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Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 03 Oct 2019 06:24
by GoshDiggityDangit
k1234567890y wrote:
02 Oct 2019 06:18
English clan and English plant
Nah, really?

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 03 Oct 2019 13:58
by Zekoslav
GoshDiggityDangit wrote:
03 Oct 2019 06:24
k1234567890y wrote:
02 Oct 2019 06:18
English clan and English plant
Nah, really?
It's true! Old Irish had no /p/, and before it ended up common enough in loanwords to be borrowed as it is, it was usually borrowed as /k/.

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 15 Dec 2019 19:49
by Shemtov
:eng: "G-d" "Futile"
Both from PIE *ǵʰew. In Latin it got the meaning "Leaky", and then in Old French "Pointless". In PGrm, it meant "One for whom Libations are poured"

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 18 Jan 2020 16:19
by Xonen
So, according to Aszev's post in another thread, we have:

:lat: cavāre 'excavate', 'hollow out', 'perforate', 'pierce'
:fin: kaveri 'friend', 'buddy'

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 20 Jan 2020 12:45
by Aszev
Xonen wrote:
18 Jan 2020 16:19
So, according to Aszev's post in another thread, we have:

:lat: cavāre 'excavate', 'hollow out', 'perforate', 'pierce'
:fin: kaveri 'friend', 'buddy'
As I understood it, the cognate would be the verb kaveerata, with kaveri being originally unrelated but later affecting the sense of kaveerata, shifting it from 'chat' to 'be friends with'.

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 02 Feb 2020 01:36
by vo1dwalk3r
:eng: worm ~ :ukr: червоний 'red'

Assuming that the PIE roots *kʷŕ̥mis and *wŕ̥mis (both meaning 'worm') are related.

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 04 Feb 2020 07:56
by Pabappa
If so, it wouldn't be the only such pair..... wiktionary also lists kʷerb- and werb- both meaning "to turn, bend".

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 04 Feb 2020 07:57
by Khemehekis
Pabappa wrote:
04 Feb 2020 07:56
If so, it wouldn't be the only such pair..... wiktionary also lists kʷerb- and werb- both meaning "to turn, bend".
It that where the word "swerve" ultimates from?

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 05 Feb 2020 06:31
by Pabappa
Khemehekis wrote:
04 Feb 2020 07:57
Pabappa wrote:
04 Feb 2020 07:56
If so, it wouldn't be the only such pair..... wiktionary also lists kʷerb- and werb- both meaning "to turn, bend".
It that where the word "swerve" ultimates from?
Probably, .... I dont see that particular connection made in wiktionary, but wiktionary lists "swipe" and "wipe" as cognates without explanation (note: you have to go back to the PIE to see them unified, as they were separate in proto-Germanic) ... and interestingly enough the PIE root reconstructed there is ksweybʰ-, so perhaps there is a sporadic process of not just s-mobile but also k-mobile, or at least initial /k/-deletion before /w/. 'Tis a puzzlement.

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 09 Feb 2020 07:07
by eldin raigmore
Are Quebecois “poutine” and Acadian “boudin” cognates?
(They certainly don’t have the same meaning!)

—————

Somebody thinks they’re also cognate with English “pudding”. Are they?

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 09 Feb 2020 17:53
by sangi39
eldin raigmore wrote:
09 Feb 2020 07:07
Are Quebecois “poutine” and Acadian “boudin” cognates?
(They certainly don’t have the same meaning!)

—————

Somebody thinks they’re also cognate with English “pudding”. Are they?
Apparently, on all counts, possibly yes.

The origin of poutine is unclear, but it looks like most sources agree it probably comes from French pouding ("any dish formed from putting the leftovers of a place such as a bakery together, and mixing them all into one", with the choice "poutine" relating to the "mess" of the dish), from English pudding, originally a kind of sausage, or any mix of meat in an animals stomach (see "haggis" as the "chieftain o' the pudding-race"), itself from French boudin, with the same or similar meaning (now meaning something along the lines of "black pudding"), which is where Acadian boudin comes from.

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 09 Feb 2020 18:33
by eldin raigmore
sangi39 wrote:
09 Feb 2020 17:53
Apparently, on all counts, possibly yes.
Thank you, sangi39!

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 20 Feb 2020 05:25
by Shemtov
:eng: "Yak" :zho: 羊 yáng "sheep"
The :zho: is from PST*g-ya(k/ŋ), which meant "domestic animals whose hair can be used for cloth", which also gave rise to old :tib: གཡག /gjak/ "Bull Yak", which in some modern Tibetan languages is pronounced /jak/, which was borrowed into European languages.