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Today I learned ...

Posted: 12 Jun 2018 23:54
by eldin raigmore
Today I learned that the feminine given name “Netra” means “leader” or “guide” or “eye” in Smskrta.

Re: Today I learned ...

Posted: 15 Jun 2018 12:48
by Lao Kou
One can always make the actual dessert, pêche Melba, which would be, of course, peshmelbalats.

But it appears that on Géarthtörs, peshmelbs is almost a state of mind. At its essence, it's an ice cream flavor, with tiers of ice cream flavor ((maybe) artificial) peach-vanilla-raspberry, like harlequin, or some sort of mélange of flavored ice cream with chunks of peach and raspberries therein. Purists decry it. Nevertheless, the term is a selling magnet. There is peshmelbs ice cream (an ultra cheap dessert would be scooping this onto cookies or microwaved cake), peshmelbs yoghurt, peshmelbs creamsicles, peshmelbs cream candies, peshmelbs milkshakes. and good Lord, peshmelbs bubble tea.

I learned this today.

There may be some paint color called peshmelbs, I shudder to think.

Re: Today I learned ...

Posted: 15 Jun 2018 17:54
by Dormouse559
Lao Kou wrote:
15 Jun 2018 12:48
One can always make the actual dessert, pêche Melba, which would be, of course, peshmelbalats.

But it appears that on Géarthtörs, peshmelbs is almost a state of mind. At its essence, it's an ice cream flavor, with tiers of ice cream flavor ((maybe) artificial) peach-vanilla-raspberry, like harlequin, or some sort of mélange of flavored ice cream with chunks of peach and raspberries therein. Purists decry it. Nevertheless, the term is a selling magnet. There is peshmelbs ice cream (an ultra cheap dessert would be scooping this onto cookies or microwaved cake), peshmelbs yoghurt, peshmelbs creamsicles, peshmelbs cream candies, peshmelbs milkshakes. and good Lord, peshmelbs bubble tea.

I learned this today.

There may be some paint color called peshmelbs, I shudder to think.
That sounds good. Did you learn why peshmelbs has so insinuated itself into the Géarthtörs zeitgeist?

I'm not imaginative enough to think of a single paint color that unites peaches and raspberries, but peshmelbs strikes me as inspiration for a delectable lazure wall treatment.

Re: Today I learned ...

Posted: 15 Jun 2018 21:32
by Lao Kou
Dormouse559 wrote:
15 Jun 2018 17:54
Lao Kou wrote:
15 Jun 2018 12:48

But it appears that on Géarthtörs, peshmelbs is almost a state of mind. At its essence, it's an ice cream flavor, with tiers of ice cream flavor ((maybe) artificial) peach-vanilla-raspberry, like harlequin, or some sort of mélange of flavored ice cream with chunks of peach and raspberries therein. Purists decry it. Nevertheless, the term is a selling magnet. There is peshmelbs ice cream (an ultra cheap dessert would be scooping this onto cookies or microwaved cake), peshmelbs yoghurt, peshmelbs creamsicles, peshmelbs cream candies, peshmelbs milkshakes. and good Lord, peshmelbs bubble tea.

There may be some paint color called peshmelbs, I shudder to think.
That sounds good. Did you learn why peshmelbs has so insinuated itself into the Géarthtörs zeitgeist?
I wouldn't call it Zeitgeist, like 70s avocado kitchenware, cause it's here to stay. Perhaps, like "celadon", the term just caught on. Why is harlequin "harlequin"? Or spumoni? ) (Or Florida in coral and tourquoise?) I should've mentioned, as a cheap dessert tartin' it up to be "elegant", lady fingers would be involved.

