Introduction to Sikwenchu

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Imralu
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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by Imralu » 25 Dec 2018 19:11

SiKwenchu sounds like it could be a Bantu language.
Glossing Abbreviations: COMP = comparative, C = complementiser, ACS / ICS = accessible / inaccessible, GDV = gerundive, SPEC / NSPC = specific / non-specific, AG = agent, E = entity (person, animal, thing)
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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by elemtilas » 25 Dec 2018 19:13

shukudai wrote:
25 Dec 2018 18:08
I only post the trademark mark symbol as the company, Sikwenchu™ Press, has the registered trademark for Sikwenchu™. The trademark applies to the publishing company which is the publishing arm of the language. There is no trademark on the language itself. The language is simply a registered work with the Copyright office as is typical for book publications.
I'm not a lawyer or anything, but I'd be willing to bet that while you might be able to write "TM" in connexion with your company's name, that doesn't apply to your invented language.

Also, you are confusing trademark and copyright. They are different, and neither apply to languages.

Again, I will strongly urge you to either contact Sai directly, or the L.C.S. in general to help you understand the legal implications surrounding invented languages.
Last edited by elemtilas on 25 Dec 2018 20:09, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by Frislander » 25 Dec 2018 20:06

shukudai wrote:
25 Dec 2018 03:33
Plus I hope to solve a much more important problem - the issue of first generation immigrants who raise children in their new country and whose children, only learning English, are unable to speak with their own relatives who got left behind in their native country. Generations pass and these individuals are never able to communicate with their own grandparents, cousins, aunts an uncles, simple because it's too difficult or expensive for each party to learn English as a second language.
Oh wow, this is a new one. Imho this is a terrible use of an auxlang - why should everyone in this scenario have to learn a language when the immigrants can simply learn their heritage language? Especially considering that, if they wish to be able to continue communicating with their family in their country of origin, they also probably wish to retain cultural links with said family, and the native language is the most significant part of any culture in that respect.

Say I was a 2nd generation Greek immigrant to the UK (I'm not, but go with it). I don't speak Greek natively, since my parents failed to pass it onto me due to everyone else around me speaking English. However I'm also very proud to be Greek, love Greek culture, and have fond memories of holidays with my extended family in Greece even if I couldn't speak with them directly. Am I gonna ask my Greek extended family to learn Esperanto with me so we can have conversations? No, that would be a stupid idea, I'd be far better off learning Greek, because it actually connects me to the culture of the speakers, i.e. my family. An auxlang won't cut it.

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by lsd » 25 Dec 2018 21:50

elemtilas wrote:
25 Dec 2018 17:01
Just a note on the legal aspect of your would be auxlang:

I think you might want to get in contact with Sai. He is probably the single most knowledgeable person in the entire universe when it comes to all the legal aspects of language invention.

It's cute (for about one second) that you write a "TM" every time you write your auxlang's name, and it's also great you own a publishing company, but the reality is your language is not copyrightable, the name of your language is not trademarkable, and all of it is likely not patentable.

The Language Creation Society have actually done quite a bit of legal work, with actual lawyers, along these lines. They actually know what they're talking about.
In other hand, LCS is the first platform for conlangers of fortune, making conlang for money in copyrighted productions...
While, conlang is not enough valuable, too long to produce, to small market of learners...
The money making is not on language, a free impossible to use thing, but a trap for nerds to buy licensed products...
In that market, copyright on language is killing the Goose That Laid the Golden Eggs...
Conlangers in these conditions are totally screwed...
For myself, whatever the law for making money thinks, I think a work as difficult as conlanging, with no legal protection, is something totally nuts, something rotten in the state of Denmark...
That can't stop us to visit, for free, those undiscover'd countries from whose no traveller returns...
Last edited by lsd on 25 Dec 2018 23:15, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by lsd » 25 Dec 2018 22:03

shukudai wrote:
25 Dec 2018 17:57
I hoping that the appeal to non-native speakers is simply that the language can be learned quickly. Imagine if someone from China, Japan, Vietnam, India, etc., all just studied for two months and could then have practical conversations with each other after only two month. Though that's not a cultural attraction, that's the type of appeal that I hope generate. Commercially, the objective is that if enough people realize that they can start communicating so quickly and easily that it then might go viral with all the individuals who struggled for years to learn English and were never successful with it.
that is a wish, but without the Dollars,as English has, to promote...
And about my second point...
lsd wrote:
25 Dec 2018 15:17
how do you intend to prevent its propagation (which is strange goal for an auxlang project) and its anarchic mutations...

