The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

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Lambuzhao
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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Lambuzhao » 18 Jun 2018 16:41

On the completely other end of the spectrum, I have been going hog-wild with microgreen growing. Although, from when I come from, we called 'em 'sprouts'.

I have already sown, grown and eaten (well my son really devoured these) a windowsill ( ½ windowsill length) container chock full of various radishes: red globe generics, french breakfast, and my fave, icicle radishes. I originally wanted to grow the roots, but we couldn't wait, and frankly, the microgreens are just as peppery-piquant as the actual roots (!!) Plus, apparently, microgreens have 40% more vitamins than the full grown plants. Yumth ahoy! [:P]

I have prepared a second, larger container (full-windowsill size) with more radishes. After three days, they have already started to sprout.
Radishes are super prolific for microgreens! If you want to try something unbelievably easy, reliable, then I recommend growing radishes.

I am also on my second container of dandelion greens. I still have the first. They were all wild picked seed back in the start of May.
Their germination and performance has been, predictantly, weedy. But the second, post-cotyledon leaves are starting to widen out after being fragile and leggy.

I have sown mint seeds. I prolly would have larger more robust plants if I had just waited a couple of weeks into June and burgled some
stem/rhizome cuttings from neighbors' lawns, but I wanted to give them a shot from seed. These plants were the most 'high maintenance' so far.
They took the longest to germinate, and although they are about 30 days old, they are very thready-stemmed. But they are biggering!


I also have sowed onions. I am eating them for the greens, though. I have also water-sprouted and just recently sowed scallion roots. [:)]
I also sowed Asian garlic chives, which my son relishes, but the first round were dud seeds [:S] We'll try again soon!!! [:P]

About three weeks ago, I collected some Purslane (Portulaca oleracea) seedlings. They are holding on, although some kind of scale or maybe fungus
grew through some of the older leaves. I quickly removed the offensive offenders ASAP. They are just now starting to show some secondary growth near the soil line.

I recently collected a bunch ( 1½ gallon ziploc bags full) of curly dock (Rumex crispus) seeds. From some research, they seem to make pretty foolproof microgreens, and are more appetizing than the sour, tough, oxalic-acid laced leaves of mature plants.

Also, some cape gooseberry (Physalis pruinosa) fruits which I had forgotten about from last summer, have started to germinate after doing the wet paper towel + plate in ziploc bag trick. They should be ready to plant very soon (today or tomorrow).

I am also contemplating harvesting/sniggling some Chicory roots. I have always wanted to grow forced-root whitloof. Plus, the high content of inulin in chicory has my diebeetus saying "Go for it!".

This may look nothing remotely to do with conlanging/conworlding. But, it will give me the chance to work on/update/create some more vegetal-vocab for my :con: 's , and exhaustively pouring over a pleroma of recipes and uses for the above to be used with my confolk.

Happy Sowing, Happy Growing, Happy Reaping, Happy Eating!
:mrgreen:

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Dormouse559 » 24 Jun 2018 23:16

The local public TV station was showing "La Bohème", which I'm unfamiliar with, but it was misidentified in the TV listings as "Laurence Olivier- A Life," noting a focus on his post-World War II life. For a little bit I had fun trying to figure out why anyone would make an opera about Laurence Olivier in Italian, and set it post-1945 but with 19th century costuming.

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Khemehekis » 25 Jun 2018 01:15

I've never seen "La Bohème", although I have seen the Animaniacs parody "La Behemoth". I've also heard some of the songs from RENT, which was based on "La Bohème".
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31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Khemehekis » 25 Jun 2018 01:24

I checked, and I do have "Cape gooseberry" (or "poha", as it's called in my neck of the woods) in Kankonian: yadzaliy. However, my Kankonian dictionary gives the scientific name as Physalis peruviana, not P. pruinosa.
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Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 58,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

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Harlan Ellison

Post by eldin raigmore » 29 Jun 2018 11:13

Harlan Ellison died.

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by KaiTheHomoSapien » 30 Jun 2018 21:52

It sure was weird to be driving through Carson City, NV yesterday and see a Lihmelinyan word on a freeway overpass:

Image

(ušewe means "we (both) saw" in Lihmelinyan). Actually this is the Washo name of a particular street in southern Carson City ("Ušeweʔ Wat'a") as this part of the town is in the Washo Indian reservation. It just caught me off guard because that Washo word bears a striking resemblance to one in my conlang [xP]
Hekā laikantan tērkan nepaugazai himnayan!

