Page 564 of 569

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 28 Jan 2019 23:32
by eldin raigmore
bbbourq wrote:
27 Jan 2019 20:49
.... I started developing my second conlang, Dhakhsh [ðæxʃ], an analytic, SOV language that is written with a RTL, vertical script. You can see my progress here. ....
Every time I try, Twitter tells me “Something went wrong. Try again.”

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 29 Jan 2019 00:51
by bbbourq
eldin raigmore wrote:
28 Jan 2019 23:32
Every time I try, Twitter tells me “Something went wrong. Try again.”
Interesting. Try this: Go to my Twitter profile and look through my tweets. You will see both Lortho and Dhakhsh entries. That should solve the issue.

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 29 Jan 2019 07:07
by eldin raigmore
bbbourq wrote:
29 Jan 2019 00:51
eldin raigmore wrote:
28 Jan 2019 23:32
Every time I try, Twitter tells me “Something went wrong. Try again.”
Interesting. Try this: Go to my Twitter profile and look through my tweets. You will see both Lortho and Dhakhsh entries. That should solve the issue.
Yes! Impressive!
My father was a calligrapher, and my brother is one too.
(I’m not. ☹️)

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 29 Jan 2019 07:25
by Khemehekis
Today I added the following entries to the Landau Core Vocabulary under Verbs of Physical Aggression:

to blind (temporarily)
to blind (permanently)

Adding those made me think of the Oasis song "Wonderwall", which brought to mind the line "The fire in your heart is out". I then added these:

to put out, to extinguish (a cigarette)
to put out, to extinguish (a match)
to put out, to extinguish (a fire)

I've had "to light, to ignite" for these three situations in the LCV for several years now. I'm amazed it took so long before I added the opposite of the concept.

I also added a word to the Foods section in Part V:

muffin

Such an everyday food, and yet it's been missing for so long.

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 29 Jan 2019 08:19
by Ælfwine
Developed a tentative orthography for my Crim. Gothic:

Aa – Aа
Bb – Бб
Dd – Дд
Ee – Ээ
Ff – Фф
Gg – Гг
Hh – Һһ (loanwords only)
Ii – Ии
Kk – Кк
Ll – Лл
Mm – Мм
Nn – Нн
Oo – Оо
Pp – Пп
Rr – Рр
Ss – Сс
Tt – Тт
Uu/Ww – Уу
Vv – Вв
Zz – Зз
Þþ – Ѳѳ

Long vowels and consonants are doubled (so "brenna" is <брэнна>).

Misc:
ch – Хх
sch – Шш
ja – я
jo – ё
ju – ю

ѳа уорд "the word"
скютэн or шютэн "to shoot"

Subject to change, of course. I may need a consistent way to represent schwa.

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 29 Jan 2019 08:31
by Khemehekis
Oh cool, I've never seen a Germanic language written with the Cyrillic alphabet before!

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 02 Feb 2019 12:19
by Keenir
Thought up a little parable/exercise to work on during my upcoming vacation,,,
Spoiler:
Ahagat is a culture hero representing urban life.
'Boaati is a culture hero representing nomadism.

the Parable of Superiority:
On the calendar, there are days of the Pig and days of the Boar. For, it is known and it is held, that when a pig goes feral, it becomes a boar.

On the calendar, there are days of the Horse and days of the Camel. For, it is held, that when a horse goes feral, it becomes a camel.

(there are other day-groups; another time)

Ahagat asserted that the horse is superior to the camel. He used only spoken words to do so.

'Boaati stated that Ahagat was misinformed. 'Boaati held up The Transformations, about the changes from feral to unferal and unferal to feral.

Ahagat smiled and pointed to 'Boaati's essay. "What is this?" He asked this of the essay written in Ahagat's script.

Now 'Boaati smile and held out his copy of On Learning. "What is this?" he asked of the book which tells of angelic instruction to humans, a book written in Ahagat's script.
That is the End of the Parable Of Superiority.

conlang notes:
* "it is known" and "it is held" are evidentials which tag along after the If-Then Causality modifier.
* "days of the ___" are noun phrases which have a single cartouche-word in the script.
* "to do so" is a single word(?)

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 06 Feb 2019 05:26
by Khemehekis
BEFORE:

The connective "id" is used to mean that an action is "done to" something. It is used after a gerund to connect it to its object:

Adhashar id goshaniya en hethet stoern.
clean done_to toilet PST task difficult
Cleaning the toilet was a difficult task.

Ovai id zikheth id ventas dyu meyez hazias ad tzareimin is.
watch done_to shoot done_to animal-PL by person-PL make-PRS to angry 1s
Watching people shoot animals makes me angry.