But let's face it, a peshmelbs ice cream cone dipped in (intercede New England English: you may call 'em "sprinkles" (please!), but we rightly call them "jimmies", and they're chocolate) jimmies would be a pleasant summer treat.
Dormouse559 wrote:
15 Jun 2018 17:54
I'm not imaginative enough to think of a single paint color that unites peaches and raspberries, but peshmelbs strikes me as inspiration for a delectable lazure wall treatment.
Frankly, I imagined something a paint-color-namer might have called it "orange sorbet" (with a soupçon of yellow but not all the way to "canteloupe" -- toward red, "watermelon"), but the "lazure" (see, I learned something) treatment may be the way to work this.

Re: Today I learned ...

Posted: 27 Jun 2018 22:51
by eldin raigmore
Today I learned I might be demisapiosexual.

Re: Today I learned ...

Posted: 30 Jul 2018 23:09
by eldin raigmore
Today I learned that AEGIS is an acronym for
Artificially Expanded Genetic Information System.

Re: Today I learned ...

Posted: 31 Jul 2018 03:19
by qwed117
eldin raigmore wrote:
30 Jul 2018 23:09
Today I learned that AEGIS is an acronym for
Artificially Expanded Genetic Information System.
I think it's a backronym, bc aegis is the shield of Zeus and Athena in Greek mythology (it has Medusa's head on the opposite side!)

Re: Today I learned ...

Posted: 31 Jul 2018 14:53
by eldin raigmore
Thanks!
I was aware that Aegis was the name of Athena’s shield, but I had forgotten the term “backronym”.

I’m not sure “backronym” fits in this case.
Isn’t a “backronym” something like claiming “FORD” stands for “Fix Or Repair Daily”?

Anyway, to be sure whether or not AEGIS is a backronym, we’d need to consult the word-coiners.

Re: Today I learned ...

Posted: 02 Aug 2018 09:21
by clawgrip
They're nearly the same thing, i.e. a preexisting word that gets turned into an acronym later on. The difference between these two is that the Ford acronym describes Ford itself, while the AEGIS acronym does not actually describe Zeus's shield. Not sure which counts as an actual backronym.

Then there are ones like Kiss ← Knights in Satan's Service, where the backronym is erroneously claimed by some to be the actual etymology.

Re: Today I learned ...

Posted: 21 Sep 2018 16:34
by k1234567890y
I just learnt that the exchange between mid and high vowels(i.e. /e o/ becomes /i u/ but /i u/ becomes /e o/ in the same language) can occur in natual languages, it has occured in Bashkir and Tatar.

Re: Today I learned ...

Posted: 23 Sep 2018 01:29
by eldin raigmore
k1234567890y wrote:
21 Sep 2018 16:34
I just learnt that the exchange between mid and high vowels(i.e. /e o/ becomes /i u/ but /i u/ becomes /e o/ in the same language) can occur in natual languages, it has occured in Bashkir and Tatar.
That’s interesting! Could you tell us more? Maybe on another thread, in say the L&L subforum?

Re: Today I learned ...

Posted: 23 Sep 2018 04:20
by k1234567890y
eldin raigmore wrote:
23 Sep 2018 01:29
k1234567890y wrote:
21 Sep 2018 16:34
I just learnt that the exchange between mid and high vowels(i.e. /e o/ becomes /i u/ but /i u/ becomes /e o/ in the same language) can occur in natual languages, it has occured in Bashkir and Tatar.
That’s interesting! Could you tell us more? Maybe on another thread, in say the L&L subforum?
I just found out that when reading the Wikipedia article about the Bashkir language...I am not really sure about the mechanism

I guess it could be a chain shift with /e o/ > /ie uo/ > /i u/ and /i u/ > /e o/ though

Re: Today I learned ...

Posted: 05 Oct 2018 06:49
by Nortaneous
An important detail is that, in Bashkir, unrounded mid vowels are short and prone to elision.

I don't know if there's a consensus, but what probably happened is that the original mid/high contrast was reanalyzed as a tense/lax or long/short contrast, at which point the new tense/long vowels started to spread throughout the vowel triangle, and the new lax/short vowels centralized.

