Lexember 2019

A forum for all topics related to constructed languages
User avatar
Jackk
roman
roman
Posts: 1180
Joined: 04 Aug 2012 13:08
Location: Damborn, Isr Boral

Re: Lexember 2019

Post by Jackk » 26 Dec 2019 23:35

26th Lexember

Boral

neyanç vert /niˈjanʦ vɛʀt/ [nɪˈjanʦ vɛːt] green snowfall
< Phrase attested since at least 1292. First word is synchronically neyar "to snow" plus the gerundive -anç, from Late Latin nivat "it snows" (a regularisation of Classical Latin ningit) and the nominalising suffix -antia, respectively. Second word descended from Latin viridis "green, lively".

Refers to the first snowfall of the year (that is, on or after the first of March), if there is one. Years with a green snowfall are generally considered unlucky, as a symptom of a long and bitter preceding winter.

Y preu osc borallesc dy Grant Morenç a 1519 fis loy ne Damvað a mesur dy neyanç vert.
The first Borlish victim of the 1519 Great Dying was in Damvað during the green snowfall.
/i pʀaw ˈɔx ˌboʀaˈlɛx di ˈgʀant moˈʀɛnʦ a ˈmɪl ʦɪnkˈʦɛnt noˈvɛʦ fɪz ˈlɔj ne damˈvaθ a meˈzɪʀ di niˈjanʦ vɛʀt/
[i pʀaw ˈʔɔx ˌboʀɐˈlɛh dɪ ˌgʀamːʊˈʀɛnʦ ɐ ˈmɪl ʦɪŋˈksɛn nʊˈvɛʦ fɪz ˈlɔj ne dɐɱˈvah a mɪˈzɪː di nɪˈjanʦ vɛːt]
mundum impūrum incolāmus
hamteu n'un mont sug
let us live in a dirty world

User avatar
Dormouse559
moderator
moderator
Posts: 2907
Joined: 10 Nov 2012 20:52
Location: California

Re: Lexember 2019

Post by Dormouse559 » 27 Dec 2019 00:22

VaptuantaDoi wrote:
26 Dec 2019 07:37
stephānī
Hmm, so did Movard change the stress/vowel length on the name? In Latin, Stephanus has antepenultimate stress, and the Romance reflexes all descend from that.

VaptuantaDoi wrote:ninhi comes from L nimiē "excessively," which has no other descendants in Romance languages.
For a while, it had a cognate in Silvish, but I dropped it for something more French. Now ninhi is all alone. [:'(]

User avatar
VaptuantaDoi
sinic
sinic
Posts: 246
Joined: 18 Nov 2019 07:35

Re: Lexember 2019

Post by VaptuantaDoi » 27 Dec 2019 01:43

Dormouse559 wrote:
27 Dec 2019 00:22
VaptuantaDoi wrote:
26 Dec 2019 07:37
stephānī
Hmm, so did Movard change the stress/vowel length on the name? In Latin, Stephanus has antepenultimate stress, and the Romance reflexes all descend from that.
Yes, the stress was changed irregularly early on due to confusion with other names ending in -ānus with penultimate stress (Romānus, Hadriānus, Alānus, Jūstīniānus, Traiānus, Urbānus) and was interpreted as meaning "of Stepha." The same thing happened with Cristovan /kʁiːtoˈvan/ (rather than *cristoevn /kʁiːˈtoːn/) from VL Christóphanus (tbh I made this mistake myself which is why it's in there).
Dormouse559 wrote:
27 Dec 2019 00:22
VaptuantaDoi wrote:ninhi comes from L nimiē "excessively," which has no other descendants in Romance languages.
For a while, it had a cognate in Silvish, but I dropped it for something more French. Now ninhi is all alone. [:'(]
It's only because the cognate in the Eastern Dialect (ninhi /niɲi/) has final /i/ rather than /uː/ in the masculine nominative that precludes an etymology in nimius, which has a few descendants. It could also come from the plural of the first masculine being reanalysed as a singular of the second.



Movard

esçieptiquen /ɛsɛːˈtikɛn/ [əseˑˈtikə̃] adv. Very much, very, extremely; earlier 'excessively,' 'too much.' MM estieptiquente "unbelievably," an adverb regularly formed from estieptique; OM esceptique, attested from 14th century with the meaning "sceptical," later "incredulous," "disbelieving"; borrowed from Mediaeval L scepticus, in turn from AG σκεπτῐκός (skeptĭkós).

es esçieptiquen estupit de çi
/ɛː ɛsɛːˈtikɛn ɛtiˈpi dɛ s/
[ˌeˑ͜ z ͜əseˑˈtikə̃͜ tɨˈpiðə͜ s]
2SG.be very stupid.M.SG of DEM
“You are being very stupid about this.”



