What did you accomplish today?

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Salmoneus
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Salmoneus » 26 Feb 2019 02:12

*sigh of exhaustion*

I finished writing my review of (/introduction to) the Caelica of Fulke Greville.

If you're in the market for a ridiculously long piece about a relatively obscure (but great, but difficult) Elizabethan/Jacobean poet, you can find that review on my blog.

But seriously, that was exhausting, even just posting the damn thing. Now if only wordpress actually posted what it showed you in the editing screen. [I accept that differences in column width mean it gets some things wrong in terms of positioning and line breaks. but it would be nice if the lines at least STARTED in the right place - instead, some indents work and some don't, and some spaces are kept and some are deleted.]

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elemtilas
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by elemtilas » 26 Feb 2019 02:55

Salmoneus wrote:
26 Feb 2019 02:12
*sigh of exhaustion*

I finished writing my review of (/introduction to) the Caelica of Fulke Greville.

If you're in the market for a ridiculously long piece about a relatively obscure (but great, but difficult) Elizabethan/Jacobean poet, you can find that review on my blog.

But seriously, that was exhausting, even just posting the damn thing. Now if only wordpress actually posted what it showed you in the editing screen. [I accept that differences in column width mean it gets some things wrong in terms of positioning and line breaks. but it would be nice if the lines at least STARTED in the right place - instead, some indents work and some don't, and some spaces are kept and some are deleted.]
Well, I have to say: first of all, the formatting looks okay to me --- at least in my browser Wordpress didn't commit any horrific butchery on your work. Secondly, and more importantly, you gave me a good (and well needed!) laugh. I shall not soon forget Greville being the thorn bush among the literary flowers! Am so far only a third of the way through --- a very interesting read!

Ælfwine
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Ælfwine » 02 Mar 2019 00:16

Slowly expanding Crimean Goth's vocab. Some new words include:

азънс or azens /ˈazəns/ˑ [*azaniz] "Autumn,"

швӣн or schwīn /ˈʃviːn/ [*swīną] "pig"

кӣнс or kīns /ˈkiːns/ [*kwēniz] "woman"

марс or mars /ˈmars/ [*marhaz] "horse"

and likewise мартс or marts /ˈmarts/ [Vulgar Latin > Greek *mártios] "March"

:got: :con:
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Lambuzhao
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Lambuzhao » 02 Mar 2019 07:10

Ælfwine wrote:
02 Mar 2019 00:16
Slowly expanding Crimean Goth's vocab. Some new words include:

and likewise мартс or marts /ˈmarts/ [Vulgar Latin > Greek *mártios] "March"

:got: :con:
Certainly, month and day names got a lot of the old Romance-copypasta treatment across non-Romance European langs.
There is an attested precedent (cf. Skeireins) for Gothic adopting Latin month names ( e.g. Naubaimbair), though, so far, it's a pretty much hapax legomenon affair.

I humbly suggest to check this out:

http://www.odinismo.com/forum/viewtopic ... 3139fe234e

Towards the end of Hoen's post, the author gives some suggestions as to possible Gothic reconstructions of the older pagan month names based on Anglo-Saxon, Old High German, and to some extent, Old Norse cognates.

I've been using a set of them for my Gothic Calendar dropdown on my Journal template for years.

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Lambuzhao
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Lambuzhao » 02 Mar 2019 07:19

on another note,


Overhearing some Spanish speakers chatting in a Post Office line (I Post Office, therefore I cue… :roll: ) so i tried some on the spot translations.