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by shukudai » 25 Dec 2018 22:41

Salmoneus wrote:
25 Dec 2018 19:08
shukudai wrote:
25 Dec 2018 18:08
The language is simply a registered work with the Copyright office as is typical for book publications.
No, it isn't. Languages probably aren't copyrightable. What is copyright is the specific text of your book.

And above you talked about having a registered trademark, yet used the 'TM' symbol. 'TM' is for unregistered trademarks, and claiming to have registered a trademark when you haven't is in many contexts illegal, so again, I'd be careful.
Okay, thanks much. I see I got that wrong; it's a unregistered trademark. I'm just trying do what I read on the internet which is to make sure that you file a copyright for your work and to trademark your name, nothing more. I'm pretty sure that you're supposed to use your copyright and trademark symbols when referencing one's work.

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by shukudai » 25 Dec 2018 22:45

Imralu wrote:
25 Dec 2018 19:11
SiKwenchu sounds like it could be a Bantu language.
I don't really know; I'll have to research that. When I first found this forum, reading through the posts, I had, and still have, great difficulty in understanding a lot of the terminology used here. It's way over my head. I'll be posting more lessons soon.

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by shukudai » 25 Dec 2018 22:49

elemtilas wrote:
25 Dec 2018 19:13
shukudai wrote:
25 Dec 2018 18:08
I only post the trademark mark symbol as the company, Sikwenchu™ Press, has the registered trademark for Sikwenchu™. The trademark applies to the publishing company which is the publishing arm of the language. There is no trademark on the language itself. The language is simply a registered work with the Copyright office as is typical for book publications.
I'm not a lawyer or anything, but I'd be willing to bet that while you might be able to write "TM" in connexion with your company's name, that doesn't apply to your invented language.

Also, you are confusing trademark and copyright. They are different, and neither apply to languages.

Again, I will strongly urge you to either contact Sai directly, or the L.C.S. in general to help you understand the legal implications surrounding invented languages.
Okay, thanks again. I will explore it further.

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by shukudai » 25 Dec 2018 23:03

Frislander wrote:
25 Dec 2018 20:06
shukudai wrote:
25 Dec 2018 03:33
Plus I hope to solve a much more important problem - the issue of first generation immigrants who raise children in their new country and whose children, only learning English, are unable to speak with their own relatives who got left behind in their native country. Generations pass and these individuals are never able to communicate with their own grandparents, cousins, aunts an uncles, simple because it's too difficult or expensive for each party to learn English as a second language.
Oh wow, this is a new one. Imho this is a terrible use of an auxlang - why should everyone in this scenario have to learn a language when the immigrants can simply learn their heritage language? Especially considering that, if they wish to be able to continue communicating with their family in their country of origin, they also probably wish to retain cultural links with said family, and the native language is the most significant part of any culture in that respect.

Say I was a 2nd generation Greek immigrant to the UK (I'm not, but go with it). I don't speak Greek natively, since my parents failed to pass it onto me due to everyone else around me speaking English. However I'm also very proud to be Greek, love Greek culture, and have fond memories of holidays with my extended family in Greece even if I couldn't speak with them directly. Am I gonna ask my Greek extended family to learn Esperanto with me so we can have conversations? No, that would be a stupid idea, I'd be far better off learning Greek, because it actually connects me to the culture of the speakers, i.e. my family. An auxlang won't cut it.
Maybe it shouldn't be considered an auxlang. I never even heard of an auxlang until I saw it used yesterday on this board. Maybe it should be a humanitarian lang, as I'm trying to connect as many people together as possible, through speech.

I understand your point about wanting to maintain cultural links which I find very important. But please separate that idea from the actual process of learning a language. I've met dozens of individuals from over the year who never visited, let alone spoke, with their distant relatives from their original native country, and for one simple reason - it was too difficult for each party to learn the other language! That was the barrier - too difficult to learn!

So no big deal that you don't agree with my approach, but I believe you will find (I hope), that in time, I will quickly and easily teach many individuals how to be able to communicate with each other through my language, simply because it's ultra-easy to learn. It's not that it's better; it's simply that it's very efficient and super-easy to learn.

