshoot Germanic language spoken by a few hundred-thousand people on an island off the coast of a continent-sized peninsula to a near-global Lingua Franca in a few decades because us British were good at trade. No, we went out, took English with us, nicked a metric buttload of land and hung around until the natives gave in and learnt it before agreeing to give it back after a century or two. French, Spanish and Portuguese did basically the same thing, and so did Latin, which is why the Romance languages even exist outside of Italy at all.

It wasn't trade, and it wasn't business in the way you imagine it that facilitated it, but going in and bulldozing our way across the globe, and enforcing English on anyone we thought had a nice patch of land (I will admit to an amount of hyperbole there, I suppose).



Now, as for auxlangs in general, well, I'd be surprised if any of them manage to do well because, quite simply, why would anyone want to bother? As far as facilitating communication goes, there are a handful of languages that are much better for that. Going by the most recent figures I can find, English has 1.1 billion speakers (native and non-native) and is an official in 67 countries, and Spanish has around 500 million speakers, and an official language in 20 countries. So that's around 1.6 billion people you can speak to across 87 countries (of the approximately 193 + 2 countries in the world, so a little under half of them). Throw in Mandarin and you're closing in on being able to communicate with close to half the people in the world.

Auxlangs, as a result of usually having just a single creator, start with just a single speaker in one very specific location, and with very limited resources. Consider the number of books, videos, tapes, CDs, schools that already enable the study of English, Spanish and Mandarin across the world, and the chances for advancements in careers and opportunities for more fulfilling journeys they can give you.

Now, compare that to, say, wanting to learn Tibetan, which has about 1 million speakers and a not-inconsiderable amount of resources regarding it. Could give you a nice chance at learning a new language, but generally speaking it'll only ever be useful in, well, Tibet, unless you have a chance encounter with a member of the Tibetan diaspora. And that's with 1 million speakers.

I'm not saying it's impossible, but Esperanto, which is usually considered to be the most widely spoken conlang, has fewer speakers than the 40 most widely spoken languages in Europe, and doesn't even crack into the top 100 most widely (natively) spoken languages in the world (and outside of the top 10, the vast majority of those have populations found in very pretty much one location, most often within a single country).



So the question is, has Esperanto failed because of poor marketing, or has it lacked something else? Personally, I think Esperanto lacked any practical use when faced with the relative giants of English, Spanish, French and Portuguese, and now Mandarin and Arabic. When faced with choosing a language that will help you speak to more people, do you choose the one that you can find most easily and that already has loads of speakers so you can use it pretty much straight away, or do you choose the one that has a limited pool of resources, barely any speakers, and the hope that it might one day get you understood?

The main draw I can see of Esperanto is purely ideological, since it means you don't have to "give in" to learning the language of a particular country. It's a language that some see as "separate" from the politics of the world, and as far as that goes you may as well just learn Latin.
You can tell the same lie a thousand times,
But it never gets any more true,
So close your eyes once more and once more believe
That they all still believe in you.
Just one time.

shukudai
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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by shukudai » 25 Dec 2018 02:16

k1234567890y wrote:
24 Dec 2018 20:32
how much vocabulary does Sikwenchu have in total?
So far, I've categorized about 700 words between nouns, verbs, adverbs etc. The first volume, Essential Grammar, focuses primarily on grammar limiting the total vocabulary to less than a couple of hundred words, intentionally. It's about 3 to 4 weeks to get comfortable with this volume. The next volume, Survival Phrases, is due out in early January, with the total vocabulary jumping to over 500 frequently used words for getting around as if you were dropped off in a country without knowing the language. More importantly, by the end of the second volume you will have learned the majority of the grammar required to just drop new categorized nouns and other words right into the sentence.

After I release the second volume, I'll begin to add vocabulary to the web site instead of just having pages of it taking up space in another printed volume, which increases publishing costs. The third book will likely be an e-book with all of the categorized vocabulary so you can just hyperlink from the table of contents directly to each page with each word category. Since the verbs are not directly conjugated they drop right into place.

For instance, to say "I wanted to go", is simply "Ya di tai chu.", as I showed in a previous post. Another verb for "to study" (shwe), can simply swap right in - "I wanted to study." is "Ya di tai shwe." Or, "I wanted to see." - "Ya di tai vwa."