"No hay nada" [->] Nyek nuwdoa NEG=be<PRS>3SG NEG.REL.INAN.ABL.SG

"Que Dios te bendiga" [->] Gē Levehe (‽‽) zorhvitie ihmè CVRB<OPT> god<SG>VOC CAUS.holy.become<OPT> 2SG.OBJ

And I was like "VOCATIVE" ? For a 3rd person non-Imperative subject?? [o.O]

SO, after some thought and some more waiting in the Post Office cue of no return, I immediately decided to make the Vocative Case the de rigueur case for the subject for not only 2nd person Imperatives, but also 3rd person Imperatives, Hortatory Subjunctives, and Volitive Optatives of Wishing. I mean, even though it's not direct address, when I imperate3, or hortate, or volite, the subject is receiving a lot of extra attention in those instances.…


Fortunately, in Serbo-Croatian epic poetry, there is a precedent that I can purchase a toehold. (though I'm surprised that neither Auncient Greek nor Sanskrit, nor even Lithuanian has attestations of this sort of thing. Shame on ye, elder IE sistren!)

[:P]
Last edited by Lambuzhao on 02 Mar 2019 07:25, edited 2 times in total.

Ælfwine
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Ælfwine » 02 Mar 2019 07:21

Lambuzhao wrote:
02 Mar 2019 07:10
Ælfwine wrote:
02 Mar 2019 00:16
Slowly expanding Crimean Goth's vocab. Some new words include:

and likewise мартс or marts /ˈmarts/ [Vulgar Latin > Greek *mártios] "March"

:got: :con:
Certainly, month and day names got a lot of the old Romance-copypasta treatment across non-Romance European langs.
There is an attested precedent (cf. Skeireins) for Gothic adopting Latin month names ( e.g. Naubaimbair), though, so far, it's a pretty much hapax legomenon affair.

I humbly suggest to check this out:

http://www.odinismo.com/forum/viewtopic ... 3139fe234e

Towards the end of Hoen's post, the author gives some suggestions as to possible Gothic reconstructions of the older pagan month names based on Anglo-Saxon, Old High German, and to some extent, Old Norse cognates.

I've been using a set of them for my Gothic Calendar dropdown on my Journal template for years.
I am not entirely convinced that CG would use pagan words for calender months when i.e. Tatar hasn't. nonetheless I'll check it out. Thanks Lam.
My Blog
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Crimean Gothic — A Gothic language spoken in Crimea (duh)
Pelsodian — A Romance language spoken around Lake Balaton
Jezik Panoski — A Slavic language spoken in the same area
An unnamed Semitic language spoken in the Caucus.

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Lambuzhao
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Lambuzhao » 02 Mar 2019 07:30

Ælfwine wrote:
02 Mar 2019 07:21
Lambuzhao wrote:
02 Mar 2019 07:10
Ælfwine wrote:
02 Mar 2019 00:16
Slowly expanding Crimean Goth's vocab. Some new words include:

and likewise мартс or marts /ˈmarts/ [Vulgar Latin > Greek *mártios] "March"

:got: :con:
Certainly, month and day names got a lot of the old Romance-copypasta treatment across non-Romance European langs.
There is an attested precedent (cf. Skeireins) for Gothic adopting Latin month names ( e.g. Naubaimbair), though, so far, it's a pretty much hapax legomenon affair.

I humbly suggest to check this out:

http://www.odinismo.com/forum/viewtopic ... 3139fe234e

Towards the end of Hoen's post, the author gives some suggestions as to possible Gothic reconstructions of the older pagan month names based on Anglo-Saxon, Old High German, and to some extent, Old Norse cognates.

I've been using a set of them for my Gothic Calendar dropdown on my Journal template for years.
I am not entirely convinced that CG would use pagan words for calender months when i.e. Tatar hasn't. nonetheless I'll check it out. Thanks Lam.
I completely understand. It's a question of survival. Mod :eng: has only Yule and Lent, and possibly Easter, as survivals, but none are actual month names.

But do check it out. It may give you an idea for names of festivals or mayhap 'seasons' (i.e. periods of time à la Yuletide, Lententide, Eastertide, etc).

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elemtilas
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by elemtilas » 02 Mar 2019 07:49

Lambuzhao wrote:
02 Mar 2019 07:19
on another note,


Overhearing some Spanish speakers chatting in a Post Office line (I Post Office, therefore I cue… :roll: ) so i tried some on the spot translations.

