Egloojo

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Omzinesý
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Egloojo

Post by Omzinesý » 05 Jul 2019 20:23

Egllo-oyo is my newest quick project. Egllo is the name of the people and oyo just means 'language'.

The idea for the lang comes from Whitewings' Oraata and massive use of compounding. I have of course tried it many times but I'll do it again.
Verb roots are a closed class of around 30 members. I'm not sure if nouns are incorporated to them or if there are multi-argument clauses with a light verb.
Last edited by Omzinesý on 05 Jul 2019 21:54, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Egloojo

Post by Omzinesý » 05 Jul 2019 20:40

Phonology

Vowels
i ɯ u
e ɘ o
æ ɑ ɒ

<i y u
ê â ô
e a o>


Consonants

p t ʈ k
b d ɖ g
s ʂ
z
bm dn ɖɳ gŋ
m m ɳ ŋ
dl ɖɭ gʟ
l ɭ ʟ
ɟj gw
j w

<p t t. k
b d d. g
s s.
z
bm dn d.n. gn
m n n. nn
dl d.l. gl
l l. ll
gj gw
j w>

Syllable structure
(C)V(K), where K stands for voiceless stops. They are often non-exploded. I'm not sure in which phonetic environment.

Word structure
Noun roots are usually either VCV(K) or CV(K)
Verb roots are usually CV, but verbs have more inflection than nouns.

When two words are combined and two vowels get to contact, some sandhi phenomena will appear.

Stress
Egllooyo has a pitch accent. I'm not sure if words either have the high pitch on one syllable or none, or if a there can be a hight pitched line of syllables.
Stress of nouns usually codes grammatical meanings. Mainly the relation of the compound roots.
Last edited by Omzinesý on 05 Jul 2019 22:39, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Egloojo

Post by Omzinesý » 05 Jul 2019 21:11

Verbs code at least tense and voice.

There is no one way to express negation. Some verbs have a negative counterpart with similar enough semantics. For some verbs only their complements are negated, e.g. "be no X".

All verbs have an agent-oriented version and a patient-oriented form. I think they can be called active and passive voices, respectively, because if they are used in two-argument construction the passive has the same semantics as the active. Alone i.e. without a by-agent, the semantics of the passive may much differ from that of the active. All verbs, copular and adjectival verbs, do not have a passive.

Verbs also have a form that is used in relative clauses and adverbial clauses. It has the same tense and voice markers, so I don't call it nonfinite. I think relative mode is a term good enough.

Meanings of the verbs

Attitude
- like, have an opinion
- dislike, have a negative opinion

Mental activity
- think
- know
- be ignorant

Communication
- express (say, speak)
- perceive (hear, see)

Action
- do (maintain, practice, work)
- make, accomplish, create
- destroy
- be disable to do
- reject doing
- to use (not consume)
- to use all, consume
- not to use
- touch, meet, hit

Movement
- go to
- move about

States
- be (be a member of the group of Xs)
- equal (be the X)
- be located, stand, have
- be located, lie, have

Adjectival verbs
- be light
- be dark
- be big
- be small
- be new/young
- be old
- be good
- be bad
Last edited by Omzinesý on 06 Jul 2019 22:50, edited 1 time in total.

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Omzinesý
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Re: Egloojo

Post by Omzinesý » 05 Jul 2019 23:19

The passive is formed by prestopping the first consonant of the verb root if the consonant is a sonorant or adding a + gemination of the consonant if it is an obstruent.

"ne" means 'have'. Its passive form is "dne" 'lie, be there'.
"ky" means 'use'. Its passive form is "akky" 'be used'.

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Re: Egloojo

Post by Omzinesý » 06 Jul 2019 22:51

The relative mood is formed by changing the vowel of the verb.

so. 'is good'
su. 'which is good, good'

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Re: Egloojo

Post by Reyzadren » 07 Jul 2019 14:20

Omzinesý wrote:
05 Jul 2019 21:11
All verbs have an agent-oriented version and a patient-oriented form. I think they can be called active and passive voices, respectively, because if they are used in two-argument construction the passive has the same semantics as the active. Alone i.e. without a by-agent, the semantics of the passive may much differ from that of the active. All verbs, copular and adjectival verbs, do not have a passive.
> without a by
The only elegant way to use the passive imo. More conlangers should do this in their langs. [+1]
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Omzinesý
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Re: Egloojo

Post by Omzinesý » 07 Jul 2019 20:12

Reyzadren wrote:
07 Jul 2019 14:20
Omzinesý wrote:
05 Jul 2019 21:11
All verbs have an agent-oriented version and a patient-oriented form. I think they can be called active and passive voices, respectively, because if they are used in two-argument construction the passive has the same semantics as the active. Alone i.e. without a by-agent, the semantics of the passive may much differ from that of the active. All verbs, copular and adjectival verbs, do not have a passive.
> without a by
The only elegant way to use the passive imo. More conlangers should do this in their langs. [+1]
What do you mean? Do you mean that the agent cannot be expressed altogether or that the by-agent has the same case as subjects and objects?

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Re: Egloojo

Post by Reyzadren » 07 Jul 2019 23:42

Omzinesý wrote:
07 Jul 2019 20:12
Reyzadren wrote:
07 Jul 2019 14:20
> without a by
The only elegant way to use the passive imo. More conlangers should do this in their langs. [+1]
What do you mean? Do you mean that the agent cannot be expressed altogether or that the by-agent has the same case as subjects and objects?
No, it means I like this feature of your conlang. [:D]
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Re: Egloojo

Post by eldin raigmore » 08 Jul 2019 03:20

I would like the chomeur* agent to be optionally explicit; neither required nor forbidden.

*(chomeur means “demoted to unemployed”. Apparently French linguists can’t just say “fired”.)

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Re: Egloojo

Post by Omzinesý » 09 Jul 2019 20:16

eldin raigmore wrote:
08 Jul 2019 03:20
I would like the chomeur* agent to be optionally explicit; neither required nor forbidden.

*(chomeur means “demoted to unemployed”. Apparently French linguists can’t just say “fired”.)
I think these are rather medio-passives. So the passive meaning appears quite rarely. Usually they are unaccusative intransitives.
But im still not sure if the passive agent should have some preposition.

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