In fact, for any one who is a linguist, who I find to be quite intelligent people, I can have them speaking my language in short order. My claim to get one to begin speaking Sikwenchu™ in only 4 to 7 weeks is based on only studying 15 minutes per day. The entire Essential grammar book can be read in less than 4 hours the first time through, 3 hours the 2nd time through and just over 2 hours the third time through. Basically less than 10 hours of study required from the intellectual community to conquer the essential grammar. Try doing that in any other language! Time will prove me right or wrong.

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by dansoo » 25 Dec 2018 23:30

You keep insisting that your language is very simple and super quick to learn, but you still haven't said what makes it so easy.
There are plenty other languages with regular grammar and allegedly simple vocabulary out there, how is your language simpler than them?

Several other posters have also brought up an issue that I would be very interested in seeing you address. Suppose your language is very simple indeed, and via some marketing miracle it becomes widely spread. Do you think the intended purpose of this language would hold up if people, whose native languages are very different, start making small unconscious changes to your language, based on the rules of their first language, and then engrain this changes in the community by teaching the language to their friends and families? What will you do, if certain irregularities appeared in the language as it is used by the speaking community, or if it broke into several slightly different dialects?

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by Reyzadren » 25 Dec 2018 23:33

Did you go to Japan? - Na di chu Nihon?
Have you gone to Japan? - Na vi chu Nihon?
There is no difference in the sentence above, according to many non-native English speakers that I encounter. Just like almost all other auxlangs, its assumed "easy grammar" isn't really geared towards them.

And this is just one facet that I disagree with, amongst most of the few things that are shown (for example, this pronunciation system isn't as easy or logical as you think it is). Also, despite all the marketing, there is still no linguistic typology as a short concise summary from you here.

I like easy and efficient conlangs (like my own), but yours and most auxlangs aren't. Perhaps your language would appeal to English speakers, but it would not be as easy as you think it would be to non-native English speakers.
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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by shukudai » 25 Dec 2018 23:55

Reyzadren wrote:
25 Dec 2018 23:33
Did you go to Japan? - Na di chu Nihon?
Have you gone to Japan? - Na vi chu Nihon?
There is no difference in the sentence above, according to many non-native English speakers that I encounter. Just like almost all other auxlangs, its assumed "easy grammar" isn't really geared towards them.

And this is just one facet that I disagree with, amongst most of the few things that are shown (for example, this pronunciation system isn't as easy or logical as you think it is). Also, despite all the marketing, there is still no linguistic typology as a short concise summary from you here.

I like easy and efficient conlangs (like my own), but yours and most auxlangs aren't. Perhaps your language would appeal to English speakers, but it would not be as easy as you think it would be to non-native English speakers.
I could have made the language simpler but since English has such a huge following, many people are accustomed to speaking with all kinds of strange grammatical forms, which I find unnecessary. I prefer the simplicity of Chinese. But let's say an English speaking romance writer wants to convert their work to a new language. Suddenly there are grammatical forms that they'll need (saying things like "she has", "she had", "she would have had", "she would have been able to go", "she would not have had to go if he wasn't able to go".) I find all those expressions to be overkill but I use all of those structures as well so they can use them if necessary.

My language closely blends English and Chinese, with Chinese having the edge, grammar and vocabulary wise. I find their language to be exceptionally clever and efficient, at least the spoken part. Many non-categorized verbs are directly from Chinese with slight spelling or pronunciation changes.

Best of luck with your language.

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by shukudai » 26 Dec 2018 00:00

dansoo wrote:
25 Dec 2018 23:30
You keep insisting that your language is very simple and super quick to learn, but you still haven't said what makes it so easy.
There are plenty other languages with regular grammar and allegedly simple vocabulary out there, how is your language simpler than them?

Several other posters have also brought up an issue that I would be very interested in seeing you address. Suppose your language is very simple indeed, and via some marketing miracle it becomes widely spread. Do you think the intended purpose of this language would hold up if people, whose native languages are very different, start making small unconscious changes to your language, based on the rules of their first language, and then engrain this changes in the community by teaching the language to their friends and families? What will you do, if certain irregularities appeared in the language as it is used by the speaking community, or if it broke into several slightly different dialects?
I fully expect it will change. That's just the way languages work. I already have some slang versions from my first volume. All I can really do is to maintain a pure version as best as I can by publishing a large quantity of work, which I will do in 2019.