NEW:

Passive object-phrases like the latter example must have a verb. Instead of "seeing him happy", say "seeing him be happy":

Em id e gweimo dyu ar soerzas is.
see done_to BE sad by 2s pain-PRS 1s
Seeing you sad pains me.

(Note that a second "id" is not required after the verb "e".)

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 11 Feb 2019 04:22
by Ælfwine
Khemehekis wrote:
29 Jan 2019 08:31
Oh cool, I've never seen a Germanic language written with the Cyrillic alphabet before!
Yes. I figured the historical background of the language called for it. Furthermore, upon accessing Stearn's work, who proposed a phonology for Crimean Gothic, I've taken it and see if I could introduce a Cyrillic spelling into it.

The vowels:

/i iː u uː/ <и ии у уу>
/e eː ə o oː/ <э ээ ? о оо>
/a (aː)/ <а аа>

The corpus does not have /aː/ as a phoneme, but nonetheless I've included it as I believe loanwords such as vāzer [ˈvaː.zər], "market" from Middle Persian could reintroduce it. I am somewhat unsure how to cyrillicize schwa. Schwa only occurs in unstressed syllables, usually as the second syllable of a two syllable word.

The consonants:

/m n/ <м н>
/p b t d k (g)/ <п б т д к ґ>
/f v θ s (z) ʃ x ɣ/ <ф в ѳ с з ш х г>
/r l j/ <р л ?>

Per Stearns, CG did not have the phonemes /g/ or /z/. Much like Ukrainian, /g/ would be reintroduced into the language from Western European loanwords. I believe /z/ too, would be introduced through loanwords like zebre [ˈze.brə], though its possible it may not have the functional load required.

The status of /j/ is uncertain, Stearns says the language likely had it as a phoneme, but it doesn't appear anywhere in the corpus (with his alterations.)

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 11 Feb 2019 12:32
by Frislander
Ælfwine wrote:
11 Feb 2019 04:22
I am somewhat unsure how to cyrillicize schwa. Schwa only occurs in unstressed syllables, usually as the second syllable of a two syllable word.
You have a couple of choices. You could follow the Circassian example and use Yery <ы>, or you could follow the examples set by some Uralic languages like Komi and use ӧ. Alternatively schwa is available as a letter in Cyrillic.

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 11 Feb 2019 13:52
by shimobaatar
Ælfwine wrote:
11 Feb 2019 04:22
Crimean Gothic
Always nice to see something Gothic-based. I like the phonology so far.

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 13 Feb 2019 07:33
by LinguistCat
While on a family trip, I found some hentaigana that I could use for Nyango to write certain sounds I wanted to derive from Old Japanese and Middle Japanese. Just want to double check that there aren't ones I like more if I get the chance (could only see some hentaigana symbols that I would have been interested in.)

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 13 Feb 2019 18:55
by Ælfwine
shimobaatar wrote:
11 Feb 2019 13:52
Ælfwine wrote:
11 Feb 2019 04:22
Crimean Gothic
Always nice to see something Gothic-based. I like the phonology so far.
Thank you!
Frislander wrote:
11 Feb 2019 12:32
Ælfwine wrote:
11 Feb 2019 04:22
I am somewhat unsure how to cyrillicize schwa. Schwa only occurs in unstressed syllables, usually as the second syllable of a two syllable word.
You have a couple of choices. You could follow the Circassian example and use Yery <ы>, or you could follow the examples set by some Uralic languages like Komi and use ӧ. Alternatively schwa is available as a letter in Cyrillic.
I have gone with the schwa for now, however, it doesn't seem to correlate to schwa in some of the languages that use it.

I think I might add two additional phonemes, /ø/ and /y/ from /eu/ and /iu/ respectively. They'll be romanized as <ö> and <ü> respectively, although I need cyrillic letters for them too

beudaną > böden (German bieten)
biudizi > büdize? (c.f. dorbize?)

:wat:

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 13 Feb 2019 19:19
by Ahzoh
I expanded the demonstrative pronouns, now they behave even more like personal pronouns:
https://www.frathwiki.com/Vrkhazhian#De ... e_Pronouns

ṣəhuñwinak šuddəm.
[sʼəɦuŋwinɑk çudːəm]
DEM.PROX-DIR-MASC-PL-GEN ACT.PRES-speak.to\ACT-PL
These ones must speak to each other.

šuñwin tšada vərxažšəya šuddəm.
[çuŋwin tçɑdɑ βərxɑçːəjɑ çudːəm]
2m.NOM-DIR-PL ACC-mouth-FEM.SG vrkhazhian-ADJ-FEM.SG ACT.PRES-speak\ACT-PL
You all must speak Vrkhazhian.