Another tense marker, "vi" works as the "has/have" tense, making it just as easy.

I have gone. - Ya vi chu.
I have studied. - Ya vi shwe.
I have seen. - Ya vi vwa.

Indirect verb conjugation already exists in other languages. I just made the patterns much more consistent in Sikwenchu™. The grammar is almost ridiculously simple. That really helps to simplify and accelerate the learning process. That in itself simply isn't enough. I used a similar approach in a language I wrote around 5 years ago, but without a huge vocabulary, the simplified grammar wasn't very useful.

This time around I cracked the code through the categorization and encoding of words which makes a huge difference beyond that, as it allows you to build a very larger vocabulary in a much shorter period of time, instead of trying to memorize thousands of disparate words over the course of many years.

My first target is about 1,200 words by this spring, requiring you to only memorize some 150 - 200 keywords instead. Just knowing the keyword, the encoding method and the categorization approach allows you to quickly and logically arrive at the other words in the group. Subsequent volumes will focus upon the words need for more specific subjects, like math and technology. As the language grows, I'll work with engineers, scientists, etc. to have them assist in the publishing of more technical content. It's a modular approach, but the first two volumes are designed to get you speaking first.

shukudai
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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by shukudai » 25 Dec 2018 03:33

sangi39 wrote:
25 Dec 2018 02:01
I'm pretty much with Sal and Frislander on this one. Attempting to create an auxlang is all well and good, but (setting aside the "trademark" issue) the idea of having people pay to learn it seems particularly counter-intuitive. Yes, of course, you can pay to be taught something, but generally speaking the knowledge itself isn't sat behind a paywall, what you're paying for instead is the teaching.

As for English doing as well as it is, consider also the several hundred years of English being the language of legislation, administration and trade for a fairly large empire, and continues to be the main language in use in what is effectively the world's only current superpower. English didn't just go from being some offshoot Germanic language spoken by a few hundred-thousand people on an island off the coast of a continent-sized peninsula to a near-global Lingua Franca in a few decades because us British were good at trade. No, we went out, took English with us, nicked a metric buttload of land and hung around until the natives gave in and learnt it before agreeing to give it back after a century or two. French, Spanish and Portuguese did basically the same thing, and so did Latin, which is why the Romance languages even exist outside of Italy at all.

It wasn't trade, and it wasn't business in the way you imagine it that facilitated it, but going in and bulldozing our way across the globe, and enforcing English on anyone we thought had a nice patch of land (I will admit to an amount of hyperbole there, I suppose).



Now, as for auxlangs in general, well, I'd be surprised if any of them manage to do well because, quite simply, why would anyone want to bother? As far as facilitating communication goes, there are a handful of languages that are much better for that. Going by the most recent figures I can find, English has 1.1 billion speakers (native and non-native) and is an official in 67 countries, and Spanish has around 500 million speakers, and an official language in 20 countries. So that's around 1.6 billion people you can speak to across 87 countries (of the approximately 193 + 2 countries in the world, so a little under half of them). Throw in Mandarin and you're closing in on being able to communicate with close to half the people in the world.

Auxlangs, as a result of usually having just a single creator, start with just a single speaker in one very specific location, and with very limited resources. Consider the number of books, videos, tapes, CDs, schools that already enable the study of English, Spanish and Mandarin across the world, and the chances for advancements in careers and opportunities for more fulfilling journeys they can give you.

Now, compare that to, say, wanting to learn Tibetan, which has about 1 million speakers and a not-inconsiderable amount of resources regarding it. Could give you a nice chance at learning a new language, but generally speaking it'll only ever be useful in, well, Tibet, unless you have a chance encounter with a member of the Tibetan diaspora. And that's with 1 million speakers.

I'm not saying it's impossible, but Esperanto, which is usually considered to be the most widely spoken conlang, has fewer speakers than the 40 most widely spoken languages in Europe, and doesn't even crack into the top 100 most widely (natively) spoken languages in the world (and outside of the top 10, the vast majority of those have populations found in very pretty much one location, most often within a single country).



