German/Yiddish <z>/<tz>

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yangfiretiger121
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German/Yiddish <z>/<tz>

Post by yangfiretiger121 » 07 Jul 2019 16:25

Having taken two years of German in high/secondary school, I know that German's <z> is [t͡s]. Yet, I see German and/or Yiddish names, such as Katzinger and Spitz, spelt <tz>. Is this the European spelling or, simply, an Anglicization so English-speakers pronounce the name correctly?
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Creyeditor
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Re: German/Yiddish <z>/<tz>

Post by Creyeditor » 07 Jul 2019 19:21

German (and Yiddish?) double letters to show that the preceding vowel is short. For <z> however, the doubled version is <tz> insted of <zz>, i.e. in words like <spitz> the <i> is short.
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yangfiretiger121
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Re: German/Yiddish <z>/<tz>

Post by yangfiretiger121 » 07 Jul 2019 19:25

I'd forgotten that, Crey. Thanks for reminding me.
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Sumelic
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Re: German/Yiddish <z>/<tz>

Post by Sumelic » 07 Jul 2019 23:34

Aside from being used to mark a short vowel, double consonants are used in the spelling of some German names after a consonant, a context where they signify nothing special about the pronunciation. E.g. Schwartz, Hertz, Planck, Bismarck are pronounced just the same as if they were spelled "schwarz, herz, plank, bismark".

Porphyrogenitos
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Re: German/Yiddish <z>/<tz>

Post by Porphyrogenitos » 09 Jul 2019 03:13

Yiddish doesn't have contrastive vowel length. There is some variation in the Latin-based Yiddish orthography, but it uniformly uses either <tz> or <ts> to represent /ts/, never plain <z>. So German 'dance' is tanz, but the word in Yiddish is transcribed as tantz or sometimes tants.

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