What did you accomplish today?

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DesEsseintes
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by DesEsseintes » 04 Sep 2018 08:16

A possible gradation system for Limestone?

Code: Select all

p     x     w
ps    xs    y
pł    xł    r
px    x(x)  w
t     s     r/y
ts    s(s)  ry
tł    ł     r
tsx   sx    rw
k     x     w
ks    xs    y
kł    xł    r
kx    x(x)  w

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Linguifex
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Linguifex » 07 Sep 2018 03:04

The "continents" on my conworld have names in Ĝade n Tim Ar:
  • Máðíhír
  • Tethír
  • Nȝûrin
  • Ȝurkéłis
  • Sóhatékhír
  • ʕeteĝkuólo
  • Tuóntón
  • Matanhír
Also, I worked on the Six Great Thefts (Klnim ü Ikĝȝô m 'Tür Ðáraʕ).
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WeepingElf
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by WeepingElf » 07 Sep 2018 20:39

Why is "continents" in quotes? Are these really just large islands, subcontinents or continent-sized political units?
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Linguifex
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Linguifex » 08 Sep 2018 01:29

WeepingElf wrote:
07 Sep 2018 20:39
Why is "continents" in quotes? Are these really just large islands, subcontinents or continent-sized political units?
The first five are continent-sized political/cultural/geographic units that constitute a supercontinent. The remaining three are their own separate entities.
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Omzinesý
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Omzinesý » 08 Sep 2018 12:08

DesEsseintes wrote:
04 Sep 2018 08:16
A possible gradation system for Limestone?

Code: Select all

p     x     w
ps    xs    y
pł    xł    r
px    x(x)  w
t     s     r/y
ts    s(s)  ry
tł    ł     r
tsx   sx    rw
k     x     w
ks    xs    y
kł    xł    r
kx    x(x)  w
What sound changes in what contexts cause them?

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DesEsseintes
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by DesEsseintes » 08 Sep 2018 14:51

Omzinesý wrote:
08 Sep 2018 12:08
DesEsseintes wrote:
04 Sep 2018 08:16
A possible gradation system for Limestone?

Code: Select all

p     x     w
ps    xs    y
pł    xł    r
px    x(x)  w
t     s     r/y
ts    s(s)  ry
tł    ł     r
tsx   sx    rw
k     x     w
ks    xs    y
kł    xł    r
kx    x(x)  w
What sound changes in what contexts cause them?
The general idea is to do something vaguely Finnish albeit not as thoroughgoing. Most stems would only show two grades, either 1 and 2, or 2 and 3, and I'd like to see these stem grades operating in valency marking on verbs for instance.

I have a competing idea of gemination occurring when a short vowel is shortened. Like this:
iit → it → itt

I haven’t decided whether to combine the two ideas. Do let me know if you have wild ideas!

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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by bbbourq » 08 Sep 2018 15:34

I discovered a new word related to the religious custom in the Lorthoan culture that I would like to share:

behashi, pl. behasheni [ bɛˈhaʃi ] [ bɛhaˈʃɛni ]
n. masc
  1. a liquid concoction used to heighten one’s senses; often consumed during religious rites of passage to encourage the consumer's body to receive information from the universe and face one’s fears
Behashi is a drink that is used to bring the consumer into a state which opens up, shall we say, the crown chakra. I do not know what this drink is comprised of, though I think it might be related to the neilanu tree which has religious, cultural, and historical significance. It is said that once this liquid is consumed, it allows the consumer to receive information (read: visions) from the universal power and to face their (internal) fears. I find a lot of similarities with this religion and Buddhism, although I know there are differences between the two. I still have yet to find the actual name of it which intrigues me so. It has a very special connection with nature and the universe, but I am unsure if this connection gives the practitioners any special powers or abilities; I have not found any direct evidence to support this claim. However, there is plenty of circumstantial evidence which points to certain abilities in the spiritual realm and, perhaps, some relation to telepathy. This is mere speculation at the moment.
https://lortho.conlang.org

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DesEsseintes
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by DesEsseintes » 08 Sep 2018 16:59

Been playing around with diphthongs in Limestone. The vowel inventory is /a i o u/ and most combos are allowed though the components in a diphthong must either agree in height (±high) or backness (±back).