Cartaguinhisi

silhviani /siʎviˈani/ adj. Silvish; of Silvia. mn. A Silvish man. Eastern Dialect siglv'anû /siʎβˈanuː/
silhviana /siʎviˈana/ fn. A Silvish woman. ED siglv'ana /siʎˈβana/
silhvianu /siʎviˈanu/ nn. A Silvish person. ED siglv'anu /siʎˈβanu/
sílhvia /ˈsiʎvia/ fn. The country or area of Silvia. ED siglva /ˈsiʎβa/
silhviáe /siʎviˈaɛ/ vb. To speak in Silvish. ED siglv'are /siʎˈβare/
silhviati /siʎviˈati/ adj. In Silvish. ED siglv'atû /siʎˈβatuː/

Standard:
Sílhviaseque
/ˈsiʎviasɛkɛ/
SÍLHVI-A-SE-QUE
speak.silvish-3SG.PRES-REFL-LOC
“Silvish is spoken here.”

Eastern Dialect
Silhv'amûch
/siʎˈβamuːk/
SÍLHV'-AMÛ-CHE
speak.silvish-1PL-LOC
“We speak Silvish here.”

(Demonstrating some of the derivational morphology and pseudo-passives)

shimobaatar
korean
korean
Posts: 11829
Joined: 12 Jul 2013 23:09
Location: PA → IN

Re: Lexember 2019

Post by shimobaatar » 27 Dec 2019 02:23

Y²KS (Day 26):