So the question is, has Esperanto failed because of poor marketing, or has it lacked something else? Personally, I think Esperanto lacked any practical use when faced with the relative giants of English, Spanish, French and Portuguese, and now Mandarin and Arabic. When faced with choosing a language that will help you speak to more people, do you choose the one that you can find most easily and that already has loads of speakers so you can use it pretty much straight away, or do you choose the one that has a limited pool of resources, barely any speakers, and the hope that it might one day get you understood?

The main draw I can see of Esperanto is purely ideological, since it means you don't have to "give in" to learning the language of a particular country. It's a language that some see as "separate" from the politics of the world, and as far as that goes you may as well just learn Latin.

I like your point about the way English made inroads around the world. It might not have been the nicest way to go about doing things but sadly, my observation in life is that might ends up being right, though it's not very nice. I guess that's how English prevailed.

Paying for a learning a language is one of practicality from my perspective, nothing else. My goal was not to create a language to make money; my goal was to create a language that was so easy to learn that people from around the world could quickly start to communicate with each other. Typically students from around the world can study English for at least 6 years in school if it's not their native tongue. But then most of them need immersion for 2 to 3 years before they can really speak it. And since many people never end up being immersed, it seems like a huge waste of study energy that could be put to better use.

That's why I created Sikwenchu™ to be super-easy to learn for everyone. I intend to publish at least a half dozen books in 2019 to make sure there is adequate material to help English speakers get started, which covers maybe 20% of the world population who should be able to at least read the books, even if they can't speak it. But then the problem I envisioned was that in order for the other 80% of the world population to learn the language, I would have to have it translated into dozens of other languages, to the tune of about $100,000 is my guess.

By publishing books, I hope to be able to generate enough revenue to host free tutorials at local cafes and pay for for the translation of the books into a couple of other language, likely Chinese first, simply because of the size of the population. Spanish, French, Hindi and others would follow, but without any money, there's no way to reach the other 6 billion+ individuals in the world that I know of. I certainly can't afford to pay a printer millions of dollars to print up millions of copies. Nor do I have the money to advertise the product to billions of people around the world as advertising costs are astronomical.

Considering auxiliary languages don't have the appeal of a Hollywood movie or a first-person shooter video game, I opted to try the publishing approach. In a tutoring environment, I intend to bring several dozen people up to a conversant level within a matter of months, enlisting their help to teach friends of theirs who struggle to speak English. I believe that by the springtime I can have many dozens of individuals from many countries already speaking with each other in Sikwenchu™, even though they would not have been able to speak with each other prior to that. That's the approach that I plan to take with my marketing.

Plus, I also learned decades ago that a lot of people do not remain committed to a project unless they have their own money on the line. If they don't pay for a course, there is not extra incentive to go to a class. But if someone dropped $300 to take a painting course, they'll likely show up during the duration of the course so they get their money's worth.

I'm also driven by the frustration of not being able to speak with many foreigners that I've met over the years, and not being able to establish any real communication with them because of a language barrier. I tried the brute force approach, studying French, Spanish, Japanese and Chinese, but the sheer volume of vocabulary necessary to learn is simply overwhelming. There needed to be a drastically simpler approach. So that's simply what I did. I used my artistic and computer programming skills to methodically design a new language, over the course of 5 years, so that everyone could learn it quickly and easily.

I looked carefully at the details of many languages to simplify in any way possible. Even just limiting many words to single syllables made a huge difference as your brain simple has less to remember. I suspect you know how complicated it can get in some languages just to express simple thoughts.

Starting later this week, I'll reach out to earlier prospects and will advertise to teach dozens of foreign bilingual students in a cafe environment. Of course they'll all get free copies of the book and free tutoring for their efforts. If the weather permits, I'll tutor as many people as possible up to 7 days a week. These individuals will be on the fast track to become certified to teach the language, just like a college professor, or a yoga instructor, might have their own certification to teach a specific subject or style. They'll also be the first ones who will have the first crack to join the affiliate program that I will develop on the web site, or have the first chance to publish their own material as they'll have a leg up. Early bird gets the worm.