"No hay nada" [->] Nyek nuwdoa NEG=be<PRS>3SG NEG.REL.INAN.ABL.SG

"Que Dios te bendiga" [->] Gē Levehe (‽‽) zorhvitie ihmè CVRB<OPT> god<SG>VOC CAUS.holy.become<OPT> 2SG.OBJ

And I was like "VOCATIVE" ? For a 3rd person non-Imperative subject?? [o.O]

SO, after some thought and some more waiting in the Post Office cue of no return, I immediately decided to make the Vocative Case the de rigueur case for the subject for not only 2nd person Imperatives, but also 3rd person Imperatives, Hortatory Subjunctives, and Volitive Optatives of Wishing. I mean, even though it's not direct address, when I imperate3, or hortate, or volite, the subject is receiving a lot of extra attention in those instances.…


Fortunately, in Serbo-Croatian epic poetry, there is a precedent that I can purchase a toehold. (though I'm surprised that neither Auncient Greek nor Sanskrit, nor even Lithuanian has attestations of this sort of thing. Shame on ye, elder IE sistren!)

[:P]
Very nicely done!

I always thought the vocative got away with doing rather too little in language. In addition to the use you've put it to, the Queranarran vocative is used referentially in ordinary indicatives, replacing the ergative or accusative/absolutive case, when the agent is known and her Name is spoken.

en harcu versen didi Inac talcarhrtas; Inac petted the dog.

ACC-dog RECENT.PAST-VOC-Inac pet

vs

en harcu versen we nimanye talcarhrtas: the girl petted the dog.

ACC-dog RECENT.PAST-ERG-girl pet

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Lambuzhao
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Lambuzhao » 02 Mar 2019 09:01

Muito interesante, Elem!
:mrgreen:

Ælfwine
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Ælfwine » 02 Mar 2019 17:48

Lambuzhao wrote:
02 Mar 2019 07:30
Ælfwine wrote:
02 Mar 2019 07:21
Lambuzhao wrote:
02 Mar 2019 07:10
Ælfwine wrote:
02 Mar 2019 00:16
Slowly expanding Crimean Goth's vocab. Some new words include:

and likewise мартс or marts /ˈmarts/ [Vulgar Latin > Greek *mártios] "March"

:got: :con:
Certainly, month and day names got a lot of the old Romance-copypasta treatment across non-Romance European langs.
There is an attested precedent (cf. Skeireins) for Gothic adopting Latin month names ( e.g. Naubaimbair), though, so far, it's a pretty much hapax legomenon affair.

I humbly suggest to check this out:

http://www.odinismo.com/forum/viewtopic ... 3139fe234e

Towards the end of Hoen's post, the author gives some suggestions as to possible Gothic reconstructions of the older pagan month names based on Anglo-Saxon, Old High German, and to some extent, Old Norse cognates.

I've been using a set of them for my Gothic Calendar dropdown on my Journal template for years.
I am not entirely convinced that CG would use pagan words for calender months when i.e. Tatar hasn't. nonetheless I'll check it out. Thanks Lam.
I completely understand. It's a question of survival. Mod :eng: has only Yule and Lent, and possibly Easter, as survivals, but none are actual month names.

But do check it out. It may give you an idea for names of festivals or mayhap 'seasons' (i.e. periods of time à la Yuletide, Lententide, Eastertide, etc).
You are right about that. So far the word for autumn derives differently from most of PGmc, same etymology as BG "asans," while most other Germanic languages use a variation of "harvest."

Funnily, the outcome for Biblical Gothic Naubaimbair is November /'nov@mb@r/, nearly the same as English!
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Crimean Gothic — A Gothic language spoken in Crimea (duh)
Pelsodian — A Romance language spoken around Lake Balaton
Jezik Panoski — A Slavic language spoken in the same area
An unnamed Semitic language spoken in the Caucus.