kijwōkī /ˈkid͡ʒwoːkiː/ (n.) (mythical) beast, monster, (fearsome) critter, (legendary, mythical) creature, cryptid
  • From Proto-AY *ḳā̀yč̣- "to be unfamiliar" + *ğʷàwk- "beast, dangerous animal"
  • A broad class of beings present in traditional folklore
  • Creatures of this type can generally be described as animals that, according to science, do not exist, although some are more bizarre and implausible than others
  • Such creatures are alleged to live underwater, deep in the woods, underground, above the clouds, or high up in the mountains 
  • In many ways, they are simply thought of as animals that most people are unlikely to ever encounter simply because of their typical habitats
  • These creatures are not seen as benevolent or malevolent, as they are not generally thought to be more civilized or intelligent than mundane animals
  • Additionally, individual beasts are thought to be members of larger "species", so to speak, as opposed to unique, solitary entities
  • Nevertheless, these creatures are viewed as somehow fundamentally different from cows, birds, snakes, fish, and other mundane animals
  • According to some, these creatures simply constitute one type of əjmītuyyi ("animal spirit")
  • However, for most believers, an əjmītuyyi is an intelligent spirit with an individual identity that protects a type of mundane animal and/or takes on the form of a slightly anthropomorphic one, whereas a kijwōkī is a member of a "species" of similar creatures all lacking human-level intelligence
  • Still, while not supernaturally powerful beings on par with spirits, let alone gods, these creatures are distinctly paranormal or preternatural
  • Despite the various "species" believed to exist, there are a few qualities generally ascribed to all creatures of this kind, although most of these are commonly described as "rather convenient" by skeptics
  • According to legend, these creatures are said to have some sort of natural instinct to keep themselves hidden from human beings, and although they eat, sleep, and reproduce like mundane animals, they are believed to have a strange relationship with death, either being immortal or not leaving physical bodies behind
  • In addition, visual encounters with such beasts are thought to bring good luck, bad luck, or a rush of some emotion, depending on the type of creature
  • In folktales, it is almost universally portrayed as inadvisable for regular people to attempt to interact with a legendary creature more directly, let alone harm one
Derivations and Related Terms:
Spoiler:
kējī /ˈkeːd͡ʒiː/ (adj.) weird, strange, unfamiliar, unknown, foreign, bizarre
  • From Proto-AY *ḳā̀yč̣- "to be unfamiliar"
  • Typically has negative connotations
  • Can also be used as a noun referring to a person
kēssulī /ˈkeːssuliː/ (n.) weirdness, strangeness, unfamiliarity, foreignness, bizarreness
  • From Proto-AY *ḳā̀yč̣- "to be unfamiliar" + *θùlʸ- "face, quality"
wōkī /ˈwoːkiː/ (n.) beast, carnivore, large animal, dangerous animal
  • From Proto-AY *ğʷàwk- "beast, dangerous animal"
  • Can broadly refer to any fairly large animal, but often implies some level of threat
wamukwōkī /waˈmukwoːkiː/ (n.) a cave-dwelling mythical creature
  • From Proto-AY *ğʷámik- "hollow, empty, cave" + *ğʷàwk- "beast, dangerous animal"
  • Said to live in caves in heavily forested areas
  • Believed to be either omnivorous or carnivorous, and often described as lumbering creatures covered in brown fur
  • Those who encounter these beasts may become violent and angry afterwards
  • This is sometimes used to explain why seemingly normal people suddenly commit violent crimes
  • There is no historical record of bears inhabiting the archipelago where the Abil-Yaunite languages are spoken
  • However, some have speculated that this legend represents a distant cultural memory, so to speak
  • According to this theory, there was at least some kind of bear-like creature indigenous to the islands in prehistoric times, but it went extinct long enough ago for stories of it to be regarded as fantasy by the beginning of the historical period
  • In any case, after becoming aware of the rest of the world and learning that bears exist, the speakers of most modern Abil-Yaunite languages have chosen to use the name of this creature to refer to the real animal
jēwwafirgēlə /ˈd͡ʒeːwwafirgeːlə/ (n.) lake serpent, lake monster
  • From Old Abil gèvwaβiřelɨ "aquatic snake, lake monster", from Proto-AY *gʷìwla- "lake" + *bìˤ- "snake"
  • Introduced to Yaunite folklore by Abil merchants, the name for this creature is derived from the regular Old Abil word for a snake that lives in fresh water
  • These serpents are longer than the average rowboat, but no more than two or three meters in length, and very light blue or white in color
  • They are not believed to attack humans, but are still seen as somewhat unlucky, due to their association with storms and strong winds
dūlbiˤī /ˈduːlbiʕiː/ (n.) freshwater aquatic snake
  • From Proto-AY *gʷìwla- "lake" + *bìˤ- "snake"
  • The word for the mundane equivalent of a jēwwafirgēlə
  • Ultimately identical in etymology to the name of the mythical creature, but inherited directly from Proto-AY rather than borrowed from Old Abil
jafətkarnī /d͡ʒaˈfətkarniː/ (n.) a subterranean mythical creature with heads for legs
  • From Proto-AY *ḳáṗud- "above, head" + *kàrʸn- "below, leg"
  • This creature is described as tan in color and roughly the size of a domestic dog
  • Its body resembles that of some kind of rodent, but with no head
  • It also has no feet, but its legs serve as the necks for four human heads
  • The heads have short, dark hair and all share the same generic facial features
  • The heads on its front legs face forward and those on its hind legs face backwards
  • The heads do not speak, as the creature does not possess human intelligence, but are able to see, hear, smell, eat, and drink
  • These creatures are said to live in underground tunnels and cave systems
  • They are imagined to walk on the ceilings of these tunnels, somehow using the hair on their head-legs to prevent themselves from falling
  • Encounters with these creatures are said to be very disorienting, but not necessarily harmful, according to miners
  • The beast's name is a play on the word for "cephalopod", with the two elements of the compound reversed: "leg-headed" for type of animal that appears to have legs coming from its head vs. "head-legged" for a mythical beast with heads for legs
kirinjafudī /kiˈrind͡ʒafudiː/ (n.) cephalopod, octopus, squid, cuttlefish
  • From Proto-AY *kàrʸn- "below, leg" + *ḳáṗud- "above, head"
  • Technically a generic term for any cephalopod, but the default referent tends to be an octopus
Example:

Sē dinam kijukam wilnēywēn firčūḥičmin, šu-jal sē jafətkarnī wē lōḥ-ḥun kin būrayyand ḥunyas ulčinēywēn jinaywaḥičmin!
/seː diˈnam kid͡ʒuˈkam wilˈneːjweːn ˈfirt͡ʃuːħit͡ʃmin | ʃud͡ʒal seː d͡ʒaˈfətkarniː weː loːħħun kin buːrajˈjand ħunjas ult͡ʃiˈneːjweːn d͡ʒiˈnajwaħit͡ʃmin/
[se dɪˈnæ̃ŋ ˌkid͡ʒʊˈkæ̃m wɪlˈneːjwẽɱ ˈfirt͡ʃuˌħit͡ʃmɪ̃n | ʃʊd͡ʒɐl se d͡ʒɐˈfətkɐrˌniː we loħħʊ̃ŋ kɪ̃m ˌbuːrɐjˈjæ̃nd ħʊ̃njɐ‿ˌsult͡ʃɪˈneːjwẽn d͡ʒɪˈnajwɐˌħit͡ʃmɪ̃n]
sē din-am kijwōk-am wil-nē-iwēn firči-uḥič-min, šu=jal sē jafətkarn-ī wē lōˀ=ḥun kin būray-yand ḥun-yas ulči-nē-iwēn jina-iwaḥič-min
1s what-ERG.G.SG.INDEF cryptid-ERG.G.SG.INDEF see-NPST.GER-ABS.C.SG.DEF fear-DPs.NPST.IND-SG.DEF.OBJ, to=DIST 1s head_legged-ABS.G.SG.INDEF REL with=3s four face-ABS.A.PL.DEF 3s-POSS look_for-NPST.GER-ABS.C.SG.DEF not-DPs.NPST.SJV-SG.DEF.OBJ
I'm terrified of seeing any kind of legendary creature, so I'm definitely not going to go looking for a four-faced jafatkarni!