I'm simply giving everyone a choice to join the party if they want. I want to be able to speak with people from all corners of the worlds, or at least in the local cafe if they're visiting from any part of the world. Plus I hope to solve a much more important problem - the issue of first generation immigrants who raise children in their new country and whose children, only learning English, are unable to speak with their own relatives who got left behind in their native country. Generations pass and these individuals are never able to communicate with their own grandparents, cousins, aunts an uncles, simple because it's too difficult or expensive for each party to learn English as a second language.

As far as Esperanto is concerned, it was a great attempt, with many people speaking it. But while the language might be relatively easy to learn for European members, it's certainly doesn't must look difficult to many other populations. And it doesn't conquer the massive vocabulary issue that I have addressed in my language, allowing it to be learned much quicker.

Esperanto has made a great attempt, but it needs to be radically simpler to be adopted by the majority of the people in the world. Languages are simply tough to learn and most people work all day, want to spend time with their family and watch television or just have fun during their spare time. So I made Sikwenchu™ super-ultra-simple to learn. That's the real difference. Plus you get to have a huge vocabulary so you can become very expressive with your thoughts. Otherwise you are always wondering what a particular word is and you beat the bush trying to communicate.

Well, I hope there are least a couple of ambitious people on the board who might want to gamble about $25 to study both volumes. But I'm well aware that it's more important for the vast majority of the world population to just spend far more of their hard-earned money on booze, weed, and junk food because they're burned out from working so hard. I can't blame for that as I've seen how hard laborers work in the many states that I've lived. All I can say is I'm going to make a go at with with many publications and many hours of free tutoring in my area. With time, I'll expand it to online sessions as well, but I have to complete several more volumes first. I'm quite tenacious by nature so it's stands a small chance to succeed.

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by DesEsseintes » 25 Dec 2018 04:05

If this forum is all about just dreaming of the ideal language-to-be that never goes anywhere beyond the forum, then great, if that's what you want to do.
This might be a major reason why your ideas are not likely to obtain a favourable reception on this forum.

I apologise in advance if I sound like I’m speaking on behalf of everyone on this forum. I cannot do that, but I’m fairly confident a significant proportion of forum users broadly agree on what I’m about to say.

You see, we don’t believe in an “ideal language-to-be”. We spend a lot of time studying the different languages of the world and the endlessly astonishing variety of ways in which they express ideas. Along with that, I believe, goes a growing awareness that there is no “ideal” way of constructing a language, but rather a smorgasbord of options, which we like to play with and experiment to see how and whether different features work together to form coherent (or not-so-coherent) systems of communication.

Every combination has unique advantages and disadvantages. When creators of auxiliary languages believe they have made a language simpler and more efficient just because they eliminated personal inflections or built up a staggeringly large lexicon based on only 800 lexical roots, they don’t realise that complexity creeps in through other means (details of which have been discussed ad nauseam in other threads), the reason being that human experience is incredibly complex and therefore requires a complex system of communication if it is to be conveyed.

On a personal note, I find few things less attractive than a language advertised for its simplicity and ease of acquisition. Where’s the fun in that? Presented with such a utilitarian language, I would certainly not be looking forward to the delights of discovering nuanced ways of expression that I haven’t come across in the languages I know already, or volumes of literature written by people with mindsets that differ from mine in exhilarating ways. But I suppose your language is meant for a different audience.

I look forward to hearing of your great commercial successes.

shukudai
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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by shukudai » 25 Dec 2018 05:40

DesEsseintes wrote:
25 Dec 2018 04:05
If this forum is all about just dreaming of the ideal language-to-be that never goes anywhere beyond the forum, then great, if that's what you want to do.
This might be a major reason why your ideas are not likely to obtain a favourable reception on this forum.

I apologise in advance if I sound like I’m speaking on behalf of everyone on this forum. I cannot do that, but I’m fairly confident a significant proportion of forum users broadly agree on what I’m about to say.

You see, we don’t believe in an “ideal language-to-be”. We spend a lot of time studying the different languages of the world and the endlessly astonishing variety of ways in which they express ideas. Along with that, I believe, goes a growing awareness that there is no “ideal” way of constructing a language, but rather a smorgasbord of options, which we like to play with and experiment to see how and whether different features work together to form coherent (or not-so-coherent) systems of communication.