My conlang: Image Lihmelinyan

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by qwed117 » 03 Jul 2018 02:09

Frislander wrote:
18 May 2018 21:45
qwed117 wrote:
18 May 2018 01:54
I'm having a fun time reading A Tale of Two Cities, and to entertain myself, I imagine all of the characters speaking the :yout: most backwoods British accent (Emily Blunt and Cecily Strong in SNL GBBO)
Ironic you consider these accents as "backwoods" when they're using (very approximate tbf) accents from Leeds-Bradford and Merseyside respectively, among the largest regions of urbanisation in the UK.
It's been a solid 3 months, but I'd just like to say, Yat, Pittsburghese and Yankee are all backwoods accents, no matter what city they came from.
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What is made of man will crumble away.

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Frislander » 03 Jul 2018 11:55

I sometimes feel like I've been deprived a bit by not having ever met any Native Americans, but then if I were to I would have to have grown up in the US, and I'm glad I haven't had to suffer that.

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Lambuzhao » 03 Jul 2018 14:04

Khemehekis wrote:
25 Jun 2018 01:24
I checked, and I do have "Cape gooseberry" (or "poha", as it's called in my neck of the woods) in Kankonian: yadzaliy. However, my Kankonian dictionary gives the scientific name as Physalis peruviana, not P. pruinosa.
Uff. Quite.

I asked some horticultural friends, and they tsked me on that one. 'Cape Gooseberry' or 'Golden Berry' is too frou-frou for our humble
Ground Cherry, or , if you prefer, :us-pa: :deu: Yuddekesche. [;)]

Still mighty tasteable, though. [:P]

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Re: Harlan Ellison

Post by Lambuzhao » 03 Jul 2018 14:08

eldin raigmore wrote:
29 Jun 2018 11:13
Harlan Ellison died.
Lost another good'un. [:'(]

The Death Bird has come round one last time.

Gosh, I loved those Deathbird Stories.

His legacy will surely continue:
Вѣчьнаꙗ памѧть
Αἰωνία ἡ μνήμη

Memory Eternal

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Lambuzhao » 03 Jul 2018 14:22

Dormouse559 wrote:
24 Jun 2018 23:16
The local public TV station
[O.o]

Good Grischt!
PBSes … they still exist????


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmQWtGn889E

321-Conact (teen-focused Science & Health Program)

Doe-eyed hostess Trini invites 'us' upstairs with her within the first 10 minutes of the debut episode for a 'surprise', and then they show us the nuts 'n' bolts of how a recording session worked (for their earworm theme) :
- Fǫ̈kk yeah, PBS, I'm sold.

I recently saw Eons, on Youtube. VG+
When I heard that Sesame Street moved to HBO ( was it a 'Rape of the Sabine Women' type move? You decide),
…Baugh. [¬.¬]

I thought it was the death knell for collective home of The Electric Company, Old Yankee Woodshop, Masterpiece Theatre, Old-G DW, frigging NOVA, Jacques Pepin, The Frugal Gourmet, Julia Child, Mister Rogers, and so much more.

[<3] [<3] [<3] [<3] [<3] Triniiiiiiiiii ! [:P] [<3] [<3] [<3] [<3] [<3]

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Lambuzhao
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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Lambuzhao » 03 Jul 2018 14:36

… Mark Russell, Mystery (OMG!) , Life on Earth (In excelsis Attenborough!), This Old House (w/ Bawb & Nawn), Siskel & Ebert, 4th of July & Other Natural Disasters, RIch Little's Peter & The Wolf w/ the Boston Pops, BTW, John Frigging WIlliams & the Boston Frigging Pops, SCTV, Bob Ross with his Happy Cool Frosty Pines.…

PBS: I could go on and on and on.…

Come to think of it, I don't think I could mention ½ the number of programs from any other of the networks I grew up watching.

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by alynnidalar » 03 Jul 2018 15:55

Frislander wrote:
03 Jul 2018 11:55
I sometimes feel like I've been deprived a bit by not having ever met any Native Americans, but then if I were to I would have to have grown up in the US, and I'm glad I haven't had to suffer that.
Uh, we don't keep Native Americans locked up in cupboards. If you have such a burning desire to meet someone who's Native American, you can just... come and meet one. (or meet one in Canada, if you'd rather avoid the US entirely) It'd be pretty weird to do that, but then, it's also pretty weird to say you feel deprived because you haven't happened to have met someone from one of a large number of ethnic and cultural backgrounds.