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 13 Feb 2019 19:25
by Omzinesý
Ælfwine wrote:
13 Feb 2019 18:55
Frislander wrote:
11 Feb 2019 12:32
Ælfwine wrote:
11 Feb 2019 04:22
I am somewhat unsure how to cyrillicize schwa. Schwa only occurs in unstressed syllables, usually as the second syllable of a two syllable word.
You have a couple of choices. You could follow the Circassian example and use Yery <ы>, or you could follow the examples set by some Uralic languages like Komi and use ӧ. Alternatively schwa is available as a letter in Cyrillic.
I have gone with the schwa for now, however, it doesn't seem to correlate to schwa in some of the languages that use it.

I think I might add two additional phonemes, /ø/ and /y/ from /eu/ and /iu/ respectively. They'll be romanized as <ö> and <ü> respectively, although I need cyrillic letters for them too

beudaną > böden (German bieten)
biudizi > büdize? (c.f. dorbize?)

:wat:
I've also considered that and my usual choice for schwa is the hard sign <ъ>, which is used in South-Slavic. Cyrillic letters are much better for non-front unrounded vowels than the Romance ones.

For Cyrillic /ø/ and /y/, <ÿ> and <ö> are the simple solution.
If you want to get ancient, Cyrillic ypsilon <ѵ> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Izhitsa could be used for /y/.
You can also use ligatures, say <ıy> and <ıo> or <ю> respectively.

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 13 Feb 2019 20:27
by Ælfwine
Omzinesý wrote:
13 Feb 2019 19:25
Ælfwine wrote:
13 Feb 2019 18:55
Frislander wrote:
11 Feb 2019 12:32
Ælfwine wrote:
11 Feb 2019 04:22
I am somewhat unsure how to cyrillicize schwa. Schwa only occurs in unstressed syllables, usually as the second syllable of a two syllable word.
You have a couple of choices. You could follow the Circassian example and use Yery <ы>, or you could follow the examples set by some Uralic languages like Komi and use ӧ. Alternatively schwa is available as a letter in Cyrillic.
I have gone with the schwa for now, however, it doesn't seem to correlate to schwa in some of the languages that use it.

I think I might add two additional phonemes, /ø/ and /y/ from /eu/ and /iu/ respectively. They'll be romanized as <ö> and <ü> respectively, although I need cyrillic letters for them too

beudaną > böden (German bieten)
biudizi > büdize? (c.f. dorbize?)

:wat:
I've also considered that and my usual choice for schwa is the hard sign <ъ>, which is used in South-Slavic. Cyrillic letters are much better for non-front unrounded vowels than the Romance ones.

For Cyrillic /ø/ and /y/, <ÿ> and <ö> are the simple solution.
If you want to get ancient, Cyrillic ypsilon <ѵ> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Izhitsa could be used for /y/.
You can also use ligatures, say <ıy> and <ıo> or <ю> respectively.
For /ø/ I was thinking of the barred <ө>, but this might be too close to fita <ѳ>. Crimean Tatar, my closest neighbor, uses <ё> and <ю> respectively, which might fit better with the etymology.

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 13 Feb 2019 23:36
by Keenir
during my vacation of the last few days, I realized a major misunderstanding I'd been laboring under...

I had thought Gothic was a Germanic language, and compared its known words to various Germanic words; and had toyed with having a Welsh-like initial mutation.

...and just recently, I learned (Nat Geo History magazines) that Gothic is on the Celtic branch of IE, not the Germanic.

*facepalms*

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 13 Feb 2019 23:48
by Ælfwine
Keenir wrote:
13 Feb 2019 23:36
during my vacation of the last few days, I realized a major misunderstanding I'd been laboring under...

I had thought Gothic was a Germanic language, and compared its known words to various Germanic words; and had toyed with having a Welsh-like initial mutation.

...and just recently, I learned (Nat Geo History magazines) that Gothic is on the Celtic branch of IE, not the Germanic.

*facepalms*
I've never heard of a "Welsh-like initial mutation" in Gothic.

That does sound silly, regardless.

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 14 Feb 2019 05:08
by Keenir
Ælfwine wrote:
13 Feb 2019 23:48
Keenir wrote:
13 Feb 2019 23:36
during my vacation of the last few days, I realized a major misunderstanding I'd been laboring under...

I had thought Gothic was a Germanic language, and compared its known words to various Germanic words; and had toyed with having a Welsh-like initial mutation.

...and just recently, I learned (Nat Geo History magazines) that Gothic is on the Celtic branch of IE, not the Germanic.

*facepalms*
I've never heard of a "Welsh-like initial mutation" in Gothic.

That does sound silly, regardless.
sorry, I meant that was something I had thought to add on, as part of my version/continuation of Gothic.

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 14 Feb 2019 08:37
by Creyeditor
I am a bit confused. Gothic is an East Germanic language. It is not a Celtic language. Or is the facepalm because Nat Geo History magazine did such an obvious mistake.