Theodish (Day 26):

heleg /ˈheːləj/ (adj.) holy, sacred, blessed
  • From Proto-Germanic *hailagaz
Derivations and Related Terms:
Spoiler:
helgon /ˈhɛlwən/ (v.) to hallow, to sanctify, to bless
  • From Proto-Germanic *hailagōną
heel /ˈheːl/ (adj.) whole, entire, complete, full
  • From Proto-Germanic *hailaz
  • The derived adverb, heeleg /ˈheːləj/, is a common intensifier
  • Sometimes found in poetry and literature as a noun meaning "omen"
helsen /ˈhɛlzən/ (v.) to greet, to salute, to inquire, to predict, to promise, to bode
  • From Proto-Germanic *hailisōną
helen /ˈheːlən/ (v.) to heal, to cure, to mend, to save
  • From Proto-Germanic *hailijaną
  • Either an ergative or transitive verb
  • There is a homophonous noun meaning "healing, cure, salvation, safety, welfare, well-being, prosperity, health": heelen /ˈheːlən/, from Proto-Germanic *hailīniz
helt /ˈhɛlt/ (n.) health, well-being
  • From Proto-Germanic *hailiþō
nerjen /ˈnɛrjən/ (v.) to save, to rescue, to deliver, to preserve, to heal
  • From Proto-Germanic *nazjaną
nare /ˈnaːr/ (n.) salvation, rescue, deliverance, assistance, aid, support
  • From Proto-Germanic *nazō
nesen /ˈneːzən/ (v.) to survive, to escape, to recover, to heal, to preserve, to save, to flee, to recover, to cure
  • From Proto-Germanic *nesaną
  • Either an ergative or transitive verb
  • Also found as genesen /jɛˈneːzən/, from Proto-Germanic *ganesaną, with approximately the same meaning
wercen /ˈwɛrt͡ʃən/ (v.) to work, to function
  • From Proto-Germanic *wurkijaną
  • An intransitive verb
werc /ˈwɛrk/ (n.) work, task, job, chore, profession, workplace, product
  • From Proto-Germanic *werką
wircen /ˈwɪrt͡ʃən/ (v.) to work, to make, to do, to carry out, to build, to cause, to produce, to effect, to affect
  • From Proto-Germanic *wirkijaną
  • A transitive verb
gewircen /jɛˈwɪrt͡ʃən/ (v.) to do, to carry out, to effect, to accomplish, to succeed
  • From Proto-Germanic *gawirkijaną
farwercen /farˈwɛrt͡ʃən/ (v.) to ruin, to destroy, to forfeit, to obstruct, to injure, to sin, to commit
  • From Proto-Germanic *frawurkijaną
send /ˈsɛnd/ (n.) sin, crime, offense, affront
  • From Proto-Germanic *sundī
senn /ˈsɛn/ (n.) responsibility, duty, care, concern
  • From Proto-Germanic *sunjǭ
soet /ˈsoːt/ (adj.) true, real
  • From Proto-Germanic *sanþaz
  • Can also be used as a noun meaning "truth, reality"
soden /ˈsoːdən/ (v.) to prove, to verify, to soothe, to ease, to reassure, to comfort, to assuage, to calm
  • From Proto-Germanic *sanþōną
festen /ˈfɛstən/ (v.) to fast, to observe a fast, to abstain
  • From Proto-Germanic *fastijaną
festnen /ˈfɛstnən/ (v.) to fasten, to tighten, to fix, to secure, to stabilize, to stick, to entrench
  • From Proto-Germanic *fastinōną
fast /ˈfast/ (adj.) fastened, tight, fixed, firm, secure, stable, constant, solid, stuck, entrenched
  • From Proto-Germanic *fastuz
Example:

Gif feste ig not erefore een heleg deg, soleg Kirstmesse, fele ig dat dat een send yst, and wille ig mien nare not farwercen.
/jɪf ˈfɛstə ɪj nɔt eːrˈfoːr eːn ˈheːləj dɛj | ˈsoːləj ˈkɪrstməs | ˈfeːlə ɪj dat dat eːn sɛnd ɪst | and ˈwɪlə ɪj miːn naːr nɔt farˈwɛrt͡ʃən/
[jɪ ˈfɛs‿tɛj nə‿tɛrˈfoː‿rə‿ˈneːle ˈdɛj | ˈzoːle ˈkɪrstməs | ˈveː‿lɛj dət̚ ˈdæ‿tən ˈzɛn‿dɪs | ɒn‿ˈdwɪ‿lɛj mɪ ˈnaːr nət̚ fɒrˈwɛrt͡ʃə]
gif fest-e ig not erefore een heleg deg, soleg Kirstmesse, fel-e ig dat dat een send yst, and will-e ig mien nare not farwerc-en
if fast-1s.PRES.SVJ 1s.NOM NEG before INDEF holy day, such_as Christmas, feel-1s.PRES.IND 1s.NOM that that INDEF sin be.3s.PRES.IND, and want-1s.PRES.IND 1s.NOM 1s.POSS salvation NEG ruin-INF
If I don't fast before a holy day, like Christmas, I feel like that's a sin, and I don't want to forfeit my salvation.



I've had the Proto-AY root for "beast, dangerous animal" for a while, but I guess I just never thought about how it would look post-sound changes before putting together this post, because I've only just now realized that the reflex in Y²KS reminds me of "Wookiee". Not an intentional reference, but I think I'll keep it.


shimobaatar wrote:
10 Dec 2019 04:18
Iyionaku wrote:
09 Dec 2019 08:26
One a side note, Shimo can I ask you to release the topic for the final week (29th-31st) on the 27th latest? I will not be available over new year's and would like to do the last days beforehand.
Oh, absolutely! You might have to remind me once we get closer to that time of the month, but I shouldn't have a problem coming up with something a few days earlier than expected.
shimobaatar wrote:
18 Dec 2019 01:26
Khemehekis wrote:
17 Dec 2019 06:56
A thought: A lot of Lexember's weekly themes have centered around December and the holidays, like "Giving" or "Food".
Hmm, interesting. "giving" definitely was chosen for its seasonal relevance, so to speak, but "food" and "emotion" were really just chosen because they're fairly broad categories (leaving room for creativity) that people generally talk about a lot (hopefully making them useful for vocabulary-building). I was actually trying to avoid seasonal inspiration, at least for the past two weeks, but now that you've brought it up, I can see where you're coming from.
Khemehekis wrote:
17 Dec 2019 06:56
Considering that there's an indie rock band named the Decemberists, do you suppose we could make the theme for the last three days of December "Music"?
I can't say I'm familiar with them, and I wasn't expecting any requests, so to speak, but unless anyone who's been participating/is planning to participate has any objections, I'll definitely consider it, if I don't end up including it in next week's theme somehow. "music" is a fairly broad, useful topic.
As requested, week 5's theme, Time, Repetition, Cyclicality, Rhythm, and Music, has been added to the OP a few days early.

User avatar
Corphishy
greek
greek
Posts: 777
Joined: 18 May 2013 18:28
Location: Route 102, Route 117, Petalburg City

Re: Lexember 2019

Post by Corphishy » 27 Dec 2019 04:04

26th December

mīrkil
[ˈmiːrg̊ɪl]
n.
chance, probability; uncertainty; accident
Aszev wrote:A good conlang doesn't come from pursuing uniqueness. Uniqueness is usually an effect from creating a good conlang.
Project Garnet
(used to be Bulbichu22)

Clio
sinic
sinic
Posts: 241
Joined: 27 Dec 2012 23:45

Re: Lexember 2019

Post by Clio » 27 Dec 2019 04:15

25th Lexember

kīmakī /kiːmakiː/ n funeral ceremony; mourning-song

26th Lexember

maṛika /marˤika/ n witch, witch-doctor
Niûro nCora
Getic: longum Getico murmur in ore fuit
scratchpad

User avatar
Dormouse559
moderator
moderator
Posts: 2907
Joined: 10 Nov 2012 20:52
Location: California

Re: Lexember 2019

Post by Dormouse559 » 27 Dec 2019 04:42

VaptuantaDoi wrote:
27 Dec 2019 01:43
(Demonstrating some of the derivational morphology and pseudo-passives)
Well, color me conjugated! That's super neat! [:3]

User avatar
qwed117
mongolian
mongolian
Posts: 4612
Joined: 20 Nov 2014 02:27

Re: Lexember 2019

Post by qwed117 » 27 Dec 2019 05:14

Lexember 26

*bŋ̩ʲs₃-i n sky, heaven, haven, air
*baŋʲs₃n̩-/*baŋʲs₃n̩ːd- n god; the uppermost god, from *bŋ̩ʲs₃-e 'sky' + *ten̥- 'ruler', or from from *bŋ̩ʲs₃-e 'sky' + *s₂n̩d-o 'father'
*praws₁-e v to carry
*kis₃n-a v to break
*bˀudyor adj bare, barefooted, naked, torn apart and strewn


:it-sa: bínchere v to win
Spoiler:
My minicity is Zyphrazia and Novland
What is made of man will crumble away.