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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by shimobaatar » 04 Mar 2019 02:45

Ælfwine wrote:
02 Mar 2019 00:16
азънс or azens /ˈazəns/ˑ [*azaniz] "Autumn,"
Looking good. I like this word in particular; it's always nice to see words for my favorite time of year.
Interesting.

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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by felipesnark » 04 Mar 2019 03:13

I've been working on Denkurian's verb system. It is a bit more analytic than my typical conlangs, although that said, there are still 10 synthetic TAM forms!

Here's what I've come up with:

Progressive (‘to be X-ing’): “be” + present adjectival participle
baloth + PRST.PCP
Bat hunonke. I am eating.

Perfect (‘to have X-ed’): “be” + past adjectival participle
baloth + PST.PCP
Bat huhununke. I have eaten.

Prospective (‘to be about to X’): “be” + future adjectival participle
baloth + FUT.PCP
Bat hunosanke. I am about to eat.

Recent perfect (‘to have just X-ed’): “come” + “from” + gerund in the dative
mevaloth pesh + GER.DAT
Mevat pesh hunonod. I just ate./I have just eaten.

Habitual (‘to usually/normally do X’): “hold” + “at” + gerund in the accusative
pageloth gum + GER.ACC
Paget gum hunonos. I usually eat.
Papajot gum hunonos. I used to eat.
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by LinguoFranco » 04 Mar 2019 18:51

I’ve started work on an analytic language. I got irritated with my lack of conlanging progress and have nothing to show anyone, so I think an analytic language might be good to make just to do something different from the synthetic languages I like to create.

I have tried making analytic languages in the past and quickly grew bored of them, but this time I actually intend to get further with it. This one started out as a synthetic languages like all the others, but I changed my mind and decided to make it an isolating language.

There are inflections, but only a few, and are marked with inflectional prefixes, while suffixes are used for derivation. I might change this and use register tones for inflection, instead.

It’s going to be topic-prominent, but for now it’s just a non pro-drop SVO language until I work out the syntax some more.

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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Nortaneous » 05 Mar 2019 07:11

Wrote a few lines of a bad Hlu adaptation of the epic poem about the founding of the empire they live in, which in the original language is called the Vtsznxmqye Pvpchqpye Zzxzzyx.

/úsə̂ɴmāɴjə̄ pùtjwàjə̄ dzə̂nî/

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eldin raigmore
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by eldin raigmore » 07 Mar 2019 03:17

Nortaneous wrote:
05 Mar 2019 07:11
... Vtsznxmqye Pvpchqpye Zzxzzyx.
/úsə̂ɴmāɴjə̄ pùtjwàjə̄ dzə̂nî/
Is Mxyzptlk a common name in your conculture?

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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Nortaneous » 07 Mar 2019 08:58

eldin raigmore wrote:
07 Mar 2019 03:17
Nortaneous wrote:
05 Mar 2019 07:11
... Vtsznxmqye Pvpchqpye Zzxzzyx.
/úsə̂ɴmāɴjə̄ pùtjwàjə̄ dzə̂nî/
Is Mxyzptlk a common name in your conculture?
That isn't a possible word. Mx has to be one syllable (/mu31/), so the next syllable has to be either yz or yzp (/jə33/ or /jə11/) - but this would have to be a dialectal form, since the standard has completely neutralized the mid vowel contrasts, so all occurrences of /jə/ are written (y)e. In this context, it has to be yzp, since pt- isn't a licit initial cluster. So the next syllable would have to be tlk, but -k isn't a valid tone letter. There is phonetic syllabic l, but it can't co-occur with an initial t- (since it's underlying /li/ and syllables are C(j)(w)V(n)), and there's no vowel. The closest you could get is something like Mxyeptzlx /mun31jə11tə33li31/, which is pretty far off.