Re: Today I learned ...

Posted: 04 Nov 2018 18:03
by KaiTheHomoSapien
Today I learned that the reconstructed PIE word for wolf, "wlkʷos" should have given Latin *volquus and Greek *alpos. But instead we get lupus and lykos, so there must have been some other processes involved (Latin may have borrowed from Sabellic). Interesting :)

I think "volquus" is a better word than "lupus". I wish it were the real Latin word for wolf. Then the Italian word would be "volco". Oh well, can't have everything [:P]

Re: Today I learned ...

Posted: 05 Nov 2018 19:35
by eldin raigmore
KaiTheHomoSapien wrote:
04 Nov 2018 18:03
Today I learned that the reconstructed PIE word for wolf, "wlkʷos" should have given Latin *volquus and Greek *alpos. But instead we get lupus and lykos, so there must have been some other processes involved (Latin may have borrowed from Sabellic). Interesting :)

I think "volquus" is a better word than "lupus". I wish it were the real Latin word for wolf. Then the Italian word would be "volco". Oh well, can't have everything [:P]
In a conlang, you can just pretend that what you wish happened, did happen! Wanna go for it?

Re: Today I learned ...

Posted: 06 Nov 2018 13:54
by shimobaatar
KaiTheHomoSapien wrote:
04 Nov 2018 18:03
Today I learned that the reconstructed PIE word for wolf, "wlkʷos" should have given Latin *volquus and Greek *alpos. But instead we get lupus and lykos, so there must have been some other processes involved (Latin may have borrowed from Sabellic). Interesting :)

I think "volquus" is a better word than "lupus". I wish it were the real Latin word for wolf. Then the Italian word would be "volco". Oh well, can't have everything [:P]
Oh, wow, I didn't know that either! Very interesting! I agree that I prefer the aesthetic of "volquus".

Re: Today I learned ...

Posted: 07 Nov 2018 10:22
by Zekoslav
shimobaatar wrote:
06 Nov 2018 13:54
KaiTheHomoSapien wrote:
04 Nov 2018 18:03
Today I learned that the reconstructed PIE word for wolf, "wlkʷos" should have given Latin *volquus and Greek *alpos. But instead we get lupus and lykos, so there must have been some other processes involved (Latin may have borrowed from Sabellic). Interesting :)

I think "volquus" is a better word than "lupus". I wish it were the real Latin word for wolf. Then the Italian word would be "volco". Oh well, can't have everything [:P]
Oh, wow, I didn't know that either! Very interesting! I agree that I prefer the aesthetic of "volquus".
In Classical Latin, it would have actually been "vulquus" (or "VVLQVVS", in capital letters), which is aesthetically quite different - Old Latin /o/ becomes /u/ in Classical Latin if followed by a dark "l". It would still give Italian "volco", though.

Re: Today I learned ...

Posted: 07 Nov 2018 13:32
by shimobaatar
Zekoslav wrote:
07 Nov 2018 10:22
In Classical Latin, it would have actually been "vulquus" (or "VVLQVVS", in capital letters), which is aesthetically quite different - Old Latin /o/ becomes /u/ in Classical Latin if followed by a dark "l". It would still give Italian "volco", though.
Oh, hmm, I thought that just happened in medial syllables. But when I tried finding an example of initial "volC-", though, most of the words I found were specified as alternate forms of words beginning with "vulC-" (for example, "volgāritās" and "volpēs" instead of "vulgāritās" and "vulpēs").

In any case, I personally don't think "vulquus" is all that different from "volquus".

Re: Today I learned ...

Posted: 07 Nov 2018 14:18
by Zekoslav
It does look funky in capital letters [:D] !

Re: Today I learned ...

Posted: 07 Nov 2018 19:56
by shimobaatar
Zekoslav wrote:
07 Nov 2018 14:18
It does look funky in capital letters [:D] !
Oh yeah, if you're talking about that, I definitely agree.