IPA Examples Not Enough Anymore.

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Isfendil
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IPA Examples Not Enough Anymore.

Post by Isfendil » 17 Oct 2016 23:57

Alright, the yorku IPA website (and most other websites that offer listening portions for phonemes) just aren't enough anymore. These demonstrations are monosyllabic and often employ a pattern that just uses the most standard, easy to produce non-schwa vowel that they can muster. Is there anywhere on the internet where we can listen to words or phrases that use specific phonemes? Any website or series of websites that collect them together? A doc full of youtube links? I'm just really tired of not knowing what to aim for whenever I have to produce a back consonant with a front vowel, or what a lateral fricative should sound like, or bloody liquid initial/medial consonant clusters.

Is there anyone who can help?

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GrandPiano
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Re: IPA Examples Not Enough Anymore.

Post by GrandPiano » 18 Oct 2016 00:46

You could find words in other languages that have the phoneme or phoneme sequence you're looking for and use websites like Forvo to find recordings of the words.
:eng: - Native
:chn: - B2
:esp: - A2
:jpn: - A2

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Isfendil
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Re: IPA Examples Not Enough Anymore.

Post by Isfendil » 18 Oct 2016 01:08

GrandPiano wrote:You could find words in other languages that have the phoneme or phoneme sequence you're looking for and use websites like Forvo to find recordings of the words.
Thank you, this is good. Is there no way to look something up by phoneme directly?

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chridd
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Re: IPA Examples Not Enough Anymore.

Post by chridd » 23 Oct 2016 20:07

If you look at the Wikipedia pages for specific phonemes, there's usually a list of languages that have the phoneme, and often some of those have audio samples.
~ chri d. d. /ʧɹɪ.di.di/ (Phonotactics, schmphonotactics) · they (for now, at least) · My conlangs · Searchable Index Diachronica

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