False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by shimobaatar » 17 Jul 2016 22:35

k1234567890y wrote: English f**k and Cantonese (pronunced as /fɐt˨/, it sounds similar to English f**k) "buddha"(a Hong Kong comic exploited this and invented a jocular phrase "我佛你", which literally can be interpreted as "I make you a buddha", but it can also be interpreted as "I f**k you" considering the pronunciation of "佛" in Cantonese...)
Reminds me of signs like this:
Spoiler:
Image

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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Frislander » 18 Jul 2016 00:13

shimobaatar wrote:
k1234567890y wrote: English f**k and Cantonese (pronunced as /fɐt˨/, it sounds similar to English f**k) "buddha"(a Hong Kong comic exploited this and invented a jocular phrase "我佛你", which literally can be interpreted as "I make you a buddha", but it can also be interpreted as "I f**k you" considering the pronunciation of "佛" in Cantonese...)
Reminds me of signs like this:
Spoiler:
Image
Actually, thinking about it, the 'Phat' will probably be a Sino-Vietnamese word, judging from the shapes of both that and the Cantonese equivalent, so the 'problems' might actually be related!

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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by shimobaatar » 18 Jul 2016 01:31

Frislander wrote:Actually, thinking about it, the 'Phat' will probably be a Sino-Vietnamese word, judging from the shapes of both that and the Cantonese equivalent, so the 'problems' might actually be related!
I wouldn't be surprised, but I personally don't know enough to confirm this.

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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by qwed117 » 18 Jul 2016 01:59

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ph%E1%BA%ADt
Yep, Frislander is right, at least on the first word. I can't find an etymology for the second though. It means "happy buddha" or "lucky buddha".
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Lao Kou » 18 Jul 2016 04:02

k1234567890y wrote:English -ed "past tense suffix"(maybe using the Standard German -te here is better) and Japanese -た "plain perfective suffix"
Well then [}:D],

Hungarian -ta, 3rd person singular, definite, past, back vowel harmony:

adta - s/he gave it
várta - s/he waited for it
hozta - s/he brought it

For correspondence to the German -te, the same, but with front vowel harmony:

fejte - s/he milked it
ölte - s/he killed it
építette - s/he built it
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k1234567890y
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by k1234567890y » 18 Jul 2016 04:37

Russian Yuri(a male given name) and Japanese Yuri(a female given name)

English harbinger and (standard) German Harbiner(one that lives in Harbin)
shimobaatar wrote:
k1234567890y wrote: English f**k and Cantonese (pronunced as /fɐt˨/, it sounds similar to English f**k) "buddha"(a Hong Kong comic exploited this and invented a jocular phrase "我佛你", which literally can be interpreted as "I make you a buddha", but it can also be interpreted as "I f**k you" considering the pronunciation of "佛" in Cantonese...)
Reminds me of signs like this:
Spoiler:
Image
lol
Lao Kou wrote:
k1234567890y wrote:English -ed "past tense suffix"(maybe using the Standard German -te here is better) and Japanese -た "plain perfective suffix"
Well then [}:D],

Hungarian -ta, 3rd person singular, definite, past, back vowel harmony:

adta - s/he gave it
várta - s/he waited for it
hozta - s/he brought it

For correspondence to the German -te, the same, but with front vowel harmony:

fejte - s/he milked it
ölte - s/he killed it
építette - s/he built it
nice comparison (:
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Lao Kou » 18 Jul 2016 05:02

Image
Ich bin ein Harbiner.
道可道,非常道
名可名,非常名

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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by k1234567890y » 18 Jul 2016 06:26

Lao Kou wrote:Image
Ich bin ein Harbiner.
XDD sehr gut lol
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Lao Kou » 18 Jul 2016 07:50

qwed117 wrote:https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ph%E1%BA%ADt
Yep, Frislander is right, at least on the first word. I can't find an etymology for the second though. It means "happy buddha" or "lucky buddha".
For the second, I first found this: https://fr.wiktionary.org/wiki/ph%C3%BAc, but better is this: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E7%A6%8F

To the extent that shimo's sign with the big-tummied Buddha:
Spoiler:
Image
visually looks like "(You) fat f*ck",

I've always thought that Cantonese romanized 福 (i.e. "fuk"), more closely resembles the f-bomb visually (and is ubiquitous on store fronts). So Vietnamese "phật phúc" (佛福) romanized à la cantonaise, "fat fuk" is the sight-gag. Pronunciation-wise, maybe it'd have to be read by a Scot or Welshman or something to work ("ya fut fook").

Personally, as an English speaker, I'd think "我福你", "I happy you" would be the go-to pun choice. While those Cantonese final consonants are unreleased, /fɐt˨/ for "f*ck" just ain't doing it for me, but I guess for Chinese audiences, they sound close enough to be amusing.

