(Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by shimobaatar » 03 Feb 2019 21:27

LinguoFranco wrote:
03 Feb 2019 20:56
How essential is it to have a conpeople to speak a conlang? I’m working on a personal language that still strives to be naturalistic, and I’m starting to think I should have people who speak it.
There's very little that's "essential" for conlanging. If you want to create a culture as well, that's great, but don't feel like you have to just because some other people do it.

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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by sangi39 » 04 Feb 2019 01:06

LinguoFranco wrote:
03 Feb 2019 20:56
How essential is it to have a conpeople to speak a conlang? I’m working on a personal language that still strives to be naturalistic, and I’m starting to think I should have people who speak it.
Definitely with Creyeditor on this one. Conlangs go well beyond "spoken by a fictional group of people". I mean, look at Esperanto, the entire point of which is to be spoken by real-world people, and personal languages certainly do exist as well, but I think they tend to go largely undocumented, I assume because they more or less only turn up in personal diaries.

I suppose it's not impossible for a conlang to be both a personal language, and the language of a fictional people.
You can tell the same lie a thousand times,
But it never gets any more true,
So close your eyes once more and once more believe
That they all still believe in you.
Just one time.

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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Reyzadren » 04 Feb 2019 01:24

^Yup, my conlang is both a personal language, and a language in a fictional world [:D], through contrived coincidence.

New question: How does one view their conlang's difficulty, OOC or IC? (this quick question probably isn't worthy of its own thread)

OOCly, I think it's one of the easiest, compared to most conlangs. I don't like learning natlangs because they are difficult for me, but using my own is just a breeze. Some members here commented that it resembles a clone of English, which could be a factor, but I suppose its regularity is also helpful in general, amongst other features. There is simply nothing linguistically complicated about it imo. 1/5.

In-conworld, it is one of the most commonly spoken languages, partly due to its ease and accessibility. Though I suspect that there are much more conworld-specific words there, even non-native speakers would most likely consider it as 1/5.
Image Soundcloud Profile | Image griuskant conlang

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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Shemtov » 13 Feb 2019 23:10

Is a tense-based split-erg protolang more likely to evolve split-s or fluid-s?
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Cẅènyon » 14 Feb 2019 16:13

Never mind what I wrote before, I apologize.
Last edited by Cẅènyon on 14 Feb 2019 22:07, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by gestaltist » 14 Feb 2019 20:08

Shemtov wrote:
13 Feb 2019 23:10
Is a tense-based split-erg protolang more likely to evolve split-s or fluid-s?
I think the evolution of split-s vs fluid-s has to do mostly with the lexical items available in the language. If the proto-language tends to have separate volitional vs non-volitional verbs, it's somewhat less likely to evolve fluid-s because that distinction is already covered lexically. Otherwise, anything goes.

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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by gestaltist » 14 Feb 2019 20:11

Cẅènyon wrote:
14 Feb 2019 16:13
Hello. Are there any latinised names for grammatical cases matching with the expressions "according to" and "far from"? Which ones should have grammatical numbers matching with "many", "more" and "less" (these two last like in "more/less chairs, buttons, etc.)?
I'd go with "considerative" and "distal", respectively. I am not quite sure what you're asking in your second question.

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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Cẅènyon » 16 Feb 2019 19:26

Sorry for my previous question, I don't know what I was thinking on.
Next question: which letter would you use to romanize an stressed [æ] sound? First, an unestressed [æ] is spelled as <ä> in my conlang, and I use macrons to mark stress. Though I know <ǟ> is used in some languages' romanizations, I don't quite like both diacritics on the same side of the grapheme, so I have created a new character with typeit.org, <ā̤> (in case some computers don't display it, it's an A with a macron above and diaeresis below). Which of both would you use for your romanization systems (in case you used <ä> in your alphabet)?

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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by sangi39 » 16 Feb 2019 19:46

Cẅènyon wrote:
16 Feb 2019 19:26
Sorry for my previous question, I don't know what I was thinking on.
Next question: which letter would you use to romanize an stressed [æ] sound? First, an unestressed [æ] is spelled as <ä> in my conlang, and I use macrons to mark stress. Though I know <ǟ> is used in some languages' romanizations, I don't quite like both diacritics on the same side of the grapheme, so I have created a new character with typeit.org, <ā̤> (in case some computers don't display it, it's an A with a macron above and diaeresis below). Which of both would you use for your romanization systems (in case you used <ä> in your alphabet)?
I'm assuming plain <ā> is already being used, so have you considered <> or <â>?
You can tell the same lie a thousand times,
But it never gets any more true,
So close your eyes once more and once more believe
That they all still believe in you.
Just one time.

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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Cẅènyon » 16 Feb 2019 20:46

sangi39 wrote:
16 Feb 2019 19:46
I'm assuming plain <ā> is already being used, so have you considered <> or <â>?
I think I'll take the one with the circumflex. Thanks for that.
And another question: can collective, singulative, singular and plural numbers exist and a same language?
Would it be logical or naturalistic to use the first two to mark noun undefiniteness and last two for definite nouns?

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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by sangi39 » 16 Feb 2019 20:53

Cẅènyon wrote:
16 Feb 2019 20:46
sangi39 wrote:
16 Feb 2019 19:46
I'm assuming plain <ā> is already being used, so have you considered <> or <â>?
I think I'll take the one with the circumflex. Thanks for that.
And another question: can collective, singulative, singular and plural numbers exist and a same language?
Would it be logical or naturalistic to use the first two to mark noun undefiniteness and last two for definite nouns?
IIRC, Welsh has both singular vs. plural (tad ~ tadau, father ~ fathers), and collective vs. singulative (moch ~ mochyn, pigs ~ pig), so that at least is plausible. I can't think of a word off of the top of my head, though, which falls into both groups.

As for using such a system to mark definiteness, I don't know. I can't see how it would happen, but maybe somebody else can.
You can tell the same lie a thousand times,
But it never gets any more true,
So close your eyes once more and once more believe
That they all still believe in you.
Just one time.

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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Omzinesý » 16 Feb 2019 21:00

sangi39 wrote:
16 Feb 2019 20:53
Cẅènyon wrote:
16 Feb 2019 20:46
sangi39 wrote:
16 Feb 2019 19:46
I'm assuming plain <ā> is already being used, so have you considered <> or <â>?
I think I'll take the one with the circumflex. Thanks for that.
And another question: can collective, singulative, singular and plural numbers exist and a same language?
Would it be logical or naturalistic to use the first two to mark noun undefiniteness and last two for definite nouns?
IIRC, Welsh has both singular vs. plural (tad ~ tadau, father ~ fathers), and collective vs. singulative (moch ~ mochyn, pigs ~ pig), so that at least is plausible. I can't think of a word off of the top of my head, though, which falls into both groups.

As for using such a system to mark definiteness, I don't know. I can't see how it would happen, but maybe somebody else can.
Depends what you mean with those therms. I'm supposing you just speak about the morphological marking that singular and collective are unmarked while singulative and plural are marked.

Do you mean that the same unmarked form means both definite singular and indefinite plural while definite plural and indefinite singular have marked forms?
If there are other means for marking definiteness and/or number beside that, I don't think it's as bad an idea as it first appears.

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