Iyionaku
mayan
mayan
Posts: 1725
Joined: 25 May 2014 14:17

Re: Lexember 2019

Post by Iyionaku » 27 Dec 2019 18:06

Lexember 27th - Yélian

octal [ˈotɐl] - ritual, periodic ceremony, also: rhythm

Etymology: from oc "continuative prefix" + tal "noun suffix indicating certain events"

Píydiro ta brudet, yibocet tao octal pi pasidelacet espani prena sep evaneʻi.
[ˈpa̯iːdɨɾɔ̈ taː ˈbɾuːdət, ɕɨˈboːkət taʊ̯ ˈotɐl pɨ pɐˌsiːdəˈlaːkət ˈespɐni ˈpɾeːnɐ səp əʋɐˈneːʔi]
whenever 3SG.FEM.OBL bake-3SG, PST-become-3SG 3SG.FEM.POSS ritual that always-hit-3SG egg-PL-ENUM two at each_other
It's become her ritual whenever she's baking that she hits two eggs against each other.
Wipe the glass. This is the usual way to start, even in the days, day and night, only a happy one.

User avatar
ixals
sinic
sinic
Posts: 432
Joined: 28 Jul 2015 18:43

Re: Lexember 2019

Post by ixals » 27 Dec 2019 19:37

27th December

:con: Elá

mewú /məˈwu/ - onomatopoeia
1.) cow
2.) bull, ox
Native: :deu:
Learning: :gbr:, :chn:, :tur:, :fra:

Zhér·dûn a tonal Germanic conlang

old stuff: Цiски | Noattȯč | Tungōnis Vīdīnōs

Allekanger
cuneiform
cuneiform
Posts: 168
Joined: 01 Feb 2012 00:27
Location: Suecia

Re: Lexember 2019

Post by Allekanger » 27 Dec 2019 19:49

Ivook, Lexember 27th:

GREN [jiren] jiren 'caraway'
OSK [osak] osak 'thyme'
QSONL [iʃoniɬ] isonil 'oregano'
MRST [miriʃit] mirisit 'coriander'
RMSUM [ramiʃum] ramisum 'saffron'

User avatar
spanick
roman
roman
Posts: 1184
Joined: 11 May 2017 01:47
Location: California

Re: Lexember 2019

Post by spanick » 27 Dec 2019 22:26

shimobaatar wrote:
24 Dec 2019 05:59
spanick wrote:
23 Dec 2019 18:10
Not sure when I'll be able to post again, so I'm gonna post mine for Lexember 23-26.
I hope everything's alright!
Everything's fine, thanks! Just with Christmas and everything, I wasn't sure if I'd have time to post.

***

Weddisch

Lexember 27
trow /tɾoʊ/ n.n. ‘traditional Weddisch dance’
Spoiler:
This dance is considered a traditiona Weddisch folk dance. It is done by creating a large circle of people with arms interlocked over the shoulders dancers move clockwise very slowly by crossing their right foot over their left while singing/chanting traditional Weddisch songs, poem, or even hymns. This form of singing/chanting is also referred to as trow.
Lexember 28
Minne Sims /mɪnə zɪmz/ m.n. ‘Menno Simons’
Spoiler:
Most Weddisch are Anabaptists, which was historically based on the teaching of Menno Simons. Even to this day, religiosity is much stronger amongst the Weddisch than other populations of Europe. In a 2009 Gallup poll which asked “Is religion important in your daily life?” 60% of Weddisch speakers answered “yes.” Compare this to the countries which they live is at large: the Netherlands, 33% and Germany, 40%.
Túrnnan

Lexember 27
strígh /stɾaɪɣ/ f.n. ‘witch’

Lexember 28
mälaglu /mɛlɑglʌ/ m.n. ‘evil-eye’

User avatar
Jackk
roman
roman
Posts: 1180
Joined: 04 Aug 2012 13:08
Location: Damborn, Isr Boral

Re: Lexember 2019

Post by Jackk » 27 Dec 2019 23:45

27th Lexember

Boral

stif jacent /stɪf ʒaˈʣɛnt/ [stɪf ʒɐˈʣɛn(t)] recumbent satiety (food coma)
< Attested with current meaning from 19C; literally "load that lies down". First word meaning "load, stuffing", deverbal of stivar "to load, to stuff, to crowd", from Latin stīpō "I crowd, I compress". Second word the present participle of jacir "to lie down, to rest" (also in colloquial speech, "to sleep"), from Latin iaciō "I lie down".