Every combination has unique advantages and disadvantages. When creators of auxiliary languages believe they have made a language simpler and more efficient just because they eliminated personal inflections or built up a staggeringly large lexicon based on only 800 lexical roots, they don’t realise that complexity creeps in through other means (details of which have been discussed as nauseam in other threads), the reason being that human experience is incredibly complex and therefore requires a complex system of communication if it is to be conveyed.

On a personal note, I find few things less attractive than a language advertised for its simplicity and ease of acquisition. Where’s the fun in that? Presented with such a utilitarian language, I would certainly not be looking forward to the delights of discovering nuanced ways of expression that I haven’t come across in the languages I know already, or volumes of literature written by people with mindsets that differ from mine in exhilarating ways. But I suppose your language is meant for a different audience.

I look forward to hearing of your great commercial successes.
Yes, my language might be considered to be a little dry. In fact, over the past month I have described it on numerous occasions to feel a little simplistic and kinda dumb, yet very effective for achieving the goal of maximizing the number of people who can quickly learn it. That was the trade-off I decided to make as my goal was to make it as readily available to as many people as possible.

But I do enjoy languages just as much for their unique ways in expressing thoughts. I love sounds and the physiological connection to them. That's why I still study my current 4 languages of choice and I'll study more in the future. I agree, this is likely not the forum for my language, well except that is has a basis in several languages in order to be able to construct it.

For instance, "tai" is from Japanese, "chu" is from "qu" in Chinese, many other words and grammatical forms nearly mirror Chinese as well. I mix and lot of French, Spanish, Chinese, Japanese and English together for the grammar and add a lot of words from other languages as well, trying to keep it familiar to as many people as possible. Yes, I did it for the purpose of making it as simple as possible, not to make it as elegant and beautiful as possible. My approach favors a mass adoption, not a beautiful language that is more difficult to comprehend. I'm trying to open the doors to allow many more people to be able to communicate with each other. That's the goal. Only time will tell if this approach can work.

Your last paragraph makes great sense. Likely the only nuanced ways of expression in my language are those derived from the ways that I discovered in other languages. My language would likely be more appealing to other computer programmers who like logical approaches to solving puzzles. You have provided the feedback that I was looking for. Thank you kindly. I'll move along.

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by Nachtuil » 25 Dec 2018 05:59

DesEsseintes wrote:
25 Dec 2018 04:05
If this forum is all about just dreaming of the ideal language-to-be that never goes anywhere beyond the forum, then great, if that's what you want to do.
This might be a major reason why your ideas are not likely to obtain a favourable reception on this forum.

I apologise in advance if I sound like I’m speaking on behalf of everyone on this forum. I cannot do that, but I’m fairly confident a significant proportion of forum users broadly agree on what I’m about to say.

You see, we don’t believe in an “ideal language-to-be”. We spend a lot of time studying the different languages of the world and the endlessly astonishing variety of ways in which they express ideas. Along with that, I believe, goes a growing awareness that there is no “ideal” way of constructing a language, but rather a smorgasbord of options, which we like to play with and experiment to see how and whether different features work together to form coherent (or not-so-coherent) systems of communication.

Every combination has unique advantages and disadvantages. When creators of auxiliary languages believe they have made a language simpler and more efficient just because they eliminated personal inflections or built up a staggeringly large lexicon based on only 800 lexical roots, they don’t realise that complexity creeps in through other means (details of which have been discussed ad nauseam in other threads), the reason being that human experience is incredibly complex and therefore requires a complex system of communication if it is to be conveyed.

On a personal note, I find few things less attractive than a language advertised for its simplicity and ease of acquisition. Where’s the fun in that? Presented with such a utilitarian language, I would certainly not be looking forward to the delights of discovering nuanced ways of expression that I haven’t come across in the languages I know already, or volumes of literature written by people with mindsets that differ from mine in exhilarating ways. But I suppose your language is meant for a different audience.

I look forward to hearing of your great commercial successes.
I can confirm that this is generally accurate for this forum as far as I can surmise. You're welcome to stick around and develop your own language, create others or take part in collaborate projects.

