Conlang accents

A forum for translations, translation challenges etc. Good place to increase your conlang's vocabulary.
protondonor
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Re: Conlang accents

Post by protondonor » 08 Sep 2016 15:34

Isfendil wrote:Also, I usually don't have [ð] and/or [θ] in a conlang unless they're allophones or they're a big part of the family (my nascent semlangs come to mind). I was always led to believe they were weird, uncommon sounds that liked to dissapear. Was I wrong? And are they really that common, given that an individual conlanger's languages may be in their own conworld and not ours, and therefore not add to our world's census total of languages with those phonemes?
Judging by WALS and PHOIBLE, you're not wrong. I also like to avoid them where possible.

Anyway, here's two conlangs with interdental fricatives or approximants*:

:con: Kaimen Keling:
[o̞:l xju:man bi:jiŋs ar bo̞:rn fri: and i:kwal in digniti: and raits | θei ar e̞ndaud wiθ ri:san and kansje̞ns and sjud akt to̞:rds wan anaðe̞r in a spirit af braðe̞rxud]

:con: Yuka:
[äɬ hijumän̪̥ b̰ḭjḭŋks äɾ̥ b̰o̞̰ɾn̪̥ pri än̪d̪ ikβ̞äɬ in̪ t̪iɣ̞n̪it̪i än̪d̪ ɾäits | ð̞e̞ äɾ̥ e̞n̪d̪aut̪ β̞iθ ɾisän̪̥ än̪d̪ kän̪ʃe̞n̪s än̪d̪ ʃut̪ äkt̪ t̪o̞ɾts β̞än̪̥ än̪äð̞e̞ɾ̥ in̪̥ e̞ e̞spiɾit̪ äɸ b̰ɾä̰ð̞e̞̰ɾxṵt̪]

* - but there's a well-motivated a posteriori reason for them to be there! I promise!
Last edited by protondonor on 09 Sep 2016 20:23, edited 1 time in total.
Kaimen Keling: Uralic goes Germanic
Kolyma Ainu: Ainu language spoken in mainland Siberia
Wetokwa: a priori, spoken in a Death Valley-like environment, former speedlang
Mañi: a Ngerupic language inspired by Oto-Manguean, Cariban, and Mataco-Guaicuruan

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Isfendil
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Re: Conlang accents

Post by Isfendil » 08 Sep 2016 20:54

Hey, it's okay. Spirantization happens...

My question though, what do umlauts mean in IPA? They confuse me something fierce. Also what is the patakh-like symbol beneath some of the vowels?

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Egerius
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Re: Conlang accents

Post by Egerius » 08 Sep 2016 21:18

< ̈> = centralization, < ̰> = creaky voice
Languages of Rodentèrra: Buonavallese, Saselvan Argemontese; Wīlandisċ Taulkeisch; More on the road.
Conlang embryo of TELES: Proto-Avesto-Umbric ~> Proto-Umbric
New blog: http://argentiusbonavalensis.tumblr.com

shimobaatar
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Re: Conlang accents

Post by shimobaatar » 08 Sep 2016 21:19

Isfendil wrote:My question though, what do umlauts mean in IPA? They confuse me something fierce. Also what is the patakh-like symbol beneath some of the vowels?
Two dots above a vowel in the IPA signify that that vowel is central/centralized. The symbol /a/ could technically represent either a front or central low unrounded vowel. If you want or need to specify that it's central, however, the symbol /ä/ is used.

I had to Google "patakh". It looks like there are two diacritics you could be referring to, unless I'm missing some others. The diacritic resembling a small <T> underneath a consonant or vowel is a lowering diacritic. /β ð/ can represent either fricatives or approximants, but /β̞ ð̞/ are specifically approximants. /e o/ can represent either high-mid or mid vowels, but /e̞ o̞/ are specifically mid. The tilde below a consonant or vowel represents creaky voice.

Hopefully this clears things up.
Edit: Looks like someone beat me to it.

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Isfendil
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Re: Conlang accents

Post by Isfendil » 08 Sep 2016 23:14

Actually they only beat you to the umlaut. A patakh does not resemble a tilde very closely. Thank you both, though!

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k1234567890y
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Re: Conlang accents

Post by k1234567890y » 11 Feb 2019 19:40

Ame language

Due to the highly restrictive phonotactics, the Ame accent of English would be extremely distorted, more so than that of Japanese, maybe comparable to how Jennifer becomes Kinipela in Hawaiian.

In Ame, there are no distinction between /r/ and /l/; besides, words can't start with the liquid; moreover, there are only four vowels /a e i o/([o] and [ u ] are allophones of /o/) and around 13 consonants, and close syllables or consonant clusters are disallowed, and epenthetic vowels are used to break consonant clusters, coda consonants and initial liquids, and /i/ is the most common epenthetic consonant; also, coronals are palatalized before /i/.

Below is a possible Ame accent of English:

/oɺi çio:mani bi:ŋid͡ʑi a: bo:ni ɸuɺi: eni i:kowaɺi ini d͡ʑiŋinit͡ɕi eni aɺaitoɕi de: a: inidaodo oido iɺi:zani eni koniɕianiɕi eni ɕiodo akito too:d͡ʑi wani anada: ini a sebiɺito oɸu boroda:ɸudo/
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Reyzadren
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Re: Conlang accents

Post by Reyzadren » 11 Feb 2019 22:53

:con: griuskant accent

/'ɔl 'hiumən 'biiŋs 'ar 'bɔrn 'fri 'end 'ikuəl 'in 'digniti 'end 'raits. 'θei 'ar 'endaud 'wiθ 'rizˤən 'end 'kɔnʃiəns 'end 'ʃud 'ek 'tuwərds 'wan 'enaθər 'in 'ə 'spirit 'ɔv 'braθərhud/
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