Refers to the sleepy state one enters when one has eaten perhaps too much food.

Jo dorme pre l'hour un ; nos ayau tout stif jacent dy Fest Reveglon.
I was asleep before one; we were all sleepily stuffed from the Christmas meal.
/ˌʒo dɔʁˈme ˌpʁe luʀ ˈɪn | ˌno‿zɛˈjo tut ˈstɪf ʒaˈʣɛnt di ˈfɛst ˌʀeviˈlɔn/
[ˌʒo dʊːˈme ˌpʀe lʊː‿ˈʀɪn | ˌno‿zɪˈjo tʊt ˈstɪf ʒɐˈʣɛn dɪ ˈfɛst ˌʀevɪˈlɔn]
mundum impūrum incolāmus
hamteu n'un mont sug
let us live in a dirty world

User avatar
gach
MVP
MVP
Posts: 725
Joined: 07 Aug 2013 01:26
Location: displaced from Helsinki

Re: Lexember 2019

Post by gach » 28 Dec 2019 01:59

26.

Inaki

ãŋə, bone n
aŋsə/ãŋsə, divine v

The verb for "divine" is derived from the noun ãŋə for "bone" due to a practice of divining from small pieces of animal bones. In the later practices both tossing the bones and bouncing them on a drum membrane are attested. The standard form of the derived verb is aŋsə since the verbaliser suffix -sə overrides the stem final ə and the resulting consonant cluster -ŋs- turns the preceding syllable into a closed one. In proto Inaki there was an active morphophonetic rule banning long vowels from closed syllables, hence the short vowel in the verb stem. However, this rule didn't stay active for too long and there also exist later forms that seem to descend from a stem variant ãŋsə that would have had a long vowel. In these cases the old derived word was re-derived at a somewhat later time, using the exact same morphological material but now bypassing the defunct sound rule.

Inland family

fa, in front of prep
fesa, front/future n
kein, do v itr.
kVfesa, divine v itr.

The noun fesa for "front/future" is derived from the preposition fa using the participle infix -es-. It seems thus that at an earlier stage the Inland prepositions were fairly verblike. This was not the case anymore at the proto language stage and the noun stem was again verbalised using the prefix kV-, derived from the verb kein, "do". This became a general verbaliser, akin to -sə in Inaki, and is most typically attested as simply k- in the later Inland languages.


27.

Inaki

šæjsa, "ring, enclosed or encircled sacred space"

This word appears with both mundane and religious meanings in the later Inaki languages, often both at the same time. The motivation behind the long lasting active double meaning is that the dedicated sacred spaces are in the Inaki traditions predominantly demarcated by a physical and often deliberately constructed limit helping to separate the sacred from the mundane.
ImageKištaLkal sikSeic

Clio
sinic
sinic
Posts: 241
Joined: 27 Dec 2012 23:45

Re: Lexember 2019

Post by Clio » 28 Dec 2019 04:05

27th Lexember

ṣukītaka /sˤukiːtaka/ n type of date commonly used in magic potions
Niûro nCora
Getic: longum Getico murmur in ore fuit
scratchpad

User avatar
qwed117
mongolian
mongolian
Posts: 4612
Joined: 20 Nov 2014 02:27

Re: Lexember 2019

Post by qwed117 » 28 Dec 2019 04:12

Lexember 27th
*eːdˀj-a v to stretch, to extend
*tn̩s-o v to dare, to surprise
*pler-i v to go
*Smarg-e n marshland, swamp
*gˀr̩ːh₁-o n dog
*jur-e n foot

:it-sa: odhéu! intj Good god!, Oh lord!
Spoiler:
My minicity is Zyphrazia and Novland
What is made of man will crumble away.

Iyionaku
mayan
mayan
Posts: 1725
Joined: 25 May 2014 14:17

Re: Lexember 2019

Post by Iyionaku » 28 Dec 2019 11:31

As today is my last day where I can participate in Lexember, here come my last four entries of this year!
This also means that for the first time in history I managed to keep it up till the last day!