If your goal is for your language to have as few barriers as possible for people to access and use your language, you may want to put your grammar for it up online for free. It is enough of a barrier already that people would take up learning a language with an exceptionally small or non-existent speaker community as opposed to learning a language that is already used by a large amount of people in the world already as the later, albeit potentially taking longer, will be far more practical. People may still decide to buy the book for reference if they wish though.

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by lsd » 25 Dec 2018 15:17

I am interested in the objectives of Sikwenchu ™...
how do you intend to make the project more attractive culturally and commercially than English...
how do you intend to prevent its propagation (which is strange goal for an auxlang project) and its anarchic mutations...

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by elemtilas » 25 Dec 2018 17:01

Just a note on the legal aspect of your would be auxlang:

I think you might want to get in contact with Sai. He is probably the single most knowledgeable person in the entire universe when it comes to all the legal aspects of language invention.

It's cute (for about one second) that you write a "TM" every time you write your auxlang's name, and it's also great you own a publishing company, but the reality is your language is not copyrightable, the name of your language is not trademarkable, and all of it is likely not patentable.

The Language Creation Society have actually done quite a bit of legal work, with actual lawyers, along these lines. They actually know what they're talking about.

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by shukudai » 25 Dec 2018 17:48

Nachtuil wrote:
25 Dec 2018 05:59
DesEsseintes wrote:
25 Dec 2018 04:05
If this forum is all about just dreaming of the ideal language-to-be that never goes anywhere beyond the forum, then great, if that's what you want to do.
This might be a major reason why your ideas are not likely to obtain a favourable reception on this forum.

I apologise in advance if I sound like I’m speaking on behalf of everyone on this forum. I cannot do that, but I’m fairly confident a significant proportion of forum users broadly agree on what I’m about to say.

You see, we don’t believe in an “ideal language-to-be”. We spend a lot of time studying the different languages of the world and the endlessly astonishing variety of ways in which they express ideas. Along with that, I believe, goes a growing awareness that there is no “ideal” way of constructing a language, but rather a smorgasbord of options, which we like to play with and experiment to see how and whether different features work together to form coherent (or not-so-coherent) systems of communication.

Every combination has unique advantages and disadvantages. When creators of auxiliary languages believe they have made a language simpler and more efficient just because they eliminated personal inflections or built up a staggeringly large lexicon based on only 800 lexical roots, they don’t realise that complexity creeps in through other means (details of which have been discussed ad nauseam in other threads), the reason being that human experience is incredibly complex and therefore requires a complex system of communication if it is to be conveyed.

On a personal note, I find few things less attractive than a language advertised for its simplicity and ease of acquisition. Where’s the fun in that? Presented with such a utilitarian language, I would certainly not be looking forward to the delights of discovering nuanced ways of expression that I haven’t come across in the languages I know already, or volumes of literature written by people with mindsets that differ from mine in exhilarating ways. But I suppose your language is meant for a different audience.

I look forward to hearing of your great commercial successes.
I can confirm that this is generally accurate for this forum as far as I can surmise. You're welcome to stick around and develop your own language, create others or take part in collaborate projects.

If your goal is for your language to have as few barriers as possible for people to access and use your language, you may want to put your grammar for it up online for free. It is enough of a barrier already that people would take up learning a language with an exceptionally small or non-existent speaker community as opposed to learning a language that is already used by a large amount of people in the world already as the later, albeit potentially taking longer, will be far more practical. People may still decide to buy the book for reference if they wish though.
I have already started posting the grammar videos on YouTube. You can search for the language on Google or YouTube to find it. If there are enough views, I'll be motivated to post more videos. I will be teaching the grammar for free to dozens of people at the local cafes and at some point I will also host online chat sessions as well, teaching the language, but I have a limitation on internet speed where I live.

shukudai
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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by shukudai » 25 Dec 2018 17:57

lsd wrote:
25 Dec 2018 15:17
I am interested in the objectives of Sikwenchu ™...
how do you intend to make the project more attractive culturally and commercially than English...
how do you intend to prevent its propagation (which is strange goal for an auxlang project) and its anarchic mutations...
I hoping that the appeal to non-native speakers is simply that the language can be learned quickly. Imagine if someone from China, Japan, Vietnam, India, etc., all just studied for two months and could then have practical conversations with each other after only two month. Though that's not a cultural attraction, that's the type of appeal that I hope generate. Commercially, the objective is that if enough people realize that they can start communicating so quickly and easily that it then might go viral with all the individuals who struggled for years to learn English and were never successful with it.

shukudai
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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by shukudai » 25 Dec 2018 18:08

elemtilas wrote:
25 Dec 2018 17:01
Just a note on the legal aspect of your would be auxlang:

I think you might want to get in contact with Sai. He is probably the single most knowledgeable person in the entire universe when it comes to all the legal aspects of language invention.