The possibilities then are as follows:

ao oa
ai ou
ia uo
iu ui


I think it’s likely that either component of all diphthongs can be long, and then normally it’s accented. Both components cannot be long (glide excrescence may occur in such situations?).

Almost forgot! There are also two triphthongs:

aou oai

Sample vocab:

astłiúxtuo
ixtłiraóó’o
a’táoutsxu
ałkúúo / ałkúúwa
ó’ruixtłi
ispuóó’yixta


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Linguifex
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Linguifex » 08 Sep 2018 19:26

I guess this was yesterday, technically, but I took the Tim Ar terms for the Six Great Thefts, worked them backwards to Proto-Tim Ar-O, and found the O reflexes:

m̩háɹà : əβeja
ɬɯ̀skɤ́ : uxiːja
tòlɤ̀ : tə
mìnʕès : nɨneː
tóktìθ : tuksɨː
túàlʕà : tuχʷa
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Lambuzhao
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Lambuzhao » 10 Sep 2018 15:11

shimobaatar wrote:
01 Sep 2018 13:45
Lambuzhao wrote:
01 Sep 2018 13:42
Anybody know a reason why my particular dialect of :usa: English (SE :us-pa: ) has [oj] for [aj] in words like 'nice' or something like [əj] in 'ice'? I'm not sure if that's a known feature of 'Philly' English, but I definitely hear it in Bucks, (Western) Montgomery counties on the periphery of the city. It comes darn near to sounding like Aussie English, for some reason. Too far inland to be Toide Doialect (?)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_raising?
Very interesting! Thanks. [:)] [;)]

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gach
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by gach » 10 Sep 2018 17:20

DesEsseintes wrote:
08 Sep 2018 14:51
Omzinesý wrote:
08 Sep 2018 12:08
DesEsseintes wrote:
04 Sep 2018 08:16
A possible gradation system for Limestone?

Code: Select all

p     x     w
ps    xs    y
pł    xł    r
px    x(x)  w
t     s     r/y
ts    s(s)  ry
tł    ł     r
tsx   sx    rw
k     x     w
ks    xs    y
kł    xł    r
kx    x(x)  w
What sound changes in what contexts cause them?
The general idea is to do something vaguely Finnish albeit not as thoroughgoing. Most stems would only show two grades, either 1 and 2, or 2 and 3, and I'd like to see these stem grades operating in valency marking on verbs for instance.

I have a competing idea of gemination occurring when a short vowel is shortened. Like this:
iit → it → itt

I haven’t decided whether to combine the two ideas. Do let me know if you have wild ideas!
Working out at least the original phonological conditions for the gradation is always helpful. It works also for deciding where and how to break the pattern by making the original conditioning unproductive. Especially if you are going to involve gradation in grammaticalised paradigmatic alternations, that's the way I'd proceed.

I still have a fair bit of ironing to do with Kišta, but the basic gradation pattern there follows roughly the Saamic style lengthening gradation. There's rhythmic lengthening of onset consonants in open syllables, governed by the stress pattern, followed by lenition of unlengthened onsets in unstressed syllables, yielding the strong and weak grades. Consonants or clusters falling at the start of syllables with primary or secondary stress are immune to both of these processes, forming a third neutral grade. Quite often the weak and neutral grades are identical.

Later agglutination processes can break the regular pattern. For example, the anaphoric SG3 human pronominal -ti is a fairly recent development out of a cliticised deictic pronoun and doesn't appear in the expected strong grade. It simply attaches to the inflected 3rd person verb, leaving its original gradation pattern untouched. It does, however, get the regular weak grade form -đin when combined with the pronominal plural -n to create the corresponding anaphoric PL3 pronominal.

Code: Select all

nisi-k     sleep-SG1      "I slept"
nisi-n     sleep-SG2      "you slept"
nissi      sleep.3        "(he/she/it/they ...) slept"
nissi-ti   sleep-SG3.ANA  "he/she slept"                (instead of regular *nisi-tti)

nissi-đin  sleep-PL3.ANA  "they slept"
I'll probably also end up having a fair bit of irregular weak grades in Kišta for word forms that have just recently lost final consonants. If you wish, you could always describe these using the regular gradation rules by invoking a zero coda consonant, but I'm not sure if that's the description I want to go with.