Lexember 28th - Yélian

pordék [pɔ̈ɾˈdek] - lantern

Etymology: From Caelian pordek "light"

Lexember 29th - Yélian

iaduló [ˌɪ̯aːdʉˈloː] - album

Etymology: From iadul "song" + collective suffix

Lexember 30th - Yélian

sivaioc [sɨˈʋaɪ̯.ɔ̈k] - hourglass

Etymology: From sivaia "to float" + oc "clock"

Lexember 31th - Yélian

silvèstre [sɨlˈvɛstɾə] - New Year's eve [Northern Standard]
brandán [bɾɐnˈdaːn] - New Year's eve [Southern Standard]

ETYMOLOGY I: from German Silvester.
ETYMOLOGY II: derivation from my fictional world into the real world; brandán is the last evening of the Yélian year, which typically ends in late August.

Example sentence

»Deʻaytuilan« yiperbarvi iadulóquet. Vat bulot sipuyæpradatsbit can cenim iaduletaniyca, »Pordek è sivaiocan u brandán« can broyadartu u reconitiy.
["ˈdeːʔɐʃˌtuːlɐn" ɕɨpəɾˈbarvi ˌɪ̯aːdʉˈloːkət | vɐ‿ˈbulɔ̈t sɨˌpuːʃəˈpɾaːdɐt͡sbɨt‿ɐn ˈkeːnɨm ˈɪ̯aːdʉləˌtaːna̯iːkɐ, "ˈpɔɾdək ɛ sɨˈʋaɪ̯.ɔ̈kɐn u bɾɐnˈdaːn" kɐn ˈbɾoːʃɐˌdaɾtʉ u ˌɾekɔ̈ˈniːta̯iː]
raven-silver-PL PST-release-3PL album-new | DEM band still-well_known-COP.3SG.ANIM for 3PL.POSS song-SUP-sucessful-COMP, lantern and hourglass-PL TEMP new_years_eve | about man-lonely TEMP new year
"The Silver Ravens" released a new album. This band is still known best for their most successful song, "A lantern and hourglasses at New Year's", a song about a lonely man at New Year.
Wipe the glass. This is the usual way to start, even in the days, day and night, only a happy one.

User avatar
Corphishy
greek
greek
Posts: 777
Joined: 18 May 2013 18:28
Location: Route 102, Route 117, Petalburg City

Re: Lexember 2019

Post by Corphishy » 28 Dec 2019 11:59

27th December

kēksise
/ˈkeːkθɪθe/
n.
support, defense; backup
28th December

ožedi
/oˈʒedɪ/
n.
morality, goodness
Aszev wrote:A good conlang doesn't come from pursuing uniqueness. Uniqueness is usually an effect from creating a good conlang.
Project Garnet
(used to be Bulbichu22)

User avatar
Jackk
roman
roman
Posts: 1180
Joined: 04 Aug 2012 13:08
Location: Damborn, Isr Boral

Re: Lexember 2019

Post by Jackk » 28 Dec 2019 14:29

28th Lexember

Boral

jeunar /ʒawˈnaʀ/ [ʒɐwˈnɑː] to fast, to not eat

< from Old Boral ieunar, from Latin ieiūnō "I fast". Synchronically analysable as jeun "fast" + verbal -ar. With prefix des- < Latin dis-, we have desjeun "breakfast", desjeunar "to have breakfast".

Nos som jeunant y jorn, pu colluïsc mey a masquet pos occas vars un grant quelt.
We're fasting during the day, but come with me to mosque after sunset for a big dinner.
/no ˈsɔm ʒawˈnant i ˈʒɔʀn | pi ˌkɔlaˈjɪx mi a masˈkwɛt pɔz oˈkaz vaʀz ɪn ˌgʀant ˈkwɛlt/
[nʊ ˈsɔm ʒɐwˈnan‿tɪ ˈʒɔːn | pi ˌkɔlɐˈjɪç mi a mɐsˈkwɛt pɔz ʊˈkaz vɑːz ɪŋ ˌgʀant ˈkwɛwt]
mundum impūrum incolāmus
hamteu n'un mont sug
let us live in a dirty world

User avatar
ixals
sinic
sinic
Posts: 432
Joined: 28 Jul 2015 18:43

Re: Lexember 2019

Post by ixals » 28 Dec 2019 16:52

28th December

:con: Elá

kí háma /ˈki ˈha.ma/ - from "small" and háma "food, to eat"
1.) to snack
2.) snack
>> 3.) provisions
Native: :deu:
Learning: :gbr:, :chn:, :tur:, :fra:

Zhér·dûn a tonal Germanic conlang

old stuff: Цiски | Noattȯč | Tungōnis Vīdīnōs

Post Reply