Kšaisnnã

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Shemtov
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Kšaisnnã

Post by Shemtov » 11 Aug 2019 23:00

Kšaisnnã is a language spoken by an isolated tribe in a hill valley in the middle of the Mountains North of Aimdul.

Phonology:
/p p: t t: k k: ʔ / <p pp t tt k kk '>
/p͡s p͡ʃ t͡s t͡ʃ k͡s k͡ʃ/ <ps pš ts tš ks kš>
/s s: ʃ ʃ: h~x/ <s ss š šš h>
/m m: n n:/ <m mm n nn>
/l/ <l>
/w j/ <w y>

/i o a/ <i o a>
/i: o: a:/ <ii oo aa>
/ai au/ <ai au>
/ə̃/ <ã>

Phonotactics:
(C)(C)V(C)

The following clusters can occur:
/pl tl kl tw kw pj tj sm ʃm sn ʃt sp ʃp st ʃt sk ʃk/

The language has distinctive pitch accent, marked by an acute accent.

The Noun has two genders: Animate and Inanimate, usually determined by natural classes. This post will consider animates only, as they have some odd features that do not occur on inanimates.
Nouns are marked for non-definitness. This is done on animates by the suffix -lã, if the root ends in a vowel, and ã if it ends in a consonant. They are marked for plural, and animates distinguish definite plural ((a)kš) from indefinate plural ((o)ps).
Examples:
Twóó'šši "Clouded leopard"
Definate: Twóó'šši
Indefinate: Twóó'ššilã
Definate plural: Twóó'ššikš
Indefinate plural: Twóó'ššips

Iišš "Man; husband"
Definate: Iišš
Indefinate: Iiššã
Definate plural: Iiššakš
Indefinate plural: Iiššops

Nouns can also take possesive prefixes:
No'iišš "My Husband"
Ankiišš "Our husband"
Tiišš "Thy husband"
Kiišš "Your husband"
Hiišš "His/her husband"
Sniišš "Their husband"

Animates can have a genitive form. If the root of the possesor ends in a non-geminate fricative, the fricative is lopped off. If it ends in <ps pš ts tš ks kš ss šš mm nn> this changes to <p p t t k k s š m n>. If the pitch accent is antepenult, it becomes penult.

Example:
Tlã́mkkoo "the woman"

Tlãmkkóó hiišš
"The woman's husband"
Lit. "The woman's, her husband"
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien

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Shemtov
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Re: Kšaisnnã

Post by Shemtov » 16 Aug 2019 01:52

Inanimate nouns are different from Animates, by not distinguishing Definiteness in the plural, and by never having a genitive form. They mark possesion by attaching the Inanimate possession marker Klã(y)- to the possessed noun.

Let's take two words, one vowel final, and one consonant final to show the regular declension of inanimates:
Áíwaa "Pebble"
Definite: Áíaa
Indefinite: Áíwaawau
Plural: Áíwaapšpoo

Aiwáánn "Arrowhead"
Definite: Aiwáánn
indefinite: Aiwáánnau
Plural: Aiwáánnopšpo
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien

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Shemtov
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Re: Kšaisnnã

Post by Shemtov » 16 Aug 2019 22:14

Indicative Intransitive Verbs:
Verbs take the same prefixes that mark possesion to indicate the subject. Some irregulars take the singular markers only, and suffix -(o)mpšã to mark plural subjects.
Regular verb Kšáákkaa"to shout"

Nokšáákkaa "I shout"
Ankakšáákkaa "We shout"
Tiikšáákkaa "Thy shout"
Kiikšáákkaa "You shout"
Hiikšáákkaa"s/he shouts"
Sniikšáákkaa "They shout"

Irregular verb Twíínaa "To sing"
Notwíínaa "I sing"
Notwíínaampšã "We sing"
Tiitwíínaa "Thy sing"
Tiitwíínaampšã "You sing"
Hiitwíínaa "s/he sings"
Hiitwíínaampšã "They sing"

Tense is marked by prefixes. Present is ∅, Future is Kwa'a' and past is Nii, though some irregulars use the reduplicated initial consonant of the person marker followed by ã'.

Aspect comes between the Tense and Person marker. Progressive is loo, Habitual is mmois, termanative is Tlã'aa, and inceptive is tšiiksa

Tlã́mkkookš niitlã'aahiitwíínaampšã
"The women stopped singing"

Nãtšiiksanokšáákkaa
"I started to shout"
Last edited by Shemtov on 19 Aug 2019 11:12, edited 3 times in total.
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien

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eldin raigmore
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Re: Kšaisnnã

Post by eldin raigmore » 17 Aug 2019 02:19

How do they say:
“I scream, you scream, we all scream, for ice cream!”?

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Shemtov
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Re: Kšaisnnã

Post by Shemtov » 19 Aug 2019 01:02

eldin raigmore wrote:
17 Aug 2019 02:19
How do they say:
“I scream, you scream, we all scream, for ice cream!”?
They don't have ice cream.
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien

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eldin raigmore
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Re: Kšaisnnã

Post by eldin raigmore » 19 Aug 2019 05:02

Shemtov wrote:
19 Aug 2019 01:02
They don't have ice cream.
How would they say any one (or more if you feel like it) of the following?
* We don’t have ice cream.
* There is no ice cream.
* What the f*** is “ice cream”?

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eldin raigmore
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Re: Kšaisnnã

Post by eldin raigmore » 19 Aug 2019 05:05

Shemtov wrote:
19 Aug 2019 01:02
They don't have ice cream.
How would they say any one (or any two or all three if you feel like it) of the following?
* We don’t have ice cream.
* There is no ice cream.
* What in the galaxy is “ice cream”?

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Shemtov
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Re: Kšaisnnã

Post by Shemtov » 16 Sep 2019 02:57

Transitive verbs that have an animate object take special prefixes that mark both the subject and object.
Verb 'aihaaw "to love"


I love thee: Mmaa'aihaaw
I love you: Mmaa'aihaawãkš
I love him/her/it: Nnai'aihaaw
I love them: Nnai'aihaawãkš
We love thee: Nuk'aihaaw
We love you: Nuk'aihaawãkš
We love him/her/it: Nnaik'aihaaw
We love them: Nnaik'aihaawãkš
Thy love me: Tai'aihaaw
Thy love us: Tai'aihaawãk
Thy love him/her/it: Tau'aihaaw
Thy love them: Tau'aihaawãkš
You love me: Kai'aihaaw
You love us: Kai'aihaawãk
You love him/her/it: Kau'aihaaw
You love them: Kau'aihaawãkš
He/she/it loves me: Kai'aihaaw
He/she/it loves us: Kai'aihaawãk
He/she/it loves thee: Kau'aihaaw
He/she/it loves you: Kau'aihaawãk
He/she/it loves he/she/it: Akkau'aihaaw
He/she/it loves them: Akkau'aihaawã
They love me: Štai'aihaaw
They love us: Štai'aihaawãk
They love thee: Štau'aihaaw
They love you: Štau'aihaawãk
They love he/she/it: Šnau'aihaaw
They love them: Šnau'aihaawã
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien

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DesEsseintes
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Re: Kšaisnnã

Post by DesEsseintes » 16 Sep 2019 03:25

I like the aesthetic of this language. Your best so far.

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Shemtov
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Re: Kšaisnnã

Post by Shemtov » 16 Sep 2019 20:17

DesEsseintes wrote:
16 Sep 2019 03:25
I like the aesthetic of this language. Your best so far.
It's heavily inspired by Blackfoot, though the phoneme /ə̃/ is due to Cherokee.
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien

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