Chébǒtlląñ

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Shemtov
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Chébǒtlląñ

Post by Shemtov » 05 Jun 2019 02:52

Chébǒtlląñ /t͡ʃɪ́bʊ̌t͡ɬˠɐ̃/ is a language spoken by c. 700 Pygmies in the Boumba-et-Ngoko department of Cameroon. It is an isolate, but is theorized to be the last survivor of the ancestral language(s) of the Pygmies.

Phonology:
/m n/ <m n>
/p b t d t͡ʃ d͡ʒ k / <p b t d ch j k>
/t͡s t͡ɬ t͡ɬʲ t͡ɬˠ/ <c thl tly tll>
/f s ɬ ɬʲ ɬˠ ʃ h/ <f s hl hly hll sh h>
/l lʲ ɫ/ <l ly ll>
/w j/ <w y>
/ʘ ǃ ǁ ǂ/ <ʘ ǃ ǁ ǂ>

/i ɪ u ʊ a ɐ/ <i e u o a ą>
/ĩ ɪ̃ ũ ʊ̃ ã ɐ̃/ <iñ eñ uñ oñ añ ąñ>

/V V́ V̀ V̌ V̂/ <V V́ V̀ V̌ V̂>

Phonotactics:
(C)V
The language has tense/lax VH.

Verbs:
The verb is templatic, the first thing being the subject marker:
1P sing: NI
1P plr: NÛ
2P: TÀ
3P: The noun class marker of the subject

Then comes the tenses. There are three tenses:
Distant past: ǁǍ
Past-Present:HllÌ
Future-present: pUwÁ

The two present tenses have some overlap with the past and future tenses, respectivly. The future-present when used for the present is progressive, while the past-present is habitual.
Nihllìsújâkàñ
"I often laugh"
or
"I laughed"
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien

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WeepingElf
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Re: Chébǒtlląñ

Post by WeepingElf » 05 Jun 2019 16:51

I like this, an interesting phonology, and it has clicks, which concurs with my opinion that before the Bantu expansion, many if not most languages of Africa south of the Equator probably had them. But please tell us what the capital letters in your morphology examples stand for.
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Re: Chébǒtlląñ

Post by DesEsseintes » 05 Jun 2019 18:51

Shemtov wrote:
05 Jun 2019 02:52
/t͡s t͡ɬ t͡ɬʲ t͡ɬˠ/ <c thl tly tll>
/f s ɬ ɬʲ ɬˠ ʃ h/ <f s hl hly hll sh h>
/l lʲ ɫ/ <l ly ll>
Is there any reason not to romanise /t͡ɬ/ simply <tl>? It looks to me as if that would make the romanisation more regular and symmetrical.

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Re: Chébǒtlląñ

Post by Shemtov » 05 Jun 2019 20:29

WeepingElf wrote:
05 Jun 2019 16:51
But please tell us what the capital letters in your morphology examples stand for.
As the language has tense/lax harmony, the capital letters represent that it depends on the root of the word what vowel it takes. So NI means either /ni/ <ni> or /nɪ/ <ne>.
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien

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Re: Chébǒtlląñ

Post by Shemtov » 05 Jun 2019 20:56

DesEsseintes wrote:
05 Jun 2019 18:51
Shemtov wrote:
05 Jun 2019 02:52
/t͡s t͡ɬ t͡ɬʲ t͡ɬˠ/ <c thl tly tll>
/f s ɬ ɬʲ ɬˠ ʃ h/ <f s hl hly hll sh h>
/l lʲ ɫ/ <l ly ll>
Is there any reason not to romanise /t͡ɬ/ simply <tl>? It looks to me as if that would make the romanisation more regular and symmetrical.
I preferred the symmetry of having all the lateral affricates being trigraphs.
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien

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Re: Chébǒtlląñ

Post by Shemtov » 05 Jun 2019 22:03

So far, we have been dealing with the Alethic mood. The language has a number of epistemic moods, which are shown by a different marker for the tense:
Speculative
Distant past: BÀbÂ
Past-Present: ǂÙ
Future-present: ShÚtÂ

Deductive:
Distant past: SÚ
Past-Present: NUWÀ
Future-present: DǍtllÌñ

Assumptive:
Distant past: LlÚǃÙ
Past-Present: SÀñ
Future-present: SǍñtÂ

Dubatative:
Distant past: FI
Past-Present:LÚñ
Future-present: ǁÁǃÁ

Niǁá!ásújâkàñ
"I doubt I will laugh"