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by Frislander » 26 Dec 2018 01:25

shukudai wrote:
25 Dec 2018 22:45
Imralu wrote:
25 Dec 2018 19:11
SiKwenchu sounds like it could be a Bantu language.
I don't really know; I'll have to research that. When I first found this forum, reading through the posts, I had, and still have, great difficulty in understanding a lot of the terminology used here. It's way over my head. I'll be posting more lessons soon.
Well if you can't understand the terminology of language, maybe you're not qualified to talk about language or pass judgement on how "easy" and "natural" you think your language is, or any other for that matter...
shukudai wrote:
25 Dec 2018 23:03
Maybe it shouldn't be considered an auxlang. I never even heard of an auxlang until I saw it used yesterday on this board. Maybe it should be a humanitarian lang, as I'm trying to connect as many people together as possible, through speech.
You've intended this language as a means to facilitate communication between different cultures and linguistic backgrounds, that makes it a auxilliary language (auxlang), no need for a new term here at all.
I understand your point about wanting to maintain cultural links which I find very important. But please separate that idea from the actual process of learning a language. I've met dozens of individuals from over the year who never visited, let alone spoke, with their distant relatives from their original native country, and for one simple reason - it was too difficult for each party to learn the other language! That was the barrier - too difficult to learn!
Again, only the people/person at one end needs to learn the language in my scenario, your auxlang requires both parties to learn.

Also I'm pretty certain you're western, seeing as your given address is in Lyons, so I will point out that probably a major factor in the difficulty your (I doubt terribly representative) sample will have in learning their heritage language is that it's hard to learn a language, particularly one that isn't a widely-spoken West Indo-European language, because both of the difficulty in getting proper instruction, as well as social pressure which majorly reduces the amount of time people are able to spend learning, and outside of ethnic enclaves and/or moving to the country in question there is little of the immersion which best facilitates learning.
So no big deal that you don't agree with my approach, but I believe you will find (I hope), that in time, I will quickly and easily teach many individuals how to be able to communicate with each other through my language, simply because it's ultra-easy to learn. It's not that it's better; it's simply that it's very efficient and super-easy to learn.
[CITATION NEEDED]
In fact, for any one who is a linguist, who I find to be quite intelligent people, I can have them speaking my language in short order. My claim to get one to begin speaking Sikwenchu™ in only 4 to 7 weeks is based on only studying 15 minutes per day. The entire Essential grammar book can be read in less than 4 hours the first time through, 3 hours the 2nd time through and just over 2 hours the third time through. Basically less than 10 hours of study required from the intellectual community to conquer the essential grammar. Try doing that in any other language! Time will prove me right or wrong.
Oh come on, speaking as a linguist, reading a grammar book over and over is nothing like learning a language, and frankly it is unnecessary for actually learning - even I, someone who loves digging into a good grammar book, would still rather reach for a good Teach Yourself guide if I actually wanted to learn to speak the thing. And when you say "speaking Sikwenchu", what level are we talking here? 4 to 7 weeks on 15 minutes per day is ludicrously short for fluency.

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by shukudai » 26 Dec 2018 01:39

Let's continue on with the First Categorization Method in Sikwenchu, as shown in the Essential Grammar volume. There are many different forms of categorization to help differentiate between different types of words. Currently, I categorize and encode words in groups of 5, 6 or 9, depending upon the category. All categories have a keyword of some type, so that on average you only have to memorize one-seventh to one-eighth of the total number of words. And since the keyword has a relevant name, it makes it easier to remember the words in the group.

The first set of words is based upon "Frequency of Occurrence". It's a grouping of 5 words. Very typically, this group has a neutral word in the middle, extreme opposites on each each and intermediate words in between. You will naturally remember one word in group more easily than the others and just by knowing that word, you can logically work through to the others. The words in this "(Fr_q)uency of Occurence" group are:

Always
Usually
Sometimes
Rarely
Never

In this first method of categorization, I use a vowel set; in particular, the primary vowel set of the language: "a, e, i, o, u" (ah, eh, ee, o, u), as in the sounds you hear in "top, bet, keep, so, and true", respectively.

Always - Fraq
Usually - Freq
Sometimes - Friq
Rarely - Froq
Never - Fruq

The "q" has a hard "k" sound.

If you're following along from the earlier lessons....