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by shimobaatar » 03 Jul 2018 16:17

alynnidalar wrote:
03 Jul 2018 15:55
Frislander wrote:
03 Jul 2018 11:55
I sometimes feel like I've been deprived a bit by not having ever met any Native Americans, but then if I were to I would have to have grown up in the US, and I'm glad I haven't had to suffer that.
Uh, we don't keep Native Americans locked up in cupboards. If you have such a burning desire to meet someone who's Native American, you can just... come and meet one. (or meet one in Canada, if you'd rather avoid the US entirely) It'd be pretty weird to do that, but then, it's also pretty weird to say you feel deprived because you haven't happened to have met someone from one of a large number of ethnic and cultural backgrounds.
[+1]

Native Americans aren't these mystical, elusive creatures who can't leave North America. Meeting a Native American wouldn't be all that different from meeting anyone else from a different cultural background, unless you'd treat it more like an opportunity to conduct research on a stranger than to make a new acquaintance. Native Americans are people living in the same modern world as everyone else, though, and they don't exist to create opportunities for us to enrich ourselves. If you really want to meet any Native American, though, I'm sure there are some living in the UK. You don't have to have had the misfortune of being born one of us long-suffering Americans to come across one.
Last edited by shimobaatar on 04 Jul 2018 03:50, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by eldin raigmore » 03 Jul 2018 18:12

You can meet Native Americans on their home lands in South America , Central America, and most West Atlantic islands. And Mexico spans the boundary between North and Central America.
Or meet some American servicemen (male or female) near a base on almost any continent. Native Americans have not stayed out of the US military! If you’re any good at chatting with strangers you might meet one that way.
Or if you know any expatriates from any country in the Western Hemisphere, talk to them. They may know who among their number qualify as First Peoples, or indigenes, or autochthones.

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by qwed117 » 04 Jul 2018 06:05

shimobaatar wrote:
03 Jul 2018 16:17
alynnidalar wrote:
03 Jul 2018 15:55
Frislander wrote:
03 Jul 2018 11:55
I sometimes feel like I've been deprived a bit by not having ever met any Native Americans, but then if I were to I would have to have grown up in the US, and I'm glad I haven't had to suffer that.
Uh, we don't keep Native Americans locked up in cupboards. If you have such a burning desire to meet someone who's Native American, you can just... come and meet one. (or meet one in Canada, if you'd rather avoid the US entirely) It'd be pretty weird to do that, but then, it's also pretty weird to say you feel deprived because you haven't happened to have met someone from one of a large number of ethnic and cultural backgrounds.
[+1]

Native Americans aren't these mystical, elusive creatures who can't leave North America. Meeting a Native American wouldn't be all that different from meeting anyone else from a different cultural background, unless you'd treat it more like an opportunity to conduct research on a stranger than to make a new acquaintance. Native Americans are people living in the same modern world as everyone else, though, and they don't exist to create opportunities for us to enrich ourselves. If you really want to meet any Native American, though, I'm sure there are some living in the UK. You don't have to have had the misfortune of being born one of us long-suffering Americans to come across one.
[+1] [+1] [+1] [+1] [+1]
I had a friend who's Native American (not quite sure which tribe, I think Cherokee, but I've honestly forgotten). I'm no more knowledgeable about Native Americans from him. It's more about meeting the person than meeting the ethnicity. That's probably a decent modus operandi, y'know caring about a person over their ethnicity.
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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Frislander » 04 Jul 2018 18:21

I guess. I suppose it's partly that I've just had a very white British upbringing (like almost entirely mono-ethnic, heck I didn't eve know any Jewish people before I went to university), and I think that's probably why I seem to still have this weird view of ethnicity, caus pretty much everyone who isn't white British is still "other" to me, and thus subconsciously I'm still like this even if on the outside I try and project the impression that I'm not like this at all, and I've no idea how to rectify this. (the autism probably doesn't help either).

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by sangi39 » 04 Jul 2018 20:45

I'm from roughly the same part of the country as Frislander (IIRC, we were about 20 miles from each other before he started his university course), and, yeah, around here it's pretty much white, and middle/old-aged white English. At least as of the 2011 census, 98% of people living in our District, with a population of around 90,000, are white, 54% are above the age of 45, 83% identify as Christian (with 10% stating they have no religion, with other religious affiliations making up less than 1% each), and international migration to the area has averaged around 80 people each year for the last two decades.

Politically, the district predominantly votes for Conservative Party members, with the Richmond (Yorks) constituency electing a Conservative MP in every general election since 1929, who have consistently gained not just a plurality of votes but a majority of votes in every election other than in 1997 and in the 1989 by-election, in which William Hague defeated a Social Democrat candidate by just 5% of the vote, holding the seat until 2015, the year he became the Lord Hague of Richmond, with Rishi Sunak taking his place after the general election.