Tànuwàsújâkàñ
"You must have laughed"

Tàllú!ùsújâkàñ
"You probably have laughed"
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien

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Re: Chébǒtlląñ

Post by Shemtov » 06 Jun 2019 10:27

Noun-classes seem to be taken from the Bantu languages for the most part.
Class I: Proper names. For verbs they are treated like the noun class they fall in (personal names are Class II, place names are Class VI )
Class II: Humans. Singular AñbÚ plural: BǍñ
Class III. Animals. Singular: Àñ plural: Áñ
Class IV: Plants: Singular: Ǔñ Plural: BÎñ
Class V Abstracts. ChÍ
Class VI: Others. Singular: LÎ Plural: Uñ


Example: Ąñbóbǒtlląñ "A pygmy"
Bą̌ñbǒtlląñ "Pygmies"
Last edited by Shemtov on 14 Jun 2019 01:39, edited 1 time in total.
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien

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Re: Chébǒtlląñ

Post by Shemtov » 08 Jun 2019 01:49

There are two patterns for case: Those for Classes I-III, and those for Classes IV-VI, known as the first and second declensions respectively. Note that there may be some exeptions, especially with proper names dirived from

First Declension:
Nom: -∅
Acc. -tllÚ
Dat-All: shÌyU
Gen-Abl: kǏñ
Instr-Loc: bÀñ
Comit: hUʘU
Priv: ǁÂ

Second Declension:
Nom: -∅
Acc. -ǁUlÁ
Dat-All: ǂÎ
Gen-Abl: hǏñkÁ
Loc: sǏñpÛ
Instr: ʘÀñ
Comit: kUpU
Priv: thlAhllÀ

Bą̌ñfoląbe Ąñbóbǒtlląñhoʘo bą̌ñkoñkotlló chékôląʘąñ Kąmérǒñbą̀ñ bą̌ñnową̀dą̌bą́dą̀
Bą̌ñ-foląbe Ąñ-bóbǒtlląñ-hoʘo bą̌ñ-koñko-tlló ché-kôlą-ʘąñ Kąmérǒñ-bą̀ñ bą̌ñ-nową̀-dą̌bą́dą̀
CLASSII.PLR-Fulani CLASSII.SING-Pygmy-COM CLASSII.PLR-Congo-ACC NOM-loud-INSTR Cameroon-LOC CLASSII.PLR-PSTPRSNT.DEDUCT-speak

"It seems that Fulanis accompanied by a Pygmy spoke to Congolese people with a loud voice in Cameroon"
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien

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Re: Chébǒtlląñ

Post by Shemtov » 11 Jun 2019 08:17

The Nasal Vowels have interesting allophonic properties. Before a stop, they make the stop prenasalized. Before the afrricates, they produce, for example, the sequence //ĩt͡ɬ/ would be realized as [iⁿt.t͡ɬ]. This is why /t͡ʃ d͡ʒ/ are on the stop row: for purposes of nasal allophony, they are stops.
Fricatives and Liquids act like this: the Theoretical words /ãsa/ and /ãlʲa/ would be realized as [as̃.sa] and [al̃ʲ.lʲa]
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien

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Re: Chébǒtlląñ

Post by Shemtov » 12 Jun 2019 07:19

The negative marker is -llÀ after a verb stem and the question marker is -llǍ in the same position.
Between a noun root and the case an augmentative or a diminutive can be added. The augmentative is bÂ, and the dimunitive is tAnÁ for nominatives, and thlÁñ for the marked cases.
Bą̌ñfoląbebą̂ Ąñbóbǒtlląñbą̂hoʘo bą̌ñkoñkothlą́ñtlló chékôląʘąñ Kąmérǒñbą̀ñ bą̌ñnową̀dą̌bą́dą̀llą̂
Bą̌ñ-foląbe-bą̂ Ąñ-bóbǒtlląñ-bą̂-hoʘo bą̌ñ-koñko-thlą́ñ-tlló ché-kôlą-ʘąñ Kąmérǒñ-bą̀ñ bą̌ñ-nową̀-dą̌bą́dą̀-llą̂
CLASSII.PLR-Fulani-aug CLASSII.SING-Pygmy-AUG-COM CLASSII.PLR-Congo-DIM-ACC NOM-loud-INSTR Cameroon-LOC CLASSII.PLR-PSTPRSNT.DEDUCT-speak-INT

"Does it seem that important Fulanis accompanied by an important Pygmy spoke to unimportant Congolese people with a loud voice in Cameroon?"
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien

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