She always went to China. - Sa fraq di chu Zhong Guo.
I never went to Japan. - Ya fruq di chu Nihon.
Why did she never go to Japan? - Kwai sa fruq bu di chu Nihon?
He goes to China sometimes. - Ta friq chu Zhong Guo. (He sometimes goes to China.)

Because we didn't want to go to China, we went to Spain. (Spain is Espanya)
Bik yan bu di tai chu Zhong Guo, yan di chu Espanya.

Bik sa fruq di tai chu Espanya, sa di chu Nihon.
Because she never wanted to go to Spain, she went to Japan.

Why didn't she want to go to Spain.
Kwai sa bu di tai chu Espanya?

She rarely wants to go to Japan.
Sa froq tai chu Nihon.

She rarely wanted to go to Japan.
Sa froq di tai chu Nihon.

She never wants to study.
Sa fruq tai shwe.

She always wanted to see him.
Sa fraq di tai vwa ta.


By just remembering one word in the group, or the keyword, when you become comfortable with the vowel set, the other words naturally fall into place. Just give it a couple of days and see if you don't remember these new words.

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by elemtilas » 26 Dec 2018 03:35

shukudai wrote:
26 Dec 2018 01:39
Always - Fraq
Usually - Freq
Sometimes - Friq
Rarely - Froq
Never - Fruq

By just remembering one word in the group, or the keyword, when you become comfortable with the vowel set, the other words naturally fall into place. Just give it a couple of days and see if you don't remember these new words.
Well, the problem isn't so much remembering words. It's sorting out which of the five (near) homonyms mean what.

Who fruk frak what now? Frek, I lost my place!

Kudos for arranging this along a spectrum, but when every word on the spectrum looks and sound nearly identical, this is not a help for the learner.

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by shukudai » 26 Dec 2018 03:40

elemtilas wrote:
26 Dec 2018 03:35
shukudai wrote:
26 Dec 2018 01:39
Always - Fraq
Usually - Freq
Sometimes - Friq
Rarely - Froq
Never - Fruq

By just remembering one word in the group, or the keyword, when you become comfortable with the vowel set, the other words naturally fall into place. Just give it a couple of days and see if you don't remember these new words.
Well, the problem isn't so much remembering words. It's sorting out which of the five (near) homonyms mean what.

Who fruk frak what now? Frek, I lost my place!

Kudos for arranging this along a spectrum, but when every word on the spectrum looks and sound nearly identical, this is not a help for the learner.
That's why it's important to remember the standard vowel set - "a, e, i, o, u". It's in that order. Fraq, freq, friq, froq, fruq. (from Always to Never)

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by elemtilas » 26 Dec 2018 03:57

shukudai wrote:
26 Dec 2018 03:40
elemtilas wrote:
26 Dec 2018 03:35
shukudai wrote:
26 Dec 2018 01:39
Always - Fraq
Usually - Freq
Sometimes - Friq
Rarely - Froq
Never - Fruq

By just remembering one word in the group, or the keyword, when you become comfortable with the vowel set, the other words naturally fall into place. Just give it a couple of days and see if you don't remember these new words.
Well, the problem isn't so much remembering words. It's sorting out which of the five (near) homonyms mean what.

Who fruk frak what now? Frek, I lost my place!

Kudos for arranging this along a spectrum, but when every word on the spectrum looks and sound nearly identical, this is not a help for the learner.
That's why it's important to remember the standard vowel set - "a, e, i, o, u". It's in that order. Fraq, freq, friq, froq, fruq. (from Always to Never)
Standard for who? In my standard vowel set, there's more like 12.

Auxlanging 101: you need to be crystal clear.

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by shukudai » 26 Dec 2018 04:03

elemtilas wrote:
26 Dec 2018 03:57
shukudai wrote:
26 Dec 2018 03:40
elemtilas wrote:
26 Dec 2018 03:35
shukudai wrote:
26 Dec 2018 01:39
Always - Fraq
Usually - Freq
Sometimes - Friq
Rarely - Froq
Never - Fruq

By just remembering one word in the group, or the keyword, when you become comfortable with the vowel set, the other words naturally fall into place. Just give it a couple of days and see if you don't remember these new words.
Well, the problem isn't so much remembering words. It's sorting out which of the five (near) homonyms mean what.

Who fruk frak what now? Frek, I lost my place!

