Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

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Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

Post by shimobaatar » 11 Dec 2019 00:29

Language: Theodish
Word: ydesughtow
IPA: [ˈʔiːdzʊfto]

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Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

Post by spanick » 11 Dec 2019 01:08

shimobaatar wrote:
11 Dec 2019 00:29
Language: Theodish
Word: ydesughtow
IPA: [ˈʔiːdzʊfto]
This is the most alien looking Theidish word I’ve encountered lol. They’re usually so tame.

Is y- a prefix descended from *ga-?

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Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

Post by shimobaatar » 12 Dec 2019 00:53

spanick wrote:
11 Dec 2019 01:08
shimobaatar wrote:
11 Dec 2019 00:29
Language: Theodish
Word: ydesughtow
IPA: [ˈʔiːdzʊfto]
This is the most alien looking Theidish word I’ve encountered lol. They’re usually so tame.

Is y- a prefix descended from *ga-?
Haha, that was definitely my intention (both "words usually looking rather tame/familiar" and "this particular word looking weird").

[cross] y- is not descended from *ga-.

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Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

Post by spanick » 15 Dec 2019 22:10

Is it a noun?

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Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

Post by shimobaatar » 16 Dec 2019 11:17

spanick wrote:
15 Dec 2019 22:10
Is it a noun?
[tick]

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Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

Post by spanick » 17 Dec 2019 02:39

Is it composed of at least three PG descended morphemes?

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Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

Post by shimobaatar » 17 Dec 2019 02:53

spanick wrote:
17 Dec 2019 02:39
Is it composed of at least three PG descended morphemes?
[cross] I would say only 2 identifiable morphemes.

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Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

Post by spanick » 17 Dec 2019 03:23

Is the boundary between yde-sughtow?

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Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

Post by shimobaatar » 23 Dec 2019 04:19

spanick wrote:
17 Dec 2019 03:23
Is the boundary between yde-sughtow?
Oh damn, I'm sorry, I could have sworn I'd responded to this.

It's ydes-ughtow.

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Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

Post by VaptuantaDoi » 23 Dec 2019 04:33

Does ughtow derive from Germanic *unhtwǭ?

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Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

Post by shimobaatar » 24 Dec 2019 05:35

VaptuantaDoi wrote:
23 Dec 2019 04:33
Does ughtow derive from Germanic *unhtwǭ?
[tick]

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Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

Post by VaptuantaDoi » 24 Dec 2019 06:10

Is the whole term Christmas-themed?

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Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

Post by shimobaatar » 24 Dec 2019 16:56

VaptuantaDoi wrote:
24 Dec 2019 06:10
Is the whole term Christmas-themed?
[cross]

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Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

Post by VaptuantaDoi » 24 Dec 2019 22:17

Is the ydes- morpheme a noun?

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Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

Post by shimobaatar » 25 Dec 2019 02:29

VaptuantaDoi wrote:
24 Dec 2019 22:17
Is the ydes- morpheme a noun?
[tick]

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Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

Post by shimobaatar » 26 Dec 2019 20:27

It might help to ignore the y-. It's there because it's present in this word's cognates in some real Germanic languages, but as far as I can tell, it doesn't really mean anything.

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Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

Post by VaptuantaDoi » 26 Dec 2019 21:23

That helps muchly! Does it come from PGmc *dīsiz as in Old English "ides"? If so, does it have the same meaning as the OEng?

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Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

Post by shimobaatar » 27 Dec 2019 02:25

VaptuantaDoi wrote:
26 Dec 2019 21:23
That helps muchly! Does it come from PGmc *dīsiz as in Old English "ides"? If so, does it have the same meaning as the OEng?
[tick] It does! Although it does not have the same meaning as its Old English cognate.

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Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

Post by VaptuantaDoi » 27 Dec 2019 02:33

shimobaatar wrote:
27 Dec 2019 02:25
[tick] It does! Although it does not have the same meaning as its Old English cognate.
Hmm... has the meaning become more specific or less specific?

(If I'm not allowed to ask that, then "has the meaning become less specific?")

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Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

Post by shimobaatar » 27 Dec 2019 03:18

VaptuantaDoi wrote:
27 Dec 2019 02:33
shimobaatar wrote:
27 Dec 2019 02:25
[tick] It does! Although it does not have the same meaning as its Old English cognate.
Hmm... has the meaning become more specific or less specific?

(If I'm not allowed to ask that, then "has the meaning become less specific?")
Hmm, that's tough (although in general I think it's a perfectly fine question to ask here). I think I'd say that the difference has more to do with connotation than specificity.

Also, just to be safe/clear, this is where I'm getting the definition of the Old English word.

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