Proto-Lothopota

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GizmoLangs24
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Proto-Lothopota

Post by GizmoLangs24 » 13 May 2019 02:06

Hello!

This is the the current progress on my Proto Language, Lothopota, that I'm putting up for criticism - as always. Enjoy your reading!

Phonology:
/p b t d k g/ <p b t d k g>
/m n/ <m n>
/f θ s z h/ <f th s z h>
/l j/ <l j>

/a e i o u/ <a e i o u>
/a: e: i: o: u:/ <aa ee ii oo uu>

I am aware that the romanization for the long vowels is distasteful, but I wanted to make it very computer friendly, since I was going to show some friends. I may change it in the future.

Phonotactics:
(C)(C)V(C)

Onset clusters:
(f θ)(l j)
(s)(p t k m n l j)

Intersyllabic clusters - In progress
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Pronouns - subject+possessive:

Ko - I.
Ken - my
Su - you.
Sin - your
Lo - he.
Len - his
Na - she.
Nan - her

Koos - we.
Kom - our
Suus - you all.
Sum - your (plur.)
Loos - they (m)
Lom - their (m)
Naas - they (f)
Nam - their (f)
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Nouns + Articles:
Nouns agree with articles in gender and number.

Masculine nouns end with -o.
Feminine nouns end with -a.
Plurality is indicated with the suffix -ne.
Plurality suffixes are attaches to both nouns and articles.

Lano - man
Tho/tha - definite article

Tho lano - the man
Thone lanone - the men

Nouns are commonly derived from root nouns, usually by suffixing the final syllable of a root noun onto another root noun.

Kala - water
Stogo - path

Kalago - river (lit. Water path)
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Verbs + postpositions:
Verbs (as infinitives) end with -n.
Word order - SOV

Present tense - factual/simple aspect:
(I literally don't know what to call this, simple aspect? If anyone knows what this aspect is, please tell me, I couldn't find a definite name for this.)

Ko. -go
Su. -gath
Lo/na. -ge
Koos. -goo
Suus. -gas
Loos/naas. -gi

Kolan - to eat
Koona - meat
Ni - verb marker

Loos tha koona ni kolagi. - they eat the meat.

Some verbs can be used as postpositions when their ending is removed. (Ex. Lomen - to walk [as postposition - lome - to]). When they are used in this way, they immediately follow the last object that the postposition affects.

Zolen - to go

Thone lanone tho kalago lome ni zolegi. - The men go to the river.

Some verbs can be followed by an infinitive, becoming an auxilliary verb. When this occurs, the verb marker precedes the auxilliary verb.

Getan - to like

Ko koona ni getago kolan. - I like to eat meat.
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Whitewings
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Re: Proto-Lothopota

Post by Whitewings » 13 May 2019 03:41

For the long vowels, perhaps use macrons? They're easily accessed on Macs; I don't know how to get them on Windows.

Porphyrogenitos
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Re: Proto-Lothopota

Post by Porphyrogenitos » 13 May 2019 04:55

I think doubling vowels is a perfectly good orthographic choice for long vowels. It's used in plenty of languages, including Finnish, and historically for the English mid vowels.

Whitewings
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Re: Proto-Lothopota

Post by Whitewings » 13 May 2019 07:35

Except that to modern readers of many languages, including English, double vowels already have values, or are read most obviously as "a-a," not "long a"

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Tuyono
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Re: Proto-Lothopota

Post by Tuyono » 13 May 2019 09:42

I also use double letters for long vowels and don't see a problem with that, it even remineds me to actually pay attention to length.
Whitewings wrote:
13 May 2019 07:35
Except that to modern readers of many languages, including English, double vowels already have values,
But so do many other symblols and letters! You could also worry that English speakers would read final <e> as silent, for example.

However, If you find it ugly or annoying that's its own reason to change it.

As for the language itself , I'm curious whether it's based on real world languages and to what degree. Especially "-a is feminine and -o is masculine" couln't be a coincidence, right? Also, do all infinitives end in -n like in German, or just the ones you showed us?

GizmoLangs24
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Re: Proto-Lothopota

Post by GizmoLangs24 » 13 May 2019 14:06

Tuyono wrote:
13 May 2019 09:42
As for the language itself , I'm curious whether it's based on real world languages and to what degree. Especially "-a is feminine and -o is masculine" couln't be a coincidence, right? Also, do all infinitives end in -n like in German, or just the ones you showed us?
I did include some similarities to spanish and german in Lothopota, but I tried to keep most of the grammar and roots different from other languages. The verbs do end in -n, but conjugate differently, having you remove just the -n as opposed to -en in most german verbs. Later evolution may also result in different verb endings (kinda like spanish now that I think about it).

GizmoLangs24
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Re: Proto-Lothopota

Post by GizmoLangs24 » 14 May 2019 01:00

Vocab:

Kala - water
Fluta - food
Kalago - river
Ozata - forest

Tenan - to drink
Thoosan - to sit (as postposition - to)
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Conjunctions:

Conjunctions are used to string together sentences or to link nouns or verbs. (Ie. He and she, eat and drink). Some conjunctions have two different forms depending on their role.

A - and (nouns and verbs)
Aka - and (sentences)
U - or (nouns and verbs)
Uso - or (sentences)
Tosu - but
Sato - because
Kelo - so

Ko a lo tho kalago thoosa ni kolagoo.
"He and I eat by the river."

Ko koona kolago aka kala ni tenago.
"I eat meat and drink water."

Ko u na tha ozata lome ni zolegoo.
"Either I or she go to the forest."
This example here can express things like possibility (future) or doubt (past). (Ie. Either I or she will go - possibility | Either I or she went - doubt).
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Negation:

Verbs can be negated using the negation prefix ma-.

Ko tha ozata ni mazolego.
"I do not go to the forest."

Ko ni mathoosago.
"I do not sit."
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Numbers:

Lon - 1
Ju - 2
Das - 3
Nok - 4
Goo - 5
Zan - 6
Let - 7
Ton - 8
Kin - 9
Thuu - 10
Thuulon - 11
Thuuju - 12
Thuudas - 13
Juthuu - 20
Juthuulon - 21
Juthuuju - 22
Juthuudas - 23
Kapo - 100
Kapojuthuulon - 121
Letkaponokthuugoo - 745
Seta - 1000

Numbers can be places in between articles and nouns to specify exact number. (Ie. Thone goo lanone - the 5 men.)
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