It's cute (for about one second) that you write a "TM" every time you write your auxlang's name, and it's also great you own a publishing company, but the reality is your language is not copyrightable, the name of your language is not trademarkable, and all of it is likely not patentable.

The Language Creation Society have actually done quite a bit of legal work, with actual lawyers, along these lines. They actually know what they're talking about.
Thanks kindly. I only post the trademark mark symbol as the company, Sikwenchu™ Press, has the registered trademark for Sikwenchu™. The trademark applies to the publishing company which is the publishing arm of the language. There is no trademark on the language itself. The language is simply a registered work with the Copyright office as is typical for book publications.

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by shukudai » 25 Dec 2018 18:30

In case anybody wants to learn a tidbit more about the Sikwenchu™ language, without buying the book or watching the YouTube videos, here's another piece of the puzzle. You can find this material in the book, plus a boatload more.

Two gals, Yanatasa and Midivili are very good friends, always doing everything together. In reality, their names are just memory jogs to help you remember the pronouns and the tense markers.

I will go. - Ya mi chu.
I went. - Ya di chu.
I have gone. - Ya vi chu.

The tense markers work in conjunction with each other as well. The "have/has" marker (vi), can itself be put into a past tense by use "di".

I had gone. - Ya di vi chu.
I had studied. - Ya di vi shwe.
Had you studied? - Na di vi shwe.

I use the pronunciation of country names the same way you would hear them in each respective country, though the spelling can be different.

Will you go to Japan? - Na mi chu Nihon?
I will go to Japan. - Ya mi chu Nihon.

Did you go to Japan? - Na di chu Nihon?
I went to Japan. - Ya di chu Nihon.

Have you gone to Japan? - Na vi chu Nihon?
I have gone to Japan. - Ya vi chu Nihon.

Had you gone to Japan? - Na di vi chu Nihon?
I had gone to Japan. - Ya di vi chu Nihon.

Did she study? - Sa di shwe?
She studied. - Sa di shwe.

Has she studied? - Sa vi shwe?
She has studied. - Sa vi shwe.

Had she studied? - Sa di vi shwe?
She had studied. - Sa di vi shwe.

For negation, I use "bu", from Chinese. Though Chinese also uses "mei you", I predominantly use "bu" for all forms of negation.

I did not go. - Ya bu di chu.
I did not study - Ya bu di shwe.
I did not see. - Ya bu di vwa.

For "why", I use "kwai". ("ai" has the "ai" sound in "hai", in Japanese)

Kwai sa bu di chu Nihon? - Why didn't she go to Japan?
Kwai sa bu di shwe? - Why didn't she study?

I covered "tai" (want) before. Also "bik" is for "because" ('i" has a long 'e' sound

Why did she go to Japan? - Kwai sa di chu Nihon?
Because she wanted to go to Japan. - Bik sa di tai chu Nihon.

Why didn't she go to China? - Kwai sa bu di chu Zhong Guo? ("Zh" has a "j" sound and "uo" has the "oa" sound in "oar")
Because she didn't want to go to China. - Bik sa bu di tai chu Zhong Guo.

Salmoneus
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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by Salmoneus » 25 Dec 2018 19:08

shukudai wrote:
25 Dec 2018 18:08
The language is simply a registered work with the Copyright office as is typical for book publications.
No, it isn't. Languages probably aren't copyrightable. What is copyright is the specific text of your book.

And above you talked about having a registered trademark, yet used the 'TM' symbol. 'TM' is for unregistered trademarks, and claiming to have registered a trademark when you haven't is in many contexts illegal, so again, I'd be careful.

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