Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Tea

A forum for discussing linguistics or just languages in general.
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Adarain
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Re: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Tea

Post by Adarain » 18 Apr 2016 16:55

In Swiss German, meals have different names than in Standard German, and they're all derived from the time of the day:
  • z'Morga (to morning) = breakfast, first thing you eat in the morning
  • z'Nüni (to nine o'clock) = snack some time between breakfast and lunch, a sandwich or so
  • z'Mittag (to noon=mid-day) = lunch, most important meal of the day, generally
  • z'Viari (to four o'clock) = "tea", afternoon snack. Generally refers to something like a fruit and some cookies.
  • z'Nacht (to night) = dinner. In my family this is usually just bread, nothing warm, except on sundays where we skip lunch altogether and have a bigger early dinner. Either way, the name is the same
Note that z'nüni and z'viari don't necesarily have to happen at exactly 9AM or 4AM, those names are pretty established regardless of when you have them. In fact, my nine-o-clock snack usually happens at 10 AM.
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Re: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Tea

Post by Alomar » 27 Apr 2016 21:42

Another American here (from Ohio).

Breakfast - 7 to 10 AM; typical foods: cereal, eggs, bacon, potatoes, pancakes, coffee, milk, juice, fruit. Generally I eat just a subset of these during the week, but on the weekends a big breakfast might include most of those, and will also happen later in the day ~8 to 11, and possibly make it so I don't eat lunch that day.

Lunch and Dinner/Supper - the foods and sizes of the meals are interchangeable for me. I can eat sandwiches, salads or full entrees for both. Although, sandwiches are a bit more likely to happen for lunch.
Lunch happens 11:30 to 2 pm for me

Dinner and supper are interchangeable in terms of the types of food that you'd have at them, but for me it's mainly who you're eating with. Supper is just the nuclear family, and dinner is extended family, or something more formal.

Although, for my wife's family (a higher social class than my own), they only use dinner, and so I've started to use that term exclusively. Even though in my heart, I mean supper.
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All4Ɇn
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Re: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Tea

Post by All4Ɇn » 12 Jun 2016 11:44

For me growing up in northern Florida the basic three meals are always breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Supper is a variant of dinner used mostly by older people. On Sunday however the second meal of the day is always called dinner and never lunch or supper. The third meal on Sunday is usually called supper by older people but doesn't really have a name among younger people and is usually just called dinner by them if a name is necessary.
Last edited by All4Ɇn on 12 Jun 2016 23:12, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Tea

Post by qwed117 » 12 Jun 2016 17:47

(New Jerseyan, Highschooler)

Breakfast - (4:00 AM ~ 11:00 AM) Small meal eaten generally 2 or 3 hours before lunch. Can be skipped

Brunch - (10:00 AM ~ 11:00 AM) A medium-large meal, generally of the same foods as breakfast, but in lieu of both breakfast and lunch

Lunch - (11:00 AM ~ 2:00 PM) A medium meal eaten around midday

Snack - (2:00 PM ~ 6:00 PM) A small to medium meal eaten generally during the "post-work" period

Linner - (2:00 PM ~ 6:00 PM) A large meal eaten in lieu of lunch and dinner

Dinner - (5:30 PM ~ 11:00 PM) A large meal eaten in the evening. Occasionally termed "supper", especially by pretentious or old people

Post-Linner Snack - (7:00 PM ~ 10:00 PM) A small meal eaten only after Linner

Midnight Snack - (9:00 PM ~ 2:00 PM) A small meal, usually consisting of a light snack and copious amounts of water. Used to stave off hunger until sleeping occurs
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Sglod
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Re: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Tea

Post by Sglod » 13 Jun 2016 13:09

In my area of Britain we have what is called 'bait'. It means a small, often packed, midday meal that is eaten between working. It is mostly farmers that call it this, most just call it lunch.

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Frislander
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Re: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Tea

Post by Frislander » 13 Jun 2016 16:16

Sglod wrote:In my area of Britain we have what is called 'bait'. It means a small, often packed, midday meal that is eaten between working. It is mostly farmers that call it this, most just call it lunch.
I think I've heard it from one of my schoolteachers referring to my packed lunch.

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Re: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Tea

Post by shimobaatar » 14 Jun 2016 03:59

For reference, I'm an American from Pennsylvania, and I just finished high school.

No matter what time of day I actually eat them, my first meal is "breakfast", my second is "lunch", and my third is "dinner". Depending on the day, "breakfast" might be at noon, "lunch" might be at 6pm, and "dinner" might be near midnight, for example. That isn't typical, though.

Anything other than those three large meals would be referred to as a "snack". On school days, I would have a little bit to eat at school and call it "lunch", since that's what the period we were given was called, but then I'd have a more substantial "lunch" a few hours later once I'd gotten home. I've only heard the term "brunch" used jokingly, at least in person.