If the written form looks different from the phonemic form, that's because he orthography is phonetic rather than phonemic - that'd actually be pronounced [m31je11tə33l31]. (And the first example is [v55sə̃31mɒ̃33je33 pβʷ11tɕɒ11je23 dzə31ndz31].)

tl;dr no

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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Khemehekis » 11 Mar 2019 07:40

eldin raigmore wrote:
24 Feb 2019 01:43
Khemehekis wrote:
29 Jan 2019 07:25
... made me think of the Oasis song "Wonderwall", which brought to mind the line "The fire in your heart is out". I then added these:

to put out, to extinguish (a cigarette)
to put out, to extinguish (a match)
to put out, to extinguish (a fire)

I've had "to light, to ignite" for these three situations in the LCV for several years now. I'm amazed it took so long before I added the opposite of the concept. ...
Which kind of match? The kind a matchmaker (a yenta) makes?
No, the kind with phosphorus that can start a fire.
Also; how do you say “put the cat out”?
And would your addressee say the equivalent of “I didn’t even know it was on fire!”?
In Kankonian, for one, to put out a match or cigarette or fire is brezekh. To put out the cat is adess, which can also mean "to take out", as in "take out the garbage". And to put out an eye is psabank.

Putting out the cat is not "core" enough a concept, though, to go in the LCV.
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My Kankonian-English dictionary: 60,137 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Hālian » 11 Mar 2019 08:14

I added the following words. Um… that's about it. I hate being indecisive and a perfectionist and unable to come up with ideas when I have a way to write them down. :<

lílitāi n., f., anim. nomad (i.e. someone who studies the psionic discipline known as psychoportation)
łiktan n., n., inan. bread
utuē n., f., abst. the sky
ýtegu n., m., inan. book
ňabjū n., m., inan. moon
mīpiral n., n., abst. family
niđa n., f., anim. drinkable water
ēitařa n., f., anim. seeress
itiþay n., m., anim. maid; butler
ōmau n., m., anim. medium (supernatural)
col n., n., inan. fence

Even this list of words makes me feel bad because to me it screams “HĀLIAN YOU CAN'T EVEN COME UP WITH A CONSISTENT ÆSTHETIC IN A SINGLE FUCKING LANGUAGE YOU SUCK ASS GO COMMIT SUDOKU ALREADY”.
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Khemehekis » 11 Mar 2019 08:39

Hālian wrote:
11 Mar 2019 08:14
me feel bad because to me it screams “HĀLIAN YOU CAN'T EVEN COME UP WITH A CONSISTENT ÆSTHETIC IN A SINGLE FUCKING LANGUAGE YOU SUCK ASS GO COMMIT SUDOKU ALREADY”.
Sudoku?

I believe you mean seppuku.
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Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 60,137 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Lao Kou » 11 Mar 2019 09:56

Hālian wrote:
11 Mar 2019 08:14
I added the following words. Um… that's about it. I hate being indecisive and a perfectionist and unable to come up with ideas when I have a way to write them down. :<

lílitāi n., f., anim. nomad (i.e. someone who studies the psionic discipline known as psychoportation)
łiktan n., n., inan. bread
utuē n., f., abst. the sky
ýtegu n., m., inan. book
ňabjū n., m., inan. moon
mīpiral n., n., abst. family
niđa n., f., anim. drinkable water
ēitařa n., f., anim. seeress
itiþay n., m., anim. maid; butler
ōmau n., m., anim. medium (supernatural)
col n., n., inan. fence

Even this list of words makes me feel bad because to me it screams “HĀLIAN YOU CAN'T EVEN COME UP WITH A CONSISTENT ÆSTHETIC IN A SINGLE FUCKING LANGUAGE YOU SUCK ASS GO COMMIT SUDOKU ALREADY”.
I don't think the purpose of this devised vocabulary list is to make one feel bad or incite one to perform ritual sudoku or seppuku. It's a compendium. a springboard. Languages, as collaborative, living exercises, by their nature, are not perfect. Nor the ones designed by one (watch people rag all over Esperanto et alia).

Perfect? If we achieved it, we could just fold our hands and go home. But still we strive. Whether we paint, compose, investigate, or conlang. So sally forth,
道可道,非常道
名可名,非常名

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