I hope you'll find these musings at least somewhat helpful. The latest thing I found myself thinking concerning the Kišta gradation was what to do with the glides /ʋ j ɦ/ that don't exist as geminates when they fall in the strong grade. I may or may not go with adding an extra subsyllabic pulse to the preceding vowel. It's a neat idea but I'm not sure it plays well with the feel of the language.
ImageKištaLkal sikSeic

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Frislander
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Frislander » 10 Sep 2018 19:39

I'm finally working on a polysynthetic project again (I posted the phonology here - I'm really pleased with it, it's quite uniquely original by my standards), which strangely enough I haven't been recently (the two projects currently on my plate with most development, Frislandian and my Caucasian Semitic project are synthetic sure but not poly really). On the flipside however this language is rather lacking in the voice-department, having only a causative and applicative, and using reflexive pronouns (something I don't think I've used in years). I reckon the name would be something like witə ‘astə‘ə "human language". It has noun class too, which I'm liking using to their full potential. Here's a short text I've just composed.

xə yin natyə wa taŋatrara ‘iwə. ‘inityatrəra netyə. ‘inya‘piyəra nyemenyə nyammə nyantyə ‘isatiyəx. ‘inamə‘untityəra ‘i‘a‘pə‘ən taŋayəx wa namənatyuyəra.
xə yin n-atyə wa t-aŋa<atr>-ra ‘i-wə. ‘i-n-ityə<atr>-ra n-etyə. ‘i-ny-a‘pə-yə-ra ny-emenyə ny-ammə ny-antyə ‘i-s-ati-yəx. ‘i-n-amə-‘-untə-ityə-ra ‘i-‘-a‘pə-‘ə-n t-aŋa-yəx wa n-amə-n-atyu-yə-ra.
DECL EXST IIs-otter CONJ Vs-house<APPL>-REP 3-SG. 3-IIs-walk.PRF<APPL>-REP IIs-river. 3-IIpl-catch-PRF-REP IIpl-minnow IIpl-five IIpl-three 3-IIIpl-hand-ADV. 3-IIs-fish-IV-carry-walk.PRF-REP 3-IV-catch-NOM-NOMP Vs-house-ADV CONJ IIs-fish-IIs-eat-PRF-REP
There was an otter that lived in a house. He went to the river. He caught 8 minnows with his hands. He carried his catch home and ate it.

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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by shimobaatar » 12 Sep 2018 17:16

Lambuzhao wrote:
10 Sep 2018 15:11
shimobaatar wrote:
01 Sep 2018 13:45
Lambuzhao wrote:
01 Sep 2018 13:42
Anybody know a reason why my particular dialect of :usa: English (SE :us-pa: ) has [oj] for [aj] in words like 'nice' or something like [əj] in 'ice'? I'm not sure if that's a known feature of 'Philly' English, but I definitely hear it in Bucks, (Western) Montgomery counties on the periphery of the city. It comes darn near to sounding like Aussie English, for some reason. Too far inland to be Toide Doialect (?)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_raising?
Very interesting! Thanks. [:)] [;)]
No problem! It's probably one of the most distinctive things about my accent/dialect to people out here in Indiana where I go to school.

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Linguifex
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Linguifex » 13 Sep 2018 06:08

I created some new Tim Ar words and began work on a hieroglyphic script for them:

Image
Forty percent of a full name, Éðenȝuúühé ré Áʕeimhromskúlnhéü.
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by SLiV » 17 Sep 2018 11:04

Started translating a piece of a fable I wrote, into Maran.