I typically associate the word "supper" (instead of "dinner") with the American South and/or Midwest, and it also carries some vague connotations of the speaker being elderly and/or the context being religious.

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Re: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Tea

Post by clawgrip » 25 Jun 2016 03:15

Japanese is really pretty boring when it comes to naming meals. There's
朝ご飯 asagohan "morning meal/rice"
昼ご飯 hirugohan "noon/daytime meal" (or just お昼 ohiru "noon/daytime")
おやつ oyatsu "snack" (usually around 3 pm)
夜ご飯 yorugohan "night meal" (or 晩ご飯 bangohan "evening meal")

There are also the less conversational terms 朝食 chōshoku/昼食 chūshoku/夕食 yūshoku for breakfast/lunch/dinner

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GrandPiano
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Re: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Tea

Post by GrandPiano » 25 Jun 2016 04:18

clawgrip wrote:Japanese is really pretty boring when it comes to naming meals. There's
朝ご飯 asagohan "morning meal/rice"
昼ご飯 hirugohan "noon/daytime meal" (or just お昼 ohiru "noon/daytime")
おやつ oyatsu "snack" (usually around 3 pm)
夜ご飯 yorugohan "night meal" (or 晩ご飯 bangohan "evening meal")

There are also the less conversational terms 朝食 chōshoku/昼食 chūshoku/夕食 yūshoku for breakfast/lunch/dinner
Interestingly, Mandarin does a similar thing:
早饭 zǎofàn [t͡sɑʊ̯˨˩fan˥˩] (traditional: 早飯) "early meal" (饭/飯 fàn can also mean "rice", but it clearly means "meal" here)
午饭 wǔfàn [wu˨˩fan˥˩] (tr. 午飯) "noon meal" (or 中饭 zhōngfàn [ʈ͡ʂʊŋ˥fan˥˩] (tr. 中飯) "middle meal")
晚饭 wǎnfàn [wan˨˩fan˥˩] (tr. 晚飯) "late meal"

饭/飯 fàn in all these cases can be replaced with 餐 cān [t͡sʰan˥], also meaning "meal", for a (I think) slightly more formal equivalent, although 中餐 usually means "Chinese food" (where 中 is short for 中国 zhōngguó [ʈ͡ʂʊŋ˥kwɔ˧˥] (tr. 中國) "China", literally "middle country").
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Creyeditor
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Re: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Tea

Post by Creyeditor » 25 Jun 2016 21:14

Indonesian does almost the same:

Makan pagi ("eat morning") is a breakfast, where you usually eat a small portion of nasi goreng (fried rice) or something similar that is not really considered a meal, but more than a snack. Sometimes people also eat sweet pastry, e.g. donuts or sweet bread. It is eaten at sunrise (6:00 a.m.) or before going to work/school. Another term is sarapan, which somehow looks like a loan word from Arabic.

Makan siang ("eat noon") is the main meal of the day. You usually eat rice with meat/fish/tofu and vegetables. It often starts around noon but may extend till late afternoon.

Makan malam ("eat night") is a small snack that is eaten after sunset. It often consists of gorengan (fry-ABSTR) e.g. fried bananas or some other kind of "big" snack, like bakso meat balls with noodles and broth.

Interestingly, there is are no meals like Makan sore ("afternoon meal") or Makan subu ("midnight meal"). Another term for a short snack with coffe or tea exists only as a verb and is independent of the time of day mengeteh (VBLZ.tea) and mengopi (VBLZ.coffe).

This might be a bit overrepresenting the meal culture in Papua and Jakarta, but it's still very similar to Chinese and Japanese.
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Re: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Tea

Post by jlamonta » 28 Jun 2016 22:36

Dormouse559 wrote:My understanding is that in Belgium, Quebec and Switzerland, the morning meal is "déjeuner", the midday meal is "dîner" and the evening meal is "souper". And in France, "souper" is a light evening meal eaten after the main one (dîner).
I'm on the "Quebec French" side of things (technically I grew up just outside of Quebec, but in the same dialect area) and I can confirm this. Adding in my English too: the morning meal is Fr. "déjeuner" or En. "breakfast", the noontime meal is Fr. "dîner" or En. "lunch", and the evening meal is Fr. "souper" or En. "dinner"/"supper" (both are said with no obvious associations or connotations). "Petit déjeuner" would be a small morning meal! (Jokes aside, though, there's enough dialect contact that we understand the terms used in France and we joke a little when the French version of a program(me) or schedule for an event here uses the France French terms -- it's happened at events meant to highlight local food/drinks before!) "Tea" for me could involve food, but if so it would be more like a light or heavy snack than something that feels like a meal, and it wouldn't seem too weird for it to be at any time of the day.

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