On the note of Rishi Sunak, though, as far as I know, is Hindu, his family originally come from India, and so does his wife, who's the daughter of a billionaire.

I can understand the "culture shock" aspect of moving away, and had the same thing when I moved to Sheffield, which even at 81% white British is much more diverse than where I'm from. Me and my then-wife took my brother down to High Wycombe once for an anniversary celebration, and his reaction was honestly hilarious. People here can have a fairly... I don't know... "isolated" view regarding ethnicity, since we're only really exposed to it through the media and the odd exception here and there, so I guess to a point we find it harder to "get" topics of ethnic diversity since we just don't really experience it. Obviously not everyone up here is like a massive racist or anything, but referring to a Chinese takeaway restaurant as a "chinky" isn't exactly uncommon either, even amongst younger people.
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But it never gets any more true,
So close your eyes once more and once more believe
That they all still believe in you.
Just one time.

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Frislander » 04 Jul 2018 21:33

sangi39 wrote:
04 Jul 2018 20:45
I'm from roughly the same part of the country as Frislander (IIRC, we were about 20 miles from each other before he started his university course)
Well considering I'm back home for the Long Vacation I probably still am at this point in time, and 20 miles sounds about right (though we've never had enough reason to head west from where we are to give me a proper sense of how far away Richmond is, but we're definitely in the same constituency).
and, yeah, around here it's pretty much white, and middle/old-aged white English. At least as of the 2011 census, 98% of people living in our District, with a population of around 90,000, are white, 54% are above the age of 45, 83% identify as Christian (with 10% stating they have no religion, with other religious affiliations making up less than 1% each), and international migration to the area has averaged around 80 people each year for the last two decades.
And similarly in Cumbria where I lived in the earlier part of my childhood, and also County Durham where my dad's family is from. Pretty much the only thing round here that people are likely to experience in their daily lives regarding ethnicity is Traveller communities, and even then they don't look much different at all from the immediate surrounding population.
Politically, the district predominantly votes for Conservative Party members, with the Richmond (Yorks) constituency electing a Conservative MP in every general election since 1929, who have consistently gained not just a plurality of votes but a majority of votes in every election other than in 1997 and in the 1989 by-election, in which William Hague defeated a Social Democrat candidate by just 5% of the vote, holding the seat until 2015, the year he became the Lord Hague of Richmond, with Rishi Sunak taking his place after the general election.
On the note of Rishi Sunak, though, as far as I know, is Hindu, his family originally come from India, and so does his wife, who's the daughter of a billionaire.
But that only further cements his "alienness" to me; to me he just screams the kind of Tory who follows the party line and they just parachuted in when William Hague left because they know we're in the safest seat for them in the country.
I can understand the "culture shock" aspect of moving away, and had the same thing when I moved to Sheffield, which even at 81% white British is much more diverse than where I'm from. Me and my then-wife took my brother down to High Wycombe once for an anniversary celebration, and his reaction was honestly hilarious. People here can have a fairly... I don't know... "isolated" view regarding ethnicity, since we're only really exposed to it through the media and the odd exception here and there, so I guess to a point we find it harder to "get" topics of ethnic diversity since we just don't really experience it. Obviously not everyone up here is like a massive racist or anything, but referring to a Chinese takeaway restaurant as a "chinky" isn't exactly uncommon either, even amongst younger people.
I definitely wouldn't use that word, but then we practically never had takeaways growing up, or at least I never had them with people other than my immediate family who don't use it either. But yeah even Cambridge was a bit of a shock for me, and there I had loads of students from London complaining about how it was "very white".

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Reyzadren » 04 Jul 2018 22:57

Frislander wrote:
04 Jul 2018 18:21
I guess. I suppose it's partly that I've just had a very white British upbringing (like almost entirely mono-ethnic, heck I didn't eve know any Jewish people before I went to university), and I think that's probably why I seem to still have this weird view of ethnicity, caus pretty much everyone who isn't white British is still "other" to me, and thus subconsciously I'm still like this even if on the outside I try and project the impression that I'm not like this at all, and I've no idea how to rectify this. (the autism probably doesn't help either).
I didn't know any Jew until I went to university too, but I don't think that's of any importance to me and I don't care much about it because I basically fit in to pretty much any group anyway.

Once, I was classified as "Other" for a racial profile (by someone else), I felt like I achieved race uplift/ascension lol
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