Δησβαστε Ιντεστε
[dæsbɑstʃ ɪntɛstʃ]
dysboss.NOM.CONJ sun.NOM.CONJ
The Tyrant and the Sun

Μαχα χρονα πριν, εν χρονον εντι ναμ δ' εσσ' ηνας κεννις, Βαστι Νορι τει δησβας αμ ωμηνε νοιμιν Ιμρας, βας δε Δραμιτα.
[mɑxa xrona prɪn, ɛn xronɔn ɛnti naw dɛsænɑs kɛnɪs, bɑsti nori tɛɪ dɛsbɑs aw umænə nɔɪmɪn ɪwrɑs, bɑs dɛ drɑmida]
Tall.PL.OBL time.PL.OBL ago, in time.OBL in-what.OBL NEG-INDEF of 1PLI NEG.COP.3SG bear.PART.FEM, deep.PL.NOM south.PL.NOM by dysboss.OBL COP.3PL rule.PART.PL call.PART.SG.OBL Imras, king.NOM of Dramite.PL.OBL
A long time ago, in a time when none of us were born, the Far South was ruled by a tyrant named Imras, king of the Dramites.

Ωβαν Ιμραν οσαι καιναι αμ οσοι ορτοι σαμ.
[ubɑn iwrɑn ozɑɪ kɑɪnɑɪ aw ozɔɪ ɔrtɔɪ saw]
POSS-king.OBL Imras.OBL many.PL.NOM wife.PL.NOM COP.3PL many.PL.NOM toe.PL.NOM COP.3PL
King Imras had as many wives as he had toes.
:nld: native | :eng: fluent | :deu: :fra: :esp: reading | :lat: :grc: translating

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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Clio » 24 Sep 2018 22:45

I translated this graffito from Herculaneum into Getic:

Túmī míhiz
Tomis-loc.sg die-2sg.fut.act
yestú duktą̂
be-3sg.imp luck-nom.sg
Niûro nCora
Getic: longum Getico murmur in ore fuit
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Ahzoh
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Ahzoh » 25 Sep 2018 20:30

I now have a diagram that shows some of the basic adpositions in Vrkhazhian:
Image
Image Ӯсцьӣ (Onschen) [ CWS ]
Image Šat Wərxažu (Vrkhazhian) [ WIKI | CWS ]

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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by kiwikami » 25 Sep 2018 21:12

DesEsseintes wrote:
08 Sep 2018 16:59
Blackfoot meets Pawnee and Alál?
[:D]

That Pathfinder campaign conlang has a passive voice now, and some more particles, and a large collection of prepositions; I do believe I've been successful in making it familiar enough for the English-speaking players to not feel alienated by it, while also entirely incomprehensible unless one is particularly good at picking out cognates. It's not really a Germanic conlang, just loanword-heavy (being, in-universe, a sort of poorly-designed Fantasy Esperanto), but the players should be able to look at it and think "oh, yes, I see how this was once upon a time sort of related to English".

I finally have a verb agreement/pronoun chart, so that's something.

Image

I've come to realize that the alignment isn't in fact nominative-accusative, but rather nominative-absolutive. Marked nominative on nouns is mostly gone, though; it only really shows up in one of the Y/N question constructions (A Focht Bhúrm sech? Did the fox see the worm?). There's a developing tendency for left-dislocation in those constructions (Focht ammát Bhúrm sech? The fox, did it see the worm?) where the subject is also marked.

I wonder if one could get it so that you see the marked nominative only in downward-entailing contexts. This could lead to a separate noun form for the subjects of negative statements and questions, among other things. That would be interesting.
Edit: Substituted a string instrument for a French interjection.

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J Reggie
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by J Reggie » 26 Sep 2018 03:32

I figured out how to use Excel to convert a string of text in Romanized Mýr into Mýr's abugida. This seems to be the fastest way to write in my conscript.

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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Clio » 28 Sep 2018 23:50

A possible paradigm

Code: Select all

  present		past
  sg.      pl.		sg.	pl.
1 lę̌gmi   lęgmás	lígę	ligmé
2 lę̌kši   lękťé	líks	likťé
3 lę̌kti   lęką̂d	lígd	liką̂d

  perfect		future
  sg.      pl.		sg.	pl.
1 leleká   leligmé	ligǎ	lígamas
2 lelektá  lelikťé	lígiz	lígete
3 leleké   lelikêr	lígid	lígąd
Niûro nCora
Getic: longum Getico murmur in ore fuit
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