Kudos for arranging this along a spectrum, but when every word on the spectrum looks and sound nearly identical, this is not a help for the learner.
That's why it's important to remember the standard vowel set - "a, e, i, o, u". It's in that order. Fraq, freq, friq, froq, fruq. (from Always to Never)
Standard for who? In my standard vowel set, there's more like 12.

Auxlanging 101: you need to be crystal clear.
In my book I make it clear that this is the initial standard vowel set in my language. Reading the book is how to really learn the language; that's why I wrote it. That's what I do when I want to learn a language - I buy copies of someone's book to learn. There are many vowels and vowel sets in Sikwenchu™.

https://www.amazon.com/Sikwenchu-Univer ... =sikwenchu

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Re: Introduction to Sikwenchu

Post by sangi39 » 26 Dec 2018 04:06

One thing I should probably note, if it hadn't been clear at this point, is that we tend to be somewhat more "critical" of auxlangs in general than with other sorts of conlangs, most likely due to the fact they have specific aims beyond "interesting" or "based mostly on attestation".

For example, one of my conlangs, Proto-Sirdic, has morphosyntactic alignment which is depending on the perfectivity, telicity and duration of the verb, another, Proto-Skawlas, as direct-inverse marking and stress-related vowel alternations (resulting in pairs like /məˈnim/, "wing", and /ˌmemˈmim/, "wings"), while another one still, Lesi Kirra, has a total of 23 noun classes, marked by a distinct, stand alone word which can in turn be used as a sort of "generic" noun, referring back to the specific noun (for example the word for "father", /ˈtʼu.ɲu/, must always be preceded by the generic noun /ˈɲa.ʃa/, but if you wanted to refer back to the father later on, you could just use /ˈɲa.ʃa/).

Now, as far as I know, to some extent or another, those are all attested in some language or another, but the goal was never for these languages to be learned by anybody (not even myself), but instead to just, well, exist, to fill a world I'm slowly building from the ground up literally just because I want to.

The more "goals" you put in place, though, the more your language will be critiqued in response to those goals. For example, you've said you've aimed for simplicity, but then thrown in a gendered distinction in the 3rd person pronouns because you personally would get confused, while, as you rightly stated, such a distinction doesn't exist in spoken Mandarin (the written distinction is the result of European influence), nor is it a distinction made in languages like Finnish, and yet they get by perfectly fine without it. So if you aiming to remove "gender" from the language, why include it there when all it does is reflect English (which as noted only has that feature because it used to have gender classes for both nouns and pronouns, but lost them in nouns).

Similarly, your way of representing tense is notably "English", albeit represented by particles not auxiliary verbs and inflection, but some of the distinctions you're making aren't found in a number of languages, at least not in the way they're marked here. So, again, why go with what English does?

On the note of "simplicity", why have you chosen the phonemes you have (including a "hard 'k', whatever that means when you have't explained what <k> represents or what "hard" means)? And why that syllable structure? Some people's native languages don't have, for example, /f/, or a distinction between /v/ and /w/, or /r/ and /l/ (go one stem further with Cantonese, which in casual speech fully lacks a distinction between /r/, /l/, and /n/). Surely that would make it somewhat more difficult of them to learn the language since pronunciation is an immediate barrier. Once again, all seeming rather... "Englishy", which pokes its way through when you're talking about English vowels being a mess. Pronunciation-wise, English vowels aren't all that odd, it's just the way we spell them that's a pain (English might only have 5 "vowels" in writing, but the spoken language has around 25 or so vowels depending on how you count them), so "making the spelling of vowels" easier only makes sense in relation to English, but not in relation to, say, Spanish, which has a fairly straightforward link between its written and spoken vowels, which at least to me suggests that you're confusing written language with spoken language, which makes sense given your comment about gender in 3rd person pronouns in Mandarin.

Anyway, what I meant to say, if I hadn't made my point yet, is that you're probably going to get a lot of people going "why have you done this this way?" and "what do you mean by this?" on this board when it comes to auxlangs, because the results tend not to match the goals, at least as we understand them. For example, what do you mean by "simple"? Because so far it looks like you mean "no inflection", but then what about syntax? You're making the same distinctions are English does, but in a different way, so it's not "more simple".
You can tell the same lie a thousand times,
But it never gets any more true,
So close your eyes once more and once more believe
That they all still believe in you.
Just one time.

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