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Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 07 Aug 2018 18:15
by GrandPiano
:eng: puppy and :eng: puppet

Puppy is likely from Middle French poupée "doll, toy", and puppet is apparently from Middle French poupette, the diminutive of poupée.

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 21 Oct 2018 03:02
by Shemtov
Per the False Cognate thread:
:eng: <what> and <quote>.

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 23 Oct 2018 16:46
by Nortaneous
oh are we doing loanwords now. we can do loanwords

Palauan bangderang 'flag' ~ Latin funda 'sling'
Palauan barb 'valve' ~ Old Armenian gełdz 'yew tree'
Palauan kusarang 'spoon' ~ English cochlea
Palauan hon 'book' ~ Korean jabonjuui 'capitalism'

Tocharian B tmāne 'myriad' ~ banzai ~ Tyumen (city in Russia)
Tocharian B onkolma 'elephant' ~ Zhuang ngaz 'ivory' (probably)

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 03 Nov 2018 13:19
by Birdlang
Portuguese bandeira, Spanish bandera —> Indonesian/Malay/Javanese bendera, Palauan bangderang, Tagalog bandila/bandera, Cebuano bandila, Sundanese bandera, English banner.
Sanskrit kalapati —> Sundanese japati, Indonesian and Javanese merpati, Tagalog kalapati, Cebuano salampati, other cognates in other Malayo-Polynesian languages, Lithuanian balandis (?), Hindi/Sindhi/Urdu kabūtar.

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 14 Dec 2018 08:10
by Shemtov
:eng: Yonder :deu: Jener "That" from PGm *jainaz.
And some say that *jainaz is related to the Latin root that gave us the "Identical/Identity" family, from PIE *i "DEM"

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 12 Jan 2019 23:55
by GrandPiano
If Latin fūnus comes from the PIE root *dʰew-, then "death" and "funeral" are related.

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 15 Jan 2019 23:10
by Ser
GrandPiano wrote:
12 Jan 2019 23:55
If Latin fūnus comes from the PIE root *dʰew-, then "death" and "funeral" are related.
Along similar lines:
Latin figere 'to pierce; fasten' ~ Spanish hincarse 'to kneel down' ~ English dig

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 27 Apr 2019 18:15
by Pabappa
how about :fra: Chevrolet and :fra: cabriolet? Two words for the same object from the same ultimate root word, meaning "goat", yet they acquired their modern meanings in two very different ways, one a descriptive noun for transportation and the other a surname of a man who just by chance happened to work manufacturing early automobiles.

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/cabriolet#French
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/chevrolet#French

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 28 Apr 2019 23:44
by Shemtov
:esp: Aceite "oil" :isr: /zajit/ "olive"
Apparently, the Arabic cognate narrowed in Andalusian to all oils, and was borrowed into :esp:. It's especially surprising when my :esp: book used it for "motor oil"

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 29 Apr 2019 16:23
by WeepingElf
Well, 'oil' has undergone the same kind of shift in English.

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 09 May 2019 15:34
by CivilixXXX
:pol: Król (king) and ziarno (grain)
PL król < PS korljь < OHG Karl< PG *karilaz < PIE *ǵerh > PIE ǵr̥h₂nóm > PS zьrno > PL ziarno

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 20 May 2019 14:11
by Sglod
:eng: Hell, :eng: :esp: cojones, and :lat: :eng: cilium. All ultimately from PIE *ḱel- 'to cover'. That one got me right in the cojones!

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 21 May 2019 18:05
by Pabappa
Sglod wrote:
20 May 2019 14:11
:eng: Hell, :eng: :esp: cojones, and :lat: :eng: cilium. All ultimately from PIE *ḱel- 'to cover'. That one got me right in the cojones!
nice. I used to believe that :esp: cielo "Heaven" was related, but it's not true.

_______
:eng: orphan = :eng: robot , because they both traditionally work hard with no pay. Also :deu: Arbeit "work".

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 07 Jul 2019 02:14
by k1234567890y
Chinese (pronounciation in Middle Chinese: /miɪt̚/) "honey", English mead and Russian медведь "bear"(and its cognates in other Slavic languages), all of them contain a part that is from Proto-Indo-European *médʰu (“mead, honey”).

The Chinese word is an ancient borrowing from Tocharian, which is from Proto-Tocharian *ḿət(ə), from Proto-Indo-European *médʰu (“mead, honey”).

The English word is an inhereted word from proto-Indo-European. The English word is from Old English medu, from Proto-Germanic *meduz, from Proto-Indo-European *médʰu (“mead, honey”).

The Russian word is from Proto-Slavic *medvědь, which is a compound of Proto-Slavic *medъ (“honey”) +‎ *(j)ěsti (“to eat”), and the Proto-Slavic word *medъ is from Proto-Balto-Slavic *medús, from Proto-Indo-European *médʰu (“mead, honey”).

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 01 Sep 2019 15:18
by Dormouse559
:eng: coriander and cilantro

Okay, this pair probably isn't surprising for that many people, but I had a big "Aha!" moment when a cooking show mentioned they come from the same plant.

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 02 Sep 2019 04:17
by eldin raigmore
Dormouse559 wrote:
01 Sep 2019 15:18
:eng: coriander and cilantro
Okay, this pair probably isn't surprising for that many people, but I had a big "Aha!" moment when a cooking show mentioned they come from the same plant.
How are they cognates?

Are arugula and “rocket lettuce” cognates?

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 02 Sep 2019 04:43
by Dormouse559
eldin raigmore wrote:
02 Sep 2019 04:17
Dormouse559 wrote:
01 Sep 2019 15:18
:eng: coriander and cilantro
[…]
How are they cognates?
They both come from Latin coriandrum; the former through Anglo-Norman/French, the latter through Spanish. When the show mentioned the botanical connection, I began to notice the similar consonants and vowels and decided to investigate.

eldin raigmore wrote:Are arugula and “rocket lettuce” cognates?
I don't know. Are they?

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 03 Sep 2019 15:25
by Xonen
Dormouse559 wrote:
02 Sep 2019 04:43
eldin raigmore wrote:Are arugula and “rocket lettuce” cognates?
I don't know. Are they?
According to Wiktionary, yes.

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 04 Sep 2019 22:04
by Frislander
Of course there's all the cognates thrown up by the Plains Algonquian languages like Arapaho and Cheyenne, for instance:

Ar bíí "buffalo" ~ Ch mehe ~ Cree môswa "moose"
Ar henéécee "buffalo bull" ~ Ch hotóá‘e ~ Cree iyâpêw "buck"
Ar nóubee "fly" ~ Cree sakimêw
Ar cóóx "Comanche" ~ Ch notse "foreigner" ~ Cree pwât "Sioux"
Ar hébes "beaver" ~ Ch hóma‘e ~ Cree amisk

Re: Surprising cognates

Posted: 02 Oct 2019 06:18
by k1234567890y
English clan and English plant