Of course, for pronunciation, if Cantonese had "fak" (/fɐk/) (which I don't believe it does, at least in the "standard"), that'd be like hitting the trifecta. [:)]
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k1234567890y
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by k1234567890y » 18 Jul 2016 10:02

Lao Kou wrote:
qwed117 wrote:https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ph%E1%BA%ADt
Yep, Frislander is right, at least on the first word. I can't find an etymology for the second though. It means "happy buddha" or "lucky buddha".
For the second, I first found this: https://fr.wiktionary.org/wiki/ph%C3%BAc, but better is this: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E7%A6%8F

To the extent that shimo's sign with the big-tummied Buddha:
Spoiler:
Image
visually looks like "(You) fat f*ck",

I've always thought that Cantonese romanized 福 (i.e. "fuk"), more closely resembles the f-bomb visually (and is ubiquitous on store fronts). So Vietnamese "phật phúc" (佛福) romanized à la cantonaise, "fat fuk" is the sight-gag. Pronunciation-wise, maybe it'd have to be read by a Scot or Welshman or something to work ("ya fut fook").

Personally, as an English speaker, I'd think "我福你", "I happy you" would be the go-to pun choice. While those Cantonese final consonants are unreleased, /fɐt˨/ for "f*ck" just ain't doing it for me, but I guess for Chinese audiences, they sound close enough to be amusing.

Of course, for pronunciation, if Cantonese had "fak" (/fɐk/) (which I don't believe it does, at least in the "standard"), that'd be like hitting the trifecta. [:)]
nice suggestion and XD
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by WeepingElf » 24 Jul 2016 13:45

Having been to Amsterdam last weekend reminds me of this one:

:eng: coffee shop ~ :nld: coffeeshop 'hashish den'
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by GrandPiano » 24 Jul 2016 17:34

Lao Kou wrote:Of course, for pronunciation, if Cantonese had "fak" (/fɐk/) (which I don't believe it does, at least in the "standard"), that'd be like hitting the trifecta. [:)]
Standard Cantonese does have "dik" [tɪk̚].
:eng: - Native
:chn: - B2
:esp: - A2
:jpn: - A2

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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Lao Kou » 25 Jul 2016 14:05

GrandPiano wrote:
Lao Kou wrote:Of course, for pronunciation, if Cantonese had "fak" (/fɐk/) (which I don't believe it does, at least in the "standard"), that'd be like hitting the trifecta. [:)]
Standard Cantonese does have "dik" [tɪk̚].
It also has "sak" (/sɐk/), so /sɐk tɪk/. I don't know if Cantonese speakers will get that one off the bat, since it's not as omnipresent in American movies the way "fuk" is, quelling the tee-hee-hee factor.
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by k1234567890y » 25 Jul 2016 16:08

I haven't checked if this has been posted yet:

English die, Danish die "to suck, breast milk", Dutch die "that, those", Standard German die (definite article for feminine nouns and plural nouns)
Spoiler:
Image
In Dutch, children curse their mothers to death?
WeepingElf wrote:Having been to Amsterdam last weekend reminds me of this one:

:eng: coffee shop ~ :nld: coffeeshop 'hashish den'
lol XD

How do Dutch people call a coffee shop that sells coffee? (:
GrandPiano wrote: Standard Cantonese does have "dik" [tɪk̚].
XD
Lao Kou wrote: It also has "sak" (/sɐk/), so /sɐk tɪk/. I don't know if Cantonese speakers will get that one off the bat, since it's not as omnipresent in American movies the way "fuk" is, quelling the tee-hee-hee factor.
XDD
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by WeepingElf » 25 Jul 2016 21:07

k1234567890y wrote:
WeepingElf wrote:Having been to Amsterdam last weekend reminds me of this one:

:eng: coffee shop ~ :nld: coffeeshop 'hashish den'
lol XD

How do Dutch people call a coffee shop that sells coffee? (:
I don't know, probably simply koffiewinkel (winkel is Dutch for 'shop').
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Dormouse559 » 25 Jul 2016 21:15

If I had to guess, it's probably "café" or some respelling thereof.

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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by WeepingElf » 26 Jul 2016 13:40

Dormouse559 wrote:If I had to guess, it's probably "café" or some respelling thereof.
Yes, there are various varieties of cafés in the Netherlands.
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by k1234567890y » 26 Jul 2016 14:05

WeepingElf wrote:
I don't know, probably simply koffiewinkel (winkel is Dutch for 'shop').
Dormouse559 wrote:If I had to guess, it's probably "café" or some respelling thereof.
WeepingElf wrote:
Yes, there are various varieties of cafés in the Netherlands.
Thanks for your suggestions! (:
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by HoskhMatriarch » 03 Aug 2016 01:42

:deu: hier - "here" and :fra: hier - "yesterday"
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by qwed117 » 03 Aug 2016 02:56

:esp: todavia "still" ~ :eng: "today"
Spoiler:
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What is